1932 Flashcards Preview

Gruber's 2300 > 1932 > Flashcards

Flashcards in 1932 Deck (46):
1

remnant

\ˈrem-nənt\

D. remainder (usually small part)

E. sailed home with just a remnant of the colony's original population aboard

2

remonstrate

\ˈre-mən-ˌstrāt\

D. to protest

E. He got angry when I politely remonstrated with him about littering.

3

remunerative

\ri-ˈmyü-nə-rə-tiv\

D. profitable

E. Our investors are seeking more remunerative opportunities.

4

render

D. to cause somebody/something to be in a particular state or condition; to give somebody something, especially in return for something or because it is expected;

E. Hundreds of people were rendered homeless by the earthquake. / They rendered assistance to the disaster victims.

5

renegade

\ˈre-nə-ˌgād\

D. a person who leaves one political, religious, etc. group to join another that has very different views

E. renegades from the Republican Party

6

renounce

D. to state publicly that you no longer have a particular belief; to state publicly that you no longer wish to have a connection with somebody/something

E. to renounce ideals/principles/beliefs, etc. / He had renounced his former associates.

7

renovate

D. to renew

E. There will be extensive renovations to the hospital.

8

reparable

D. able to be repaired

9

reparation

D. a repairing

10

repartee

\ˌre-pər-ˈtē\

D. a clever reply

E. She engaged him in witty repartee.

11

repast

D. a meal

E. She offered us a light repast before we set out on our trip.

12

repercussion

\ˌrē-pər-ˈkə-shən\

D. an (bad) effect of an event

E. your decision not to go to college will have repercussions you'll feel for years to come

13

repertoire

\ˈre-pə(r)-ˌtwär\

D. all the plays, songs, pieces of music, etc. that a performer knows and can perform; all the things that a person is able to do

E. The band's repertoire includes both classic and modern jazz. / He has a limited repertoire when it comes to cooking.

14

replenish

D. to refill

15

replete

D. to full; to stuff

16

repository

\ri-ˈpä-zə-ˌtȯr-ē\

D. a place where things are kept

E. a repository for nuclear waste / He is the repository of many secrets.

17

reprehensible

D. deserving criticism

18

reprieve

\ri-ˈprēv\

D. to officially cancel or delay a punishment; to officially cancel or delay plans to close something or end something

E. a reprieved murderer / 70 jobs have been reprieved until next April.

19

reprimand

D. a formal rebuke

20

reprisal

D. a violent or aggressive act towards somebody because of something bad that they have done towards you

E. They shot ten hostages in reprisal for the assassination of their leader.

21

reproach

D. to make sb feel ashamed

22

reprobate

\ˈre-prə-ˌbāt\

D. a person of no principle

E. reprobate behaviour

23

reprove

D. to rebuke

24

repudiate

D. to disown; to deny

E. a generation that has repudiated the values of the past

25

repugnant

\rē-'päg-ne'nt\

D. contradictory; offensive

E. technically speaking, it may not be a violation, but it is certainly repugnant to the spirit of the law

26

requiem

D. a Mass or music for the dead

27

requisite

\ˈre-kwə-zət\

D. required

E. this new CD is the requisite album of the year for classical music lovers

28

requite

\ri-ˈkwīt\

D. to give something such as love, kindness, a favour, etc. in return for what somebody has given you

E. requited love

29

resilient

\ri-ˈzil-yənt\

D. able to feel better quickly after something unpleasant such as shock, injury, etc; elastic; buoyant (capable of floating)

E. He'll get over it—young people are amazingly resilient.

30

rescind

\ri-ˈsind\

D. to repeal, to officially state that a law, contract, decision, etc. is no longer valid

E. The navy rescinded its ban on women sailors.

31

respite

\ˈres-pət\

D. a delay; a letup

E. The bad weather has continued without respite.

32

resplendent

\rēs-'plən-dənt\

D. splendid

E. The fields were resplendent with flowers. / She looked resplendent in her green evening gown.

33

restitution

\ˌres-tə-ˈtü-shən\

D. restoration: reimbursement

E. the restitution of her stolen property / He was ordered to make restitution to the victim.

34

restive

\ˈres-tiv\

D. unable to stay still, or unwilling to be controlled, especially because you feel bored or not satisfied

E. The crowd was growing increasingly restive.

35

resurgent

D. rising again

36

resuscitate

\ri-ˈsä-sə-ˌtāt\

D. to revive from apparent death or from unconsciousness

E. The patient stopped breathing but doctors were able to resuscitate him. / she hopes to resuscitate the currently defunct charity organization

37

retaliate

\ri-ˈta-lē-ˌāt\

D. to revenge

E. After the company announced plans to reduce benefits, the union threatened to retaliate by calling for a strike.

38

retentive

\ri-ˈten-tiv\

D. holding; able to store facts and remember things easily

E. soils retentive of moisture / She has an amazingly retentive memory.

39

reticent

D. speaking very little

E. He was extremely reticent about his personal life.

40

retinue

\ˈre-tə-ˌnü\

D. a group of followers or attendant

E. the king and his retinue / a pop star traveling with his retinue

41

retort

\ri-ˈtȯrt\

D. to reply quickly to a comment, in an angry, offended or humorous way

E. ‘Don't be ridiculous!’ Pat retorted angrily. / Sam retorted that it was my fault as much as his.

42

retract

\ri-ˈtrakt\

D. to take back

E. A cat can retract its claws. / Their college grants were retracted.

43

retribution

D. severe punishment for something seriously wrong that somebody has done

E. People are seeking retribution for the latest terrorist outrages.

44

retrieve

D. to recover (sth); to save

E. You can only retrieve the situation by apologizing. / Many archaeological relics were retrieved from the site. / The dog retrieved the ball from the water. / to retrieve information from the database

45

retroactive

\re-tro-ˈak-tiv\

D. applying to the past

E. They all received a retroactive pay raise. / The new tax will be retroactive to January 1.

46

retrograde

\ˈre-trə-ˌgrād\

D. going backward, making a situation worse or returning to how something was in the past

E. a retrograde policy that would leave more people poorer than they are now / The closure of the factory is a retrograde step.