10-11 quiz Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 10-11 quiz Deck (21):
1

Objective journalism

media’s job is to report the facts on both sides of the partisan debate

2

Signaling

alerting public to important developments

3

agenda-setting

(focusing public’s attention on particular issues)

4

Watchdog

exposing corruption, incompetence, and hypocrisy in public officials

5

Common-carrier

serving as main conduit for political communication

6

framing

putting events in a context, emphasizing certain aspects while downplaying others

7

Partisan

acting as advocate for particular interest or viewpoint

8

Information gap

increasing amount of news sources has not led to an increasingly informed electorate
-Easier to seek out entertainment rather than news

9

Confirmation bias

people prefer evidence that reinforces existing beliefs

10

Congress:

435 members in House of Representatives

Elected for 2 year terms

100 members in Senate

Elected for 6 year terms

11

Party Caucus

closed strategy planning sessions

12

Speaker of the House

2nd most powerful person in Washington

Elected by House membership

Member of majority party

13

House majority leader

#2 position, very influential for driving legislative agenda

14

House majority whip

Corrals votes, ensures passage of legislation

15

Majority Leader

Role resembles speaker of the house

16

Standing Committees

permanent committees with responsibilities for specific areas of public policies (the committee’s jurisdiction).
Majority party typically holds majority of seats

Committee chair is always member of majority party and typically has most seniority on that committee

17

Incumbency

90% of incumbents will typically win reelection

Pork (or pork-barrel spending): appropriating federal money to a representative’s home district

Gerrymandering (process of drawing up favorable districts for one party) benefits incumbents

If no incumbent in race, is an open seat election

PAC spending strongly favors incumbents

18

How a Bill Becomes a Law

Member of house or senate proposes bill

Bill sent to committee, who may assign it to a subcommittee

Marked up in committee

If majority of committee votes in favor, bill is sent to house or senate floor

90% of bills will die in committee and never receive a floor vote

House rules committee can decide if closed rule (no amendments permitted) or open rule (amendments permitted) during floor debate

Senate – any senator can filibuster, preventing a vote on legislation – unless 2/3 of senate votes to approve a cloture motion (ending debate)

Bills with broad support in committee typically pass when voted on the floor. Bills with narrow support in committee receive more scrutiny

Amendments may be used as riders (unrelated to the actual bill), and riders are often used as a poison pill to kill a bill

Floor vote: legislation passes if majority approves

If differences between a house and senate bill, will be reconciled in a conference committee.

President may sign or veto

Presidential veto can be overridden if 2/3 of House and Senate vote to override

19

Lawmaking function

authority to make laws necessary to carry out government’s powers

20

Representation function

ensure interests of states and districts are heard

21

Oversight function

see that executive branch carries out laws faithfully