1840 Flashcards Preview

Gruber's 2300 > 1840 > Flashcards

Flashcards in 1840 Deck (46):
1

pungent

D. sharp; biting

2

punitive

\ˈpyü-nə-tiv\

D. pertaining to punishment

E. any misbehavior was immediately met with a punitive response

3

purloin

D. to steal

4

purport

\ˈpər-ˌpȯrt\

D. to claim

E. do you purport to spend the rest of your life on that couch, or do you think you might get a job someday? / he purports to be an expert in criminalistics

5

purveyor

D. one who supplies

E. a purveyor of kitchen supplies

6

purview

D. scope; range; limit

E. That question is outside my purview. / The moral dilemmas of the early settlers are beyond the purview of this book.

7

pusillanimous

\pyoo-sə-ˈla-nə-məs\

D. timid; uncourageous

E. pusillanimous politicians who vote according to whichever way the political wind is blowing

8

putative

D. commonly accepted or supposed

E. the putative reason for her dismissal was poor job performance

9

putrid

D. rotten, stinking; very unpleasant

E. the putrid smell of rotten meat / a putrid pink colour

10

quack

D. a charlatan

E. quack cancer cures

11

quaff

\ˈkwäf\

D. to drink

E. We stopped at a bar and quaffed a few beers.

12

quagmire

\ˈkwag-ˌmī(-ə)r\

D. an area of soft wet ground; a difficult or dangerous situation

E. The heavy rain soon turned the field into a quagmire. / the party was once again facing its quadrennial (4-year) quagmire: the candidate sufficiently liberal to win the nomination would be too liberal for the general election

13

quail

D. to lose courage

E. He quailed at the thought of seeing her again. / Other politicians quailed before him.

14

qualm

\ˈkwäm\

D. a sudden ill feeling

E. He accepted their offer without a qualm.

15

quandary

\ˈkwän-d(ə-)rē\

D. a state of perplexity or doubt; a delimma

E. The unexpected results of the test have created a quandary for researchers. / I'm in a quandary about whether I should try to repair my stereo or buy a new one, even though I don't have the money to do either.

16

queasy

\ˈkwē-zē\

D. feeling sick; wanting to vomit; slightly nervous or worried about something

E. Travelling by boat makes me queasy. / Now she'd arrived she felt queasy inside.

17

quell

D. to subdue; to quiet

18

querulous

D. complaining

19

query

\ˈkwir-ē\

D. a question

E. I have a query about my order.

20

quibble

\ˈkwi-bəl\

D. to argue or complain about a small matter or an unimportant detail

E. he spent the entire evening quibbling about the historical inaccuracies in the television series on World War II

21

quiescent

D. inactive

22

quietude

\ˈkwī-ə-ˌtüd\

D. quiet; rest

E. the quietude of the early morning was broken only by the occasional chirping of birds

23

quintessence

D. the most perfect example

24

quip

\ˈkwip\

D. a witty remark

E. to make a quip

25

quirk

D. an aspect of somebody's personality or behaviour that is a little strange; a strange thing that happens, especially by accident

E. Everyone has their own little quirks and mannerisms. / By a strange quirk of fate they had booked into the same hotel. / a quirky sense of humour

26

quixotic

\kwik-ˈsä-tik\

D. having or involving ideas or plans that show imagination but are usually not practical (From the character Don Quixote in the novel by Miguel de Cervantes, whose adventures are a result of him trying to achieve or obtain things that are impossible.)

E. They had quixotic dreams about the future.

27

quizzical

\ˈkwi-zi-kəl\

D. showing that you are slightly surprised or amused; comically quaint; mildly teasing or mocking

E. He gave me a quizzical look when I ordered champagne. / a quizzical old man / a quizzical remark

28

rabble

D. a large group of noisy people who are or may become violent; ordinary people or people who are considered to have a low social position

E. He was met by a rabble of noisy, angry youths. / a speech that appealed to the rabble

29

rabid

D. violent; fanatical

E. a politician with rabid supporters / Her husband is a rabid baseball fan.

30

raillery

\ˈrā-lə-rē\

D. good-natured ridicule

E. Luke had to put up with a lot of raillery from his sister the first time he asked a girl for a date.

31

raiment

\ˈrā-mənt\

D. clothing

E. the prince exchanged his silken raiment for the pauper's humble homespun

32

ramification

\ˌra-mə-fə-ˈkā-shən\

D. one of the large number of complicated and unexpected results that follow an action or a decision

E. These changes are bound to have widespread social ramifications.

33

rampant

D. existing or spreading everywhere in a way that cannot be controlled

e. Unemployment is now rampant in most of Europe.

34

rancid

D. if food containing fat is rancid, it tastes or smells unpleasant because it is no longer fresh

E. Butter soon goes/turns(= becomes)rancid in this heat.

35

rancor

D. hate, especially because you think that somebody has done something unfair to you

E. There was rancor in his voice. / She learned to accept criticism without rancor. / The talks became increasingly bitter and rancorous.

36

rankle

D. if something such as an event or a remark rankles, it makes you feel angry or upset for a long time

E. Her comments still rankled. / His decision to sell the land still rankled with her.

37

rant

D. to speak or complain about something in a loud and/or angry way; rave

E. “You can rant and rave all you want,” she said, “but it's not going to change things.”

38

rapacious

\rə-ˈpā-shəs\

D. greedy; predatory; ravenous

E. nothing livens things up like a whole team of rapacious basketball players descending upon the pizza parlor / the rapacity of landowners seeking greater profit

39

rapine

\ˈra-pīn\

D. pillage, plunder

E. It will never answer to allow our free borders to be made the scene of bloodshed and rapine .

40

rapprochement

\ˌra-ˌprōsh-ˈmäⁿ\

D. a bringing together; establishment of or state of having cordial relations

E. Officials hope that these talks will lead to a rapprochement with the rebels.

41

rarefied

D. refined; thin (to make rare)

E. the rarefied atmosphere of academic life / Climbers may experience difficulty breathing in the rarefied air at high altitudes.

42

ratiocination

\ra-dio-sin-ˈnā-shən

D. reasoning

E. as an expert in ratiocination, the detective Sherlock Holmes has few rivals

43

raucous

D. loud and rowdy

44

ravage

\ˈra-vij\

D. to ruin

E. a land ravaged by war

45

ravening

d. look greedily for prey

46

rationalize

D. to find or try to find a logical reason to explain why somebody thinks, behaves, etc. in a way that is difficult to understand; to make changes to a business, system, etc. in order to make it more efficient, especially by spending less money

E. an attempt to rationalize his violent behaviour / Twenty workers lost their jobs when the department was rationalized.