3.1.5 Agonist & Antagonist substitution (Add) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 3.1.5 Agonist & Antagonist substitution (Add) Deck (27):
1

these drugs are mainly given to addicts with what type of addictions?

chemical addictions e.g. heroin, alcohol

2

why do bio-psychologists advocate the use of drug treatments?

all that is psychological including addiction is first biological
medical model - treat behaviours biologically

3

what is an agonist?

a chemical binding to a postsynaptic receptor that activates the receptor to produce a response imitating the action of another substance e.g.heroin

4

what is methaone?

painkiller and heroin substitute used in treating heroin addiction (agonist)

5

(agonist) methadone has similar effects to heroin without what?

the buzz/high

6

(agonist) methadone is an opiate, opiates are sedatives, what do they do?

depress the nervous system
slow down body functioning
reduce pain

7

(agonist) what happens to the dose of methadone the patient is given over time? and why?

reduced over time
so the patient can give up their addiction without withdrawal symptoms

8

(agonist) what are some side effects of methadone?

reduced pain (physical and psychological)
feelings of warmth
overdose - coma

9

(agonist) what does the use of methadone allow people to tackle?

their addiction and stabilise their life

10

(agonist) methadone is less severe than what?

completely removing heroin

11

(agonist) methadone is aimed at what?

preventing withdrawal symptoms from stopping heroin

12

(agonist) what does NICE recommend the initial dose of methadone to be?

10-40mg

13

(agonist) NICE say dose of methadone can be increased by 10mg per day until what?

no withdrawal signs or intoxication visible
maintenance dose of 60-120mg reached

14

(agonist) NICE - in what ways can methadone be administered?

drunk as a green liquid
if necessary available in injection and tablet form

15

(agonist) medical professionals see the methadone patient each day for how long and in what sort of setting?

3 months
out patient setting

16

(agonist) why is supervision by medical professionals required of the methadone patient?

to ensure they don't overdose and are complying with their treatment

17

(agonist) it is recommended that methadone treatment is given alongside what and why?

other psychological support e.g. counselling
may make the patient feel more supported and willing to comply with treatment and addresses the root cause of the addiction

18

what is an antagonist?

a chemical that binds to a receptor blocking the usual function of a particular substance - doesn't cause a reaction

19

what type of drug is naltrexone?

antagonist

20

(antagonist) who is naltrexone given to?

those with opiod & alcohol addictions

21

(antagonist) in the future what other addictions could naltrexone possibly treat?

gambling

22

(antagonist) it is recommended naltrexone is given along side what and why?

other psychological support e.g. counselling
may make the patient feel more supported and willing to comply with treatment and addresses the root cause of the addiction

23

(antagonist) what does the addict have to do to be administered naltrexone?

stop using opiods
demonstrate they are motivated to be drug free

24

(antagonist) how can naltrexone be administered?

implant
oral medication
depot injection (released slowly over a no. of weeks)

25

(antagonist) how long is a patient on naltrexone supervised for and why?

up to 6 months
to ensure they haven't relapsed

26

(antagonist) naltrexone blocks the pleasurable affects associated with opiods making them what?

less rewarding

27

(antagonist) naltrexone is used in which stage of recovery?

abstinence stage

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