5. Polyagglutination Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 5. Polyagglutination Deck (16):
1

What causes a repulsive electric zeta potential between cells?

Carboxyl groups of sialic acids on RBC membranes

2

Example of a panagglutin?

auto-anti-I (b/c all adult cells have I antigens)

3

What type of immunoglobulin is anti-T and type of population it's found in?

IgM
All adults

4

Peanut lectin = ?

Arachis hypohaea

5

3 types of inherited polyagglutination?

HEMPAS
Sd(a++); Cad
NOR

6

Why don't cord (newborn) plasma have anti-T?

Anti-T are developed after exposure to environmental factors

7

How to avoid hemolysis when transfusion w/ T-activated RBCs?

Use washed cellular products (remove any plasma)

8

Purpose of lectins

To check for exposure of T antigens on RBCs (lectins will react with T antigens)

9

Soya bean lectin = ?

Glycine soja

10

Most common ACQUIRED polyagglutination?

T-activation

11

T-activation is also known as the _________ phenomenon

Thomsen-Hubener-Friedenreich phenomenon

12

What is a cryptantigen

AKA T antigen

Present on surface of all RBCs but masked by sialic aci

13

T-activation of red cells is most often seen in ________ with infections

children

14

Enzyme produced by microbes that remove sialic acid from RBC membranes = exposes T antigens

Neuraminidase

15

Alternative way RBCs can become T activated?

In vitro by bacterial contamination of specimen

16

anti-T is usually not a problem b/c of these 2 reasons

- Zeta potential protects cells from exposure

- Sialic acid hides T antigens