Basic Group 10 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Basic Group 10 Deck (210):
1

amenity

a desirable or useful feature or facility of a building or place

2

replenish

fill (something) up again OR restore (a stock or supply) to a former level or condition (e.g. energy)

3

inexorable

impossible to stop or prevent (e.g. PC has been inexorably tangled up in wires) OR (of a person) impossible to persuade; unrelenting

4

inextricable

impossible to disentangle or separate (e.g. a successful education and a successful career is inextricable OR impossible to escape from (e.g. this is inextricable, face it.)

5

inexplicable

unable to be explained or accounted for

6

interrogate

ask questions of (someone) closely, aggressively, or formally (e.g. sorry for the interrogation)

7

debrief

question (someone, e.g. a soldier or spy) about a completed mission or undertaking CAN ALSO BE NOUN (e.g. during the debrief, two Russian spies were exposed)

8

assail

make a concerted or violent attack on OR (of an unpleasant feeling or physical sensation) come upon (someone) suddenly and strongly (e.g. she was assailed with anxiety) OR criticise strongly (e.g. the team was assailed for their performance)

9

assimilate

take in and understand fully (information or ideas) (e.g. I am trying to assimilate these new vocabularies) OR absorb and integrate (people, ideas, or culture) into a wider society or culture (e.g. pop trends are assimilated into the mainstream with alarming speed) OR (of the body or any biological system) absorb and digest (food or nutrients) OR regard as similar; liken (e.g. perceptions are assimilated to thoughts)

10

unrelenting

not yielding in strength, severity, or determination OR not giving way to kindness or compassion (e.g. unrelenting police officers)

11

concerted

jointly arranged or carried out; coordinated; done with great effort or determination OR (of music) arranged in several parts of equal importance

12

sedate

calm, dignified, and unhurried OR quiet and dull

13

torture (noun)

the action or practice of inflicting severe pain on someone as a punishment or in order to force them to do or say something OR great physical or mental suffering

14

acoustic

relating to sound or the sense of hearing (e.g. dogs have much greater acoustic range)

15

silhouette

the dark shape and outline of someone or something visible in restricted light against a brighter background OR a representation of someone or something showing the shape and outline only, typically coloured in solid black

16

yield

produce or generate (a result, gain, or financial return OR agricultural products) (e.g. the land yields grapes and tobacco) OR give way to arguments, demands, or pressure (e.g. he yielded to the demands of his partners) OR relinquish possession of (e.g. he yielded up the secret)

17

relinquish

voluntarily cease to keep or claim; give up

18

decipher

convert (a text written in code, or a coded signal) into normal language; understanding, interpreting, or identifying (something) (e.g. encrypted information can only be deciphered by highly talented technicians)

19

haunting

poignant; evocative

20

poignant

evoking a keen sense of sadness or regret

21

evocative

bringing strong images, memories, or feelings to mind

22

morph

undergo or cause to undergo a gradual process of transformation

23

orphan

a child whose parents are dead

24

wrinkle

a slight line or fold in something, especially fabric or the skin of the face

25

wince

make a slight involuntary grimace or shrinking movement of the body out of pain or distress

26

grimace

an ugly, twisted expression on a person's face, typically expressing disgust, pain, or wry amusement

27

cupped

form (one's hand or hands) into the curved shape of a cup (e.g. cupped around the mouth)

28

sheen

a soft lustre on a surface

29

lustre

a gentle sheen or soft glow

30

bead (verb)

cover (a surface) with drops of moisture OR decorate or cover with beads

31

bead (noun)

a small piece of glass, stone, or similar material that is threaded with others to make a necklace or rosary or sewn on to fabric OR a drop of a liquid on a surface (e.g. beads of sweat)

32

mould

a hollow container used to give shape to molten or hot liquid material when it cools and hardens OR a distinctive and typical style, form, or character (e.g. the subtropical mould of Brisbane architecture) (verb: form (an object) out of malleable material)

33

malleable

(of a metal or other material) able to be hammered or pressed into shape without breaking or cracking OR easily influenced; pliable

34

pliable

easily bent; flexible (e.g. quality leather is pliable and will not crack) OR easily influenced (e.g. pliable teenagers mind)

35

foul

offensive to the senses, especially through having a disgusting smell or taste or being dirty OR wicked or immoral; obscene language

36

obscene

offensive or disgusting by accepted standards of morality and decency

37

decency

behaviour that conforms to accepted standards of morality or respectability OR things required for a reasonable standard of life

38

contestant

a person who takes part in a contest or competition

39

devour

eat (food or prey) hungrily or quickly OR read quickly (e.g. she is devouring the book quickly)

40

clang (noun)

a loud, resonant metallic sound or series of sounds

41

clang (verb)

make or cause to make a clang

42

droop

bend or hang downwards limply

43

gory

involving or showing violence and bloodshed

44

bloodshed

the killing or wounding of people, typically on a large scale during a conflict

45

limply

lacking internal strength or structure; not stiff or firm

46

stiff

not easily bent or changed in shape; rigid

47

lurk (verb)

be or remain hidden so as to wait in ambush

48

fraud

wrongful or criminal deception intended to result in financial or personal gain

49

gulp

swallow (drink or food) quickly or in large mouthfuls, often audibly

50

jerk

a quick, sharp, sudden movement (can be verb) (e.g. the van jerked forward)

51

weakling

a person or animal that is physically weak and frail

52

yelp

a short, sharp cry, especially of pain or alarm

53

whoosh

move or cause to move quickly or suddenly with a rushing sound

54

hunk

a large piece of something, especially food, cut or broken off a larger piece (e.g. a hunk of bread)

55

gobble

eat (something) hurriedly and noisily

56

spat

past tense of spit

57

meagre

(of something provided or available) lacking in quantity or quality

58

stagger

walk or move unsteadily, as if about to fall

59

vault

a large room or chamber used for storage, especially an underground one

60

eerie

strange and frightening

61

swirl

move in a twisting or spiralling pattern

62

fend

look after and provide for oneself, without any help from others

63

majestic

having or showing impressive beauty or scale

64

vie (vying)

compete eagerly with someone in order to do or achieve something

65

impart

make (information) known (e.g. the teacher had imparted a wide scope of knowledge to her pupils) OR bestow (a quality)

66

bestow

confer or present (an honour, right, or gift)

67

vilify

speak or write about in an abusively disparaging manner

68

disparaging

expressing the opinion that something is of little worth; derogatory

69

derogatory

showing a critical or disrespectful attitude

70

deride

express contempt for; ridicule

71

contempt

the feeling that a person or a thing is worthless or deserving scorn

72

ridicule

the subjection of someone or something to mockery and derision (e.g. he is held up as an object of ridicule) (verb: subject to mockery and derision)

73

mockery

derision; ridicule

74

daunt

make (someone) feel intimidated or apprehensive

75

florid

having a red or flushed complexion OR excessively intricate or elaborate (e.g. a florid victorian era building)

76

intricate

very complicated or detailed

77

nefarious

(typically of an action or activity) wicked or criminal

78

fickle (adj)

changing frequently, especially as regards one's loyalties or affections (e.g. increasingly fickle public)

79

doff

remove (an item of clothing) (e.g. doffed his jacket)

80

adorn

make more beautiful or attractive

81

imperturbable

unable to be upset or excited; calm

82

solicit

ask for or try to obtain (something) from someone (e.g. don't solicit for money)

83

conspicuous

clearly visible OR conspicuous

84

prosaic

having or using the style or diction of prose as opposed to poetry; lacking imaginativeness or originality

85

prose

written or spoken language in its ordinary form, without metrical structure

86

boisterous

noisy, energetic, and cheerful

87

acrimonious

(typically of speech or discussion) angry and bitter and resenting

88

incredulous

(of a person or their manner) unwilling or unable to believe something

89

quiescent (adj)

in a state or period of inactivity or dormancy

90

dormancy

(of an animal) having normal physical functions suspended or slowed down for a period of time; in or as if in a deep sleep

91

eclectic

deriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources

92

derive

obtain something from (a specified source) (e.g. they derived great comfort from this assurance)

93

incisive

(of a person or mental process) intelligently analytical and clear-thinking; astute

94

ephemeral

lasting for a very short time

95

vindictive

having or showing a strong or unreasoning desire for revenge

96

altruistic

showing a disinterested and selfless concern for the well-being of others; unselfish

97

disinterested

not influenced by considerations of personal advantage OR having or feeling no interest in something; uninterested

98

benevolent

well meaning and kindly (e.g. he was something of a benevolent despot)

99

philanthropic

(of a person or organisation) seeking to promote the welfare of others; generous and benevolent (e.g. they receive financial support from philanthropic bodies)

100

generous

showing a readiness to give more of something, especially money, than is strictly necessary or expected

101

gratuitous

done without good reason (for free); uncalled for (e.g. gratuitous violence) (e.g. gratuitous assistance)

102

affinity

a natural liking for and understanding of someone or something (e.g. he had a special affinity with horses) OR a similarity of characteristics suggesting a relationship, especially a resemblance in structure between animals, plants, or languages (e.g. a semantic affinity between the two words)

103

unwitting

(of a person) not aware of the full facts; not done on purpose; unintentional (e.g. unwitting blunders)

104

brazen

bold and without shame (e.g. he went about his illegal business brazenly)

105

equivocate

use ambiguous language so as to conceal the truth or avoid committing oneself (e.g. the government have equivocated too often in the past)

106

duplicity

deceitfulness

107

sacrosanct

(especially of a principle, place, or routine) regarded as too important or valuable to be interfered with (e.g. Free health care is Australia should be upheld as sacrosanct)

108

solipsistic

the view or theory that the self is all that can be known to exist and matters (selfish; self centred)

109

nihilism

the rejection of all religious and moral principles, often in the belief that life is meaningless

110

reputedly

according to what people say or believe; supposedly (e.g. the iWatch will consist of sapphire glass reputedly.)

111

caustic

able to burn or corrode organic tissue by chemical action (e.g. caustic cleaners) OR sarcastic in a scathing and bitter way (e.g. the players' comments were caustic about the refereeing)

112

discern

recognize or find out (e.g. I can discern no difference between the two policies)

113

discerning

having or showing good judgement

114

raffish

unconventional and slightly disreputable, especially in an attractive way

115

unconventional

not based on or conforming to what is generally done or believed

116

disreputable

not considered to be respectable in character or appearance

117

canard

an unfounded rumour or story

118

unfounded

having no foundation or basis in fact

119

pinion

restrain or immobilise (someone) by tying up or holding their arms or legs (e.g. he was pinioned to the ground)

120

jaded

bored or lacking enthusiasm, typically after having had too much of something

121

quixotic

extremely idealistic; unrealistic and impractical

122

accrue

(of a benefit or sum of money) accumulate and growing increasing amounts over time (e.g. financial benefits will accrue from restructuring)

123

aberration

a departure from what is normal, usual, or expected, typically an unwelcome one (e.g. the violence in the area was an aberration)

124

bellicose

demonstrating aggression and willingness to fight

125

bilk

obtain or withhold money from (someone) unfairly or by deceit; cheat or defraud

126

defraud

illegally obtain money from (someone) by deception

127

bequeath

leave (property) to a person or other beneficiary by a will (e.g. he bequeathed his art collection to the town)

128

beneficiary

a person who derives advantage from something, especially a trust, will, or life insurance policy

129

bemuse

puzzle, confuse, or bewilder

130

capitulate

cease to resist an opponent or an unwelcome demand; yield; surrender (e.g. the enemies capitulated)

131

corroborate

confirm or give support to (a statement, theory, or finding)

132

disparage (adj)

regard as being of little worth (e.g. he never missed an opportunity to disparage his competitors)

133

equanimity

calmness and composure, especially in a difficult situation

134

composure

the state or feeling of being calm and in control of oneself

135

fractious

(typically of children) irritable and quarrelsome

136

foible

a minor weakness or eccentricity in someone's character

137

eccentric

(of a person or their behaviour) unconventional and slightly strange

138

garrulous

excessively talkative, especially on trivial matters

139

insouciant

showing a casual lack of concern

140

shrug

raise (one's shoulders) slightly and momentarily to express doubt, ignorance, or indifference

141

umbrage

offence or annoyance (e.g. he took umbrage at his racism)

142

trite

(of a remark or idea) lacking originality or freshness; dull on account of overuse

143

remark

say something as a comment; mention (e.g. the judges remarked on the high standard of the entries) OR regard with attention; notice (e.g. he remarked the man's eccentric behaviours) (NOUN: a written or spoken comment)

144

tome

a book, especially a large, heavy, scholarly one

145

respite

a short period of rest or relief from something difficult or unpleasant (e.g. a brief respite from the heat)

146

remedial (adj)

giving or intended as a remedy or cure (e.g. remedial surgery)

147

remedy

a medicine or treatment for a disease or injury or to counteracting or eliminating something undesirable (e.g. herbal remedies) (e.g. yelling is an effective remedy for stress)

148

quandary

a state of perplexity or uncertainty over what to do in a difficult situation (e.g. he did not have to astuteness to deal with the quandary)

149

pilfer

steal (things of little value) (e.g. he pilfered a box of tissues)

150

pernicious

having a harmful effect, especially in a gradual or subtle way (e.g. the pernicious influences of the mass media)

151

lugubrious

looking or sounding sad and dismal (e.g. he looked rather lugubrious today)

152

laggard

a person who makes slow progress and falls behind others (ADJ: slower than desired or expected) (e.g. laggard children)

153

waive

refrain from insisting on or using (a right or claim) [give up] (e.g. he will waive all rights to the money) OR refrain from demanding compliance with her tuition fees would be waived

154

refrain

stop oneself from doing something

155

vacillate

waver between different opinions or actions; be indecisive (e.g. he had been vacillating between chocolate and strawberry ice cream and still had yet to make a decision)

156

verbose

using or expressed in more words than are needed (e.g. a dreary and verbose speech by the principal)

157

orthodox (adj)

following or conforming to the traditional or generally accepted rules or beliefs of a religion, philosophy, or practice (e.g. Burke's views were orthodox in his time) (e.g. orthodox remedies)

158

plethora

a large or excessive amount of something (e.g. a plethora of enlistments from Australia)

159

egregious

outstandingly bad; shocking (e.g. it's an egregious decision to shorten the Cross River Rail project)

160

diabolical

characteristic of the Devil, or so evil as to recall the Devil (e.g. diabolical crimes)

161

copious

abundant in supply or quantity (e.g. the supply of food in Northern India was copious during the famine but were sent off to Britain) (e.g. she took copious note)

162

ancillary (adj)

providing necessary support to the primary activities or operation of an organisation, system, etc (secondary) (e.g. ancillary staff) OR in addition to something else, but not as important (e.g. the second chapter of this tome is merely an ancillary to the first chapter)

163

ancillary (noun)

a person whose work provides necessary support to the primary activities of an organization, system, etc. (e.g. employment of ancillaries has now commenced) OR something which functions in a supplementary or supporting role (e.g. the ancillaries of the fuselage are in fact important)

164

circumnavigate

sail all the way around (something, especially the world)

165

boorish

rough and bad-mannered; coarse (boorish behaviours)

166

coarse

rough or harsh in texture OR (of a person or their speech) rude or vulgar

167

vulgar

lacking sophistication or good taste; making explicit and offensive reference to sex or bodily functions; coarse and rude

168

arduous

involving or requiring strenuous effort; difficult and tiring (an arduous career)

169

belligerent

hostile and aggressive (e.g. the mood at the meeting was belligerent) OR engaged in a war or conflict, as recognized by international law (e.g. belligerent countries like North Korea) (NOUN: a nation or person engaged in war or conflict, as recognized by international law) (e.g. belligerents like North Korea)

170

enigma

a person or thing that is mysterious or difficult to understand (e.g. Chemistry is still an enigma to me)

171

insomniac

a person who is regularly unable to sleep (e.g. she is an insomniac) OR regularly unable to sleep (e.g. insomniac person)

172

convoluted

(especially of an argument, story, or sentence) extremely complex and difficult to follow (e.g. according my English teacher, the plots of my story is convoluted)

173

goad

provoke or annoy (someone) so as to stimulate an action or reaction (the fight was goaded by the teacher)

174

hapless

(especially of a person) unfortunate (e.g. the hapless victim that suffered in dismal living conditions for being the working class)

175

moribund

(of a thing) in terminal decline; lacking vitality or vigour (e.g. the moribund industrial market) OR (of a person) at the point of death (e.g. he was moribund at the hospital)

176

terminal

forming or situated at the end or extremity of something (e.g. a terminal date)

177

nemesis

the inescapable agent of someone's or something's downfall (e.g. injury, consistently his nemesis, struck him down during the match) OR a long-standing rival; an arch-enemy (e.g. Kudo Shinichi's nemesis is without a doubt Kaito Kid)

178

dry

(of information, writing, etc.) dully factual (e.g. the dry fact that...) OR unemotional, undemonstrative, or impassive (e.g. dry smile) OR (of a joke or sense of humour) subtle and expressed in a matter-of-fact way

179

agent

a person or thing that takes an active role or produces a specified effect (e.g. agents of environmental change) (e.g. bleaching agents)

180

fiasco

a complete failure, especially a ludicrous or humiliating one (e.g. his plans turned into a fiasco)

181

ludicrous

so foolish, unreasonable, or out of place as to be amusing

182

humiliate/humiliating (adj)

making someone feel ashamed and foolish by injuring their dignity and pride (e.g. I was humiliated when I stuttered during the presentation)

183

ostentatious

characterised by pretentious or showy display; designed to impress

184

pretentious

attempting to impress by affecting greater importance or merit than is actually possessed

185

ascribe

regard something as being due to (a cause) (e.g. he ascribed Jane's short temper to her upset stomach) OR regard a text, quotation, or work of art as being produced by or belonging to (a particular person or period) (e.g. a quotation ascribed to [someone]) OR regard a quality as belonging to (e.g. growth mindset is often ascribed to high achieving and ambitious learners)

186

laconic

(of a person, speech, or style of writing) using very few words (e.g. his laconic reply reveals his disinterests in the subject)

187

terse

sparing in the use of words; abrupt

188

abrupt

sudden and unexpected (e.g. abrupt changes) OR brief to the point of rudeness; curt (e.g. you were rather abrupt with that young man) OR (of a style of speech or writing) not flowing smoothly; disjointed OR steep; precipitous (e.g. the abrupt double peak)

189

epigrammatic

in the style of an epigram; concise, clever, and amusing

190

precipitous

dangerously high or steep OR (of a change to a worse situation or condition) sudden and dramatic (e.g. an abrupt and precipitous drop in accruing money)

191

curt

rudely brief

192

epigram

a pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way; a short poem

193

adroit

clever or skilful (at) (e.g. he was adroit at tax avoidance)

194

endemic

(of a disease or condition or plant or animal) regularly found among particular people or in a certain area [endemic in] OR an endemic plant or animal (e.g. types of Australian endemics)

195

complacency

a feeling of smug or uncritical satisfaction with oneself or one's achievements

196

pundit

an expert in a particular subject or field who is frequently called upon to give their opinions to the public (political pundits)

197

insipid

lacking flavour; weak or tasteless)(e.g. water is insipid) OR lacking vigour or interest (e.g. insipid artworks)

198

tepid

(especially of a liquid) only slightly warm; lukewarm

199

nexus

a connection or series of connections linking two or more things (e.g. the nexus between education and a successful career) OR a connected group or series (e.g. nexus of proposals/ideas)

200

lukewarm

(of liquid or food that should be hot) only moderately warm; tepid OR (of a person, attitude, or action) unenthusiastic (e.g. Britain's lukewarm approach to the issue reveals their disinterests)

201

pandemic (adj)

(of a disease) prevalent over a whole country or the world (e.g. a yet curable pandemic disease)

202

integral

necessary to make a whole complete; essential or fundamental (e.g. games are an integral part of education) OR included as part of a whole rather than supplied separately (e.g. the device comes with integral batteries)

203

covert

not openly acknowledged or displayed (e.g. a convert CIA spy)

204

thicket

a dense group of bushes or trees (e.g. a horned owl perfectly camouflaged in a dense thicket to avoid being preyed on)

205

procure

obtain (something), especially with care or effort (e.g. he procured an iPad through persuading his mum)

206

assail

make a concerted or violent attack on OR (of an unpleasant feeling or physical sensation) come upon (someone) suddenly and strongly (e.g. she was assailed with anxiety) OR criticise strongly (e.g. the team was assailed for their performance)

207

aspersion

an attack on the reputation or integrity of someone or something [e.g. casting aspersion] (e.g. I don't think anyone is casting aspersions on you)

208

interlude

an intervening period of time; an interval OR a thing occurring or done during an interval

209

assiduous

showing great care and perseverance (e.g. she was assiduous in pointing and explaining out every feature)

210

assimilate

take in and understand fully (information or ideas) (e.g. I am trying to assimilate these new vocabularies) OR absorb and integrate (e.g. pop trends are assimilated into the mainstream with alarming speed) (e.g. nutritions assimilated in the body) OR regard as similar; liken (e.g. perceptions are assimilated to thoughts)