An Inspector Calls Flashcards Preview

English Literature > An Inspector Calls > Flashcards

Flashcards in An Inspector Calls Deck (50):
1

Arthur Birling is a “_____-looking, rather __________ man... fairly ____ manners but rather __________ in his speech”

Arthur Birling is a “heavy-looking, rather portentous man... fairly easy manners but rather provincial in his speech”

2

Sybil Birling is a “rather ____ woman and her husband’s ______ ________.”

Sybil Birling is a “rather cold woman and her husband’s social superior.”

3

“Sheila is a ______ girl in her early twenties, very _______ with life and rather _______.”

“Sheila is a pretty girl in her early twenties, very pleased with life and rather excited.”

4

Gerald is “rather too _____ to be a _____ but very much the easy ____-____ young ___-about-____”

Gerald is “rather too manly to be a dandy but very much the easy well-bred young man-about-town”

5

Eric is “not quite at ___, half ___, half _________”

Eric is “not quite at ease, half shy, half assertive”

6

They “are ______ with __________.”

They “are pleased with themselves.”

7

Mrs Birling: “When you’re _______ you’ll realise that men with _________ work to do sometimes have to spend nearly all their ____ and ______ on their ________. You’ll have to get ____ to that, just as I had.

Sheila: “I don’t believe I will. (Half _______, half serious, to Gerald.) So you be _______.”

Mrs Birling: “When you’re married you’ll realise that men with important work to do sometimes have to spend nearly all their time and energy on their business. You’ll have to get used to that, just as I had.

Sheila: “I don’t believe I will. (Half playful, half serious, to Gerald.) So you be careful.

8

Sheila: “You’re _______.”

Eric: “__ ___.”

Mrs Birling: “What an __________, Sheila! Really the things you _____ pick up _____ ____!”

Sheila: “You’re squiffy.”

Eric: “I’m not.”

Mrs Birling: “What an expression, Sheila! Really the things you girls pick up these days!”

9

Mr Birling to ______: “and now you’ve _______ us together, and perhaps we may look _______ to the time when ______ and ________ are no longer _________ but are working together - for _____ costs and higher ______.”

Mr Birling to Gerald: “and now you’ve brought us together, and perhaps we may look forward to the time when Crofts and Birlings are no longer competing but are working together - for lower costs and higher prices.”

10

Mr Birling: “and I _____ as a ____-______ ________ man”

Mr Birling: “and I speak as a hard-headed business man”

11

Mr Birling: “I say there isn’t a ______ of ___”

Mr Birling: “I say there isn’t a chance of war”

12

Mr Birling: “[On the _______:] __________, absolutely __________”

Mr Birling: “[On the Titanic:] unsinkable, absolutely unsinkable”

13

Mr Birling: “a ___ has to make his own ___ - has to look after _______ - and his ______ too, of course, when he has one - and so ____ as he does that he won’t come to much ____. But the way some of these ______ talk and _____ now, you’d think _________ has to look after _________ else, as if we were all _____ up together like ____ in a ____ - _________ and all that ________. But take my word for it, you __________ - and I’ve learnt in the ____ ____ school of __________ - that a ___ has to mind his own ________ and look after _______ and his own - and -

We hear the _____ ____ of a door bell. Birling stops to ______.

Mr Birling: “a man has to make his own way - has to look after himself - and his family too, of course, when he has one - and so long as he does that he won’t come to much harm. But the way some of these cranks talk and write now, you’d think everybody has to look after everybody else, as if we were all mixed up together like bees in a hive - community and all that nonsense. But take my word for it, you youngsters - and I’ve learnt in the good hard school of experience - that a man has to mind his own business and look after himself and his own - and -

We hear the sharp ring of a door bell. Birling stops to listen.

14

The _________ need not be a ___ man but he creates at once an impression of ____________, ________ and ______________. He is a man in his _______, dressed in a _____ _______ suit of the ______.

He speaks _________, _________, and has a _____________ habit of looking ____ at the person he addresses before actually ________.

The Inspector need not be a big man but he creates at once an impression of massiveness, solidity and purposefulness. He is a man in his fifties, dressed in a plain darkish suit of the period.

He speaks carefully, weightily, and has a disconcerting habit of looking hard at the person he addresses before actually speaking.

15

[On _______ of a young woman’s suicide by ________ ______:]

Eric: “(_____________) My ___!”

Mr Birling: “(rather ___________) Yes, yes. _____ ________. But I don’t understand why you should come here, Inspector-“

______: “Oh - how ________! Was it an ________?”

[On hearing of a young woman’s suicide by drinking bleach:]

Eric: “(involuntarily) My God!”

Mr Birling: “rather impatiently) Yes, yes. Horrid business. But I don’t understand why you should come here, Inspector-“

Sheila: “Oh - how horrible! Was it an accident?”

16

Mr Birling: “Still, I can’t accept any ______________. If we were all ___________ for __________ that happened to _________ we’d had ________ to do with, it would be very _______, wouldn’t it?”

Mr Birling: “Still, I can’t accept any responsibility. If we were all responsible for everything that happened to everybody we’d had anything to do with, it would be very awkward, wouldn’t it?”

17

Mr Birling, explaining why he sacked ___ _____ for asking for more _____: “If you don’t come down _______ on some of these ______, they’d soon be asking for the _____.”

Inspector: “They might. But after all, it’s ______ to ___ for the ______ than to ____ it.”

Mr Birling, explaining why he sacked Eva Smith for asking for more money: “If you don’t come down sharply on some of these people, they’d soon be asking for the earth.”

Inspector: “They might. But after all, it’s better to ask for the earth than to take it.”

18

Sheila: “(rather __________) Sorry! It’s just that I can’t ____ thinking about this ____ - __________ herself so ________ - and I’ve been so _____ tonight. Oh I ____ you hadn’t ____ me. What was she like? Quite _____?”

Sheila: “(rather distressed) Sorry! It’s just that I can’t help thinking about this girl - destroying herself so horribly - and I’ve been so happy tonight. Oh I wish you hadn’t told me. What was she like? Quite young?”

19

Inspector: “In fact, I’ve _______ it would do us all a bit of ____ if sometimes we tried to put _________ in the place of these _____ _____ counting their _______ in their _____ little back ________.”

Inspector: “In fact, I’ve thought it would do us all a bit of good if sometimes we tried to put ourselves in the place of these young women counting their pennies in their dingy little back bedrooms.”

20

Gerald: “After all, y’know, we’re ___________ ________ and not _________.”

Inspector: “Sometimes there isn’t as much __________ as you might _____. Often, if it was ____ __ __, I wouldn’t know where to ____ the ____.”

Gerald: “After all, y’know, we’re respectable citizens and not criminals.”

Inspector: “Sometimes there isn’t as much difference as you might think. Often, if it was left to me, I wouldn’t know where to draw the line.”

21

Sheila: “How did you come to ____ this girl - ___ _____?”

Gerald: “_ _____.”

Sheila: “_____ ______ then - it’s the ____ _____.”

Gerald: “Why should I ____ _____ her?”

Sheila: “How did you come to know this girl - Eva Smith?”

Gerald: “I didn’t.”

Sheila: “Daisy Renton then - it’s the same thing.”

Gerald: “Why should I have known her?”

22

Mrs Birling: “You seem to have made a great __________ on this _____, Inspector.”

Inspector: “(______) We often do on the _____ ones. They’re more ______________.”

Mrs Birling: “You seem to have made a great impression on this child, Inspector.”

Inspector: “(coolly) We often do on the young ones. They’re more impressionable.”

23

Mrs Birling: “_____ of that _____-“

Sheila: “(urgently, cutting in) Mother, don’t - please don’t. For your ___ ____, as well as ours, you mustn’t-“

Mrs Birling: “(annoyed) Mustn’t - what? Really, Sheila!

Sheila: “(slowly, _________ now) You mustn’t try to _____ up a kind of ____ between __ and ____ ____. If you do, then ___ _________ will just _____ it ____. And it’ll be all the _____ when he does.”

Mrs Birling: “Girls of that class-“

Sheila: “(urgently, cutting in) Mother, don’t - please don’t. For your own sake, as well as ours, you mustn’t-“

Mrs Birling: “(annoyed) Mustn’t - what? Really, Sheila!

Sheila: “(slowly, carefully now) You mustn’t try to build up a kind of wall between us and that girl. If you do, then the Inspector will just break it down. And it’ll be all the worse when he does.”

24

Gerald: “(trying to _____) Well ____, Sheila?

Gerald: “I _____.”

Gerald: “___ should I have _____ her?”

Gerald: “All right, I ____ ___. Let’s _____ it at ____.”

Gerald: “(___________ her) Now listen, _______-“

He does ___ _____.

He does ___ _____ but _____ at ___.

Gerald: “-don’t say ________ to ___ _________.”

Gerald: “(trying to smile) Well what, Sheila?

Gerald: “I didn’t.”

Gerald: “Why should I have known her?”

Gerald: “All right, I knew her. Let’s leave it at that.”

Gerald: “(approaching her) Now listen, darling-“

He does not reply.

He does not reply but looks at her.

Gerald: “-don’t say anything to the Inspector.”

25

Gerald: “I didn’t _______ to stay long ____ _____. I hate those ____-____ _____-_____ women. But then I noticed a ____ who looked quite _________. She was ______ - ____ brown hair and big ____ eyes - (breaks off.) __ ___!”

_________: “What’s the matter?”

Gerald: “(__________) Sorry - I - well, I’ve suddenly _________ - taken it in ________ - that she’s ____ - “

Gerald: “I didn’t propose to stay long down there. I hate those hard-eyed dough-faced women. But then I noticed a girl who looked quite different. She was pretty - soft brown hair and big dark eyes - (breaks off.) My God!”

Inspector: “What’s the matter?”

Gerald: “(distressed) Sorry - I - well, I’ve suddenly realised - taken it in properly - that she’s dead - “

26

Gerald: “Old ___ ________, half-_____ and ______-eyed, has ______ her into a corner with that _______ fat _______ of his-“

Gerald: “Old Joe Meggarty, half-drunk and goggle-eyed, has wedged her into a corner with that obscene fat carcass of his-“

27

______ to Gerald: “You were the wonderful _____ ______. You must have ______ it, Gerald.”

Gerald: “Alright - I did ___ _ ____. Nearly ___ ___ would have done.”

Sheila: “That’s probably about the ____ thing you’ve said _______. At _____ it’s ______.”

Sheila to Gerald: “You were the wonderful fairy prince. You must have adored it, Gerald.”

Gerald: “Alright - I did for a time. Nearly any man would have done.”

Sheila: “That’s probably about the best thing you’ve said tonight. At least it’s honest.”

28

Sheila: “I don’t _______ you as I did ____ __ ____ ago. In fact, in some ___ ___, I rather _______ you more than I’ve ____ ____ before.”

Sheila: “I don’t dislike you as I did half an hour ago. In fact, in some odd way, I rather respect you more than I’ve ever done before.”

29

Inspector: “You _____ to be being __________ against her ____?”

___ _______: “Yes.”

Sheila: “Mother, she’s just died a ________ _____ - don’t ______.”

Mrs Birling: “I’m ____ _____. But I think she had ____ _______ to blame.”

Inspector: “You admit to be being prejudiced against her case?”

Mrs Birling: “Yes.”

Sheila: “Mother, she’s just died a horrible death - don’t forget.”

Mrs Birling: “I’m very sorry. But I think she had only herself to blame.”

30

Mrs Birling: “I’ll tell you what I ____ ___. Go and ____ for the ______ of the _____. It’s his ______________.”

Mrs Birling: “I’ll tell you what I told her. Go and look for the father of the child. It’s his responsibility.”

31

Inspector to ___ _______: “She was here _____, friendless, almost _________, desperate. She needed not only money but ______, sympathy, friendliness. You’ve had ________. You ____ have know what she was feeling. And you _______ ___ ____ in her face.”

Sheila: “(with _______) Mother, I think it was cruel and ____.”

Inspector to Mrs Birling: “She was here alone, friendless, almost penniless, desperate. She needed not only money but advice, sympathy, friendliness. You’ve had children. You must have know what she was feeling. And you slammed the door in her face.”

Sheila: “(with feeling) Mother, I think it was cruel and vile.”

32

Mrs Birling to ____: “But I didn’t ____ it was ___.”

Mrs Birling to Eric: “But I didn’t know it was you.”

33

Mr Birling to Eric: “You ______ ____ - why didn’t you come __ __ when you found yourself __ ____ ____?”

Eric: “Because you’re not the ____ of _______ a ____ could go to when he’s in _______ - that’s ___.”

Mr Birling to Eric: “You damned fool - why didn’t you come to me when you found yourself in this mess?”

Eric: “Because you’re not the kind of father a chap could go to when he’s in trouble - that’s why.”

34

_________: “But each of you helped to ____ ___. ________ that. Never ______ it.”

Inspector: “But each of you helped to kill her. Remember that. Never forget it.”

35

Inspector: “But just _________ this. ___ ___ Smith has gone - but there are ________ and ________ and ________ of ___ Smiths and ____ Smiths still left with __, with their lives, their _____, their fears, their _________ and chance of _________, all intertwined with our _____, and what we think and ___ and __. We don’t live _____. We are _______ of one ____. We are ___________ for each other. And I tell you that the ____ will soon ____ when, if ___ will not learn that ______, then they will be taught it in ____ and _____ and _______.”

Inspector: “But just remember this. One Eva Smith has gone - but there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths still left with us, with their lives, their hopes, their fears, their suffering and chance of happiness, all intertwined with our lives, and what we think and say and do. We don’t live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other. And I tell you that the time will soon come when, if men will not learn that lesson, then they will be taught it in fire and blood and anguish.”

36

Mr Birling: “Most of this is _____ to ____ out. There’ll be a public _______.”

Mr Birling: “Most of this is bound to come out. There’ll be a public scandal.”

37

____: “He was our ______ _________ all right.”

Eric: “He was our police inspector all right.”

38

Sheila: “All right. But it ______ make any real __________, y’know.”

___ _______: “Of course it does.”

Eric: “__, Sheila’s _____. It ______.”

Sheila: “All right. But it doesn’t make any real difference, y’know.”

Mrs Birling: “Of course it does.”

Eric: “No, Sheila’s right. It doesn’t.”

39

______: “But you’re __________ one thing I still can’t ______. Everything we said had ________ really had ________. If it didn’t ___ _________, then that’s _____ for us. But it _____ ____ done.”

Sheila: “But you’re forgetting one thing I still can’t forget. Everything we said had happened really had happened. If it didn’t end tragically, then that’s lucky for us. But it might have done.”

40

Sheila: “You began to _____ something. And now you’ve _______. You’re ready to go on in ___ ____ ___.”

Sheila: “You began to learn something. And now you’ve stopped. You’re ready to go on in the same way.”

41

Context

Priestley wrote the play in 1945. When was the play set?

1912.

42

Context

What was the capitalist system like in Britain?

Resources and factories were controlled by private owners who sought to maximise their profits by pricing their products high and by paying their workers as low as they could.

43

Context

What were Trade Unions?

Organisations formed to protect workers and campaign for better working conditions - formed in the 19th Century and gained increasing power and legal rights as the century progressed.

44

Context

Women's dissatisfaction with their second-class status had been building. What happened in the 1910s?

It erupted into violence, led by the Suffragettes, who campaigned forcefully for the right to vote.

45

Context

Why did Priestley set the play in 1912?

To expose what he regarded as the ignorance and naivete of the powerful and priviledged.

46

Methods

Lighting.

The lighting gets harder/brighter when the Inspector arrives - symbolising he brings the truth of the real world into their cosy, sheltered one.

47

Methods

Symbolic Names.

Eva Smith = Eve (first woman) Smith (very common surname).

Daisy Renton = Daisy (flower, new life) Renting (struggling to survive).

Inspector Goole = Spectre Ghoul (supernatural).

48

Methods

Eva Smith is never actually present on stage.

This makes her less of an individual and more of a universal symbol of all victims of inequality in Britain at the time. It also symbolises her limited social status and neglection.

49

Methods

Structure of one interrogation after another.

This creates suspense and also shows how one thing links to another - proving that everyone is responsible in Eva Smith's death.

50

Methods

Aristotle's Dramatic Unities.

Place (all the action must take place in one main location); Time (all the action should take place within 24 hours); Action (there should be one main story, without several subplots).

Adds a sense of realism and makes the audience believe all of the unlikely and symbolic coincidences.