598 Flashcards Preview

Gruber's 2300 > 598 > Flashcards

Flashcards in 598 Deck (46):
1

cumbersome

\ˈkäm-bər-səm\

D. clumsy

E. The application process is cumbersome and time-consuming.

2

cuneate

\ˈkyü-nē-ˌāt\

D. wedge-shaped

E. cuneate leaf

3

cupidity

\kyu̇-ˈpi-di-tē\

D. greed

E. reports of great treasure in the Indies inflamed the cupidity of Columbus's crew

4

curmudgeon

\kər-ˈm(ä)-jən\

D. a bad-tempered, cantankerous person

E. only a curmudgeon would object to the nursing home's holiday decorations

5

curry*

\ˈk(ə)r-ē\

D. to try to obtain favor by flattery

6

cursory

\ˈk(ə)r-sə-rē\

D. superficial

E. a cursory glance / Even the most cursory look at the organization's records shows problems.

7

curtail

D. to cut short

8

cynic

D. a person who believes all actions are n\motivated by selfishness

E. A cynic might think that the governor visited the hospital just to gain votes.

9

dais

\ˈd(ā)-əs\

D. a platform in a hall or room

E. the speaker took his place at the front of the dais

10

dally

\ˈda-lē\

D. to play or trifle; to waste time

E. accused him of dallying with a serious problem

11

dank

\ˈdaŋk\

D. damp

E. vegetables tended to go bad quickly in the dank cellar

12

dastard

\ˈd(a)s-tərd\

D. a mean coward

E. the villain of the story is a dastard indeed

13

daunt

\ˈdänt\

D. to intimidate

E. he raging inferno didn't daunt the firefighters for a moment

14

dauntless

D. bold

15

dearth

\ˈdərth\

D. scarcity

E. there was a dearth of usable firewood at the campsite

16

debacle

\dē-ˈb(ä)-kəl\

D. an overwhelming defeat or failure

E. After the debacle of his first novel, he had trouble getting a publisher for his next book.

17

debase

D. to lower in dignity, quality, or value

E. The governor debased himself by lying to the public.

18

debauch

\di-ˈb(ä)-ch\

D. to corrupt

E. the long stay on a tropical isle had debauched the ship's crew to the point where they no longer acted liked naval professionals

19

debilitate

D. to weaken

E. the virus debilitates the body's immune system.

20

debonair

\ˌde-bə-ˈn(e)r\

D. courteous; gay

E. Their history, past and recent, may be scribbled with viciousness and deprivation, but the debonair politeness, the good humor, of the Irish I met, who are still among the poorest people in the West, gave me to believe that calamity breeds mellow character.

21

decadence

D. decay

E. The book condemns the decadence of modern society.

22

decamp

D. to break camp; to run away

E. He decamped to Europe soon after news of the scandal broke.

23

deciduous

D. falling off at a certain time or yearly (as leaves from trees)

E. a deciduous forest / tree

24

decimate

\ˈd(e)-sə-ˌmāt\

D. to kill a large part of

E. Budget cuts have decimated public services in small towns. / firebombs decimated the city

25

declivity

\di-cl(ē)-vi-tē\

D. a downgrade; a slope

E. the cabin is precariously perched on a declivity of the mountain's northern face

26

decorous

\ˈd(e)-kər-əs\

D. proper

E. we were asked to be on our most decorous behavior at the formal event / the oppressively decorous standards of a royal court

27

decoy

\ˈd(ē)-ˌkȯi\

D. a lure or bait

E. we set the decoy afloat in the marsh and from the blind waited for the ducks to arrive

28

decrepit

\di-ˈkr(e)-pit\

D. weak from age

E. My decrepit car barely starts.

29

decry

D. to speak against publicly

E. In her article, she decries the pollution of the environment by manufacturers. / Violence on television is generally decried as harmful to children.

30

deduce

\di-ˈdüs\

D. to reason out logically; to conclude from known facts

E. I can deduce from the simple observation of your behavior that you're trying to hide something from me.

31

de facto

\di-ˈf(a)k-tō\

D. in fact, actuall

E. with the death of his father, he became the de facto head of the family / a de facto state of war

32

defalcate

\di-ˈf(e)l-ˌkāt\

D. to misuse money left in one's care; to embezzle

33

defamation

\ˌde-fə-ˈm(ā)-shən\

D. slander

E. accused the newspaper columnist of defamation of character

34

default

D. neglect; failure to do what is required

E. lost the game by default / The defendant has made no appearance in the case and is in default. / You can enter your own settings or use the defaults.

35

defection

\di-ˈf(e)k-shən\

D. desertion; conscious abandonment of duty (as to a person, cause, or doctrine)

E. He was overcome by a sudden defection of courage. / His defection to East Germany was regarded as treasonable.

36

deference

\ˈd(e)-fə-rəns\

D. regard for another's wishes

E. Her relatives treat one another with deference. / She returned early in deference to her parents' wishes.

37

defile

D. to make dirty or pollute; to dishonor

E. the countryside defiled by billboards / defile a sanctuary

38

definitive

\di-ˈf(i)-ni-tiv\

D. conclusive; distinguishing

E. a definitive victory / The court has issued a definitive ruling. / a definitive collection of the band's albums

39

deflect

D. to turn aside; to deviate

E. armor that can deflect bullets / They are trying to deflect attention from the troubled economy.

40

defunct

D. not functioning

41

deign

\ˈdān\

D. to condscend (reluctantly and with a strong sense of the affront to one's superiority that is involved)

E. I wouldn't deign to answer that absurd accusation.

42

delete

D. to strike out or erase

43

deleterious

\ˌde-lə-ˈt(i)r-ē-əs\

D. harmful

E. The chemical is deleterious to the environment. / In developing countries, the imposition of boundaries around national parks and protected areas has been deleterious for both people and wildlife.

44

delineate

\di-ˈl(i)-nē-ˌāt, dē-\

D. to sketch or design; to portray

E. lights delineating the narrow streets / The report clearly delineates the steps that must be taken. / The characters in the story were carefully delineated.

45

delude

\də-ˈlüd\

D. to mislead

E. we deluded ourselves into thinking that the ice cream wouldn't affect our diet

46

delusion

\də-ˈlü-zhən\

D. a false belief

E. He is living under the delusion that he is incapable of making mistakes. / As the illness progressed, his delusions took over and he had violent outbursts.