1.6 - The importance of being God-centred Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 1.6 - The importance of being God-centred Deck (27):
1

Gurmukh

Gurmukh is:
1. God-centred
2. Being focused on God and spiritual things

2

Manmukh

Manmukh is:
1. Man-centred
2. Being focused on oneself and material things

3

Haumai

Haumai is:
1. Pride, or ego
2. Relying only on oneself and not God

4

Sikhs aim to have their mind centred on what at all times?

Sikhs aim to have their mind centred on God at all times

5

Sikhs aim to have their mind centred on God at all times.
A gurmukh has turned towards who?

A gurmukh has turned towards God

6

Sikhs aim to have their mind centred on God at all times.
A gurmukh has turned towards God and is in this sense becoming a what, as God intended?

A gurmukh:
1. Has turned towards God
2. Is in this sense becoming a perfect person, as God intended

7

Sikhs aim to have their mind centred on God at all times.
A gurmukh has turned towards God and is in this sense becoming a perfect person, as God intended.
Such a person lives how and does what on the Name of God?

Such a person:
1. Lives in accordance with Sikh teaching
2. Meditates on the Name of God

8

Sikhs aim to have their mind centred on God at all times.
A gurmukh has turned towards God and is in this sense becoming a perfect person, as God intended.
Such a person lives in accordance with Sikh teaching and meditates on the Name of God.
He or she is free from what?

He or she is free from:
1. Attachment
2. Pride
3. Ego
4. The evils that can overwhelm a person

9

Sikhs aim to have their mind centred on God at all times.
A gurmukh has turned towards God and is in this sense becoming a perfect person, as God intended.
Such a person lives in accordance with Sikh teaching and meditates on the Name of God.
He or she is free from attachment, pride, ego and the evils that can overwhelm a person and instead does good because it is what, not for what?

He or she:
1. Is free from attachment, pride, ego and the evils that can overwhelm a person
2. Instead does good because it is good, not for any other motive

10

''The Gurmukh attains …
The Guru Granth Sahib 1058

''The Gurmukh attains infinite spiritual wisdom and meditation.
The Gurmukh acts in harmony with God's will,
The Gurmukh finds perfection.
The mind of the Gurmukh turns away from the world … he merges in the True Lord.
He truly practises Truth forever,
true devotion is implanted within him,''
The Guru Granth Sahib 1058

11

Manmukh describes people who are centred on themselves and their own what?

Manmukh describes people who are centred on:
1. Themselves
2. Their own desires

12

Manmukh describes people who are centred on themselves and their own desires.
They are attached to worldly wealth and things that will not last.
They are not content with life, because they always want more.
They are not aware of the needs of others and so their way of life is selfish and self-centred.
They constantly think about themselves and act in the world in a way that will satisfy their own desires.
Their words and actions and their lifestyle are controlled by the 5 evils and by the illusion that convinces them that temporary material things are permanent and important.
This prevents them from doing what?

This prevents them from:
1. Being liberated
2. Achieving mukti

13

''The foolish …
The Guru Granth Sahib 144

''The foolish self-willed manmukh does not remember the Lord,
and shall regret and repent hereafter.
Thus says Nanak: O mind, you are full pride; loaded with pride, you shall depart.
O mind, don't be so proud of yourself, as if you know it all...''
The Guru Granth Sahib 144

14

Haumai is difficult to translate exactly.
It can mean pride, or egotism or self-reliance.
For many people, self-reliance would be seen as a good thing, a virtue, and in some ways it is.
However, Guru Nanak taught that this quality often prevented individuals from doing what?

Guru Nanak taught that this quality often prevented individuals from:
1. Understanding their dependence on God
2. Wanting to seek liberation

15

Haumai is difficult to translate exactly.
It can mean pride, or egotism or self-reliance.
For many people, self-reliance would be seen as a good thing, a virtue, and in some ways it is.
However, Guru Nanak taught that this quality often prevented individuals from understanding their dependence on God and wanting to seek liberation.
He wanted people to understand that while they try on their own to affect what happens in the present, or in the future and do not listen to, or obey God, there is no chance of what?

Guru Nanak wanted people to understand that while they:
1. Try on their own to affect what happens in the present, or in the future
2. Do not listen to, or obey God
,there is no chance of release from rebirth

16

Haumai is difficult to translate exactly.
It can mean pride, or egotism or self-reliance.
For many people, self-reliance would be seen as a good thing, a virtue, and in some ways it is.
However, Guru Nanak taught that this quality often prevented individuals from understanding their dependence on God and wanting to seek liberation.
He wanted people to understand that while they try on their own to affect what happens in the present, or in the future and do not listen to, or obey God, there is no chance of release from rebirth.
Haumai is sometimes described as a spiritual disease that those who are what have?

Haumai is sometimes described as a spiritual disease that those who are manmukh have

17

Haumai is difficult to translate exactly.
It can mean pride, or egotism or self-reliance.
For many people, self-reliance would be seen as a good thing, a virtue, and in some ways it is.
However, Guru Nanak taught that this quality often prevented individuals from understanding their dependence on God and wanting to seek liberation.
He wanted people to understand that while they try on their own to affect what happens in the present, or in the future and do not listen to, or obey God, there is no chance of release from rebirth.
Haumai is sometimes described as a spiritual disease that those who are manmukh have.
It takes over a person's life and the only way to overcome it is to do what?

Haumai takes over a person's life and the only way to overcome it is to:
1. Become gurmukh
2. Remember God
3. Forget oneself

18

''Living in ego, …
The Guru Granth Sahib 466

''Living in ego, mortal beings are created.
When one understands ego, then the Lord's gate is known,''
The Guru Granth Sahib 466

19

''Egotism, haumai, is opposed to …
The Guru Granth Sahib 560

''Egotism, haumai, is opposed to the Name of the Lord,
the 2 do not dwell in the same place.
In egotism, selfless service cannot be performed and so the mind goes unfulfilled,''
The Guru Granth Sahib 560

20

In Sikhism, the word 'Guru' can refer to what?

In Sikhism, the word 'Guru' can refer to:
1. One of the 10 Gurus
2. The Guru Granth Sahib
Or,
3. Sometimes God

21

In Sikhism, the word 'Guru' can refer to one of the 10 Gurus, to the Guru Granth Sahib, or sometimes to God.
This helps to explain words like what?

This helps to explain words like:
1. Gurudwara
2. Gurmukh

22

''Suffering is …
The Guru Granth Sahib 469

''Suffering is the medicine and pleasure the disease, because where there is pleasure, there is no desire for God,''
The Guru Granth Sahib 469

23

Stories from Sikh tradition, the 2 villages:
Guru Nanak and his disciple Mardana came to a village and wanted to rest for a while.
They knocked on the door of a house and asked where the inn was.
The man shut the door in their face with the words, 'Visitors are not welcome here.'
They went to several other houses, but people were rude, unhelpful and unwelcoming.
'Go away,' they said.
'There's nowhere like that around here, we don't like visitors.'
Guru Nanak decided to do what?

Guru Nanak decided to walk on to the next village

24

Stories from Sikh tradition, the 2 villages:
Guru Nanak and his disciple Mardana came to a village and wanted to rest for a while.
They knocked on the door of a house and asked where the inn was.
The man shut the door in their face with the words, 'Visitors are not welcome here.'
They went to several other houses, but people were rude, unhelpful and unwelcoming.
'Go away,' they said.
'There's nowhere like that around here, we don't like visitors.'
Guru Nanak decided to walk on to the next village.
A man saw them coming.
He said that he could see that they were thirsty and hungry and he asked them if they would like a drink of water.
Then he asked them whether they needed a place to stay and told them that he had a friend who would give them a meal and rooms for the night.
As they talked, other people came past and were friendly.
They had a good night's sleep and went on their way.
As they walked, Guru Nanak said what?

As they walked, Guru Nanak said, ''I hope that village is:
1. Uprooted
2. Scattered.''

25

Stories from Sikh tradition, the 2 villages:
Guru Nanak and his disciple Mardana came to a village and wanted to rest for a while.
They knocked on the door of a house and asked where the inn was.
The man shut the door in their face with the words, 'Visitors are not welcome here.'
They went to several other houses, but people were rude, unhelpful and unwelcoming.
'Go away,' they said.
'There's nowhere like that around here, we don't like visitors.'
Guru Nanak decided to walk on to the next village.
A man saw them coming.
He said that he could see that they were thirsty and hungry and he asked them if they would like a drink of water.
Then he asked them whether they needed a place to stay and told them that he had a friend who would give them a meal and rooms for the night.
As they talked, other people came past and were friendly.
They had a good night's sleep and went on their way.
As they walked, Guru Nanak said, ''I hope that village is uprooted and scattered.''
Mardana was amazed and suggested that surely it would be better if that happened to the first village.
Guru Nanak said what?

Guru Nanak said, ''No, if the selfish people in the first village were scattered across the world, the whole world will become selfish. If the people in the last village were spread across the world, they would make it a better place.''

26

Sikhs believe that some people are able to live moral lives and sometimes do good things, but they do not understand that too great an attachment to worldly things does what?

Sikhs believe that some people are able to live moral lives and sometimes do good things, but they do not understand that too great an attachment to worldly things:
1. Causes suffering
2. Prevents someone from seeking God, the eternal and ultimate reality

27

Sikhs believe that some people are able to live moral lives and sometimes do good things, but they do not understand that too great an attachment to worldly things causes suffering and prevents someone from seeking God, the eternal and ultimate reality.
It may be that the 'happier' one is with life, the less likely one is to do what?

It may be that the 'happier' one is with life, the less likely one is to recognise the need for God

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