blue book #17 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in blue book #17 Deck (85):
1

idyllic

charmingly simple or rustic:
his idyllic life in Tahiti.

2

if

even though:
an enthusiastic if small audience.

3

ignoble

1.
of low character or aims; mean; base:
his ignoble purposes.

2.
of low grade or quality; inferior.

3.
not noble; of humble descent or rank.

4

ignominious

1.
marked by or attended with disgrace and dishonor; discreditable; humiliating:
an ignominious retreat.

2.
bearing or deserving disgrace; contemptible.

5

ilk

family, class, or kind:
he and all his ilk.

6

ill-conceived

badly conceived or planned:
an ill-conceived project.

7

illegible

impossible or hard to read or decipher because of poor handwriting, faded print, etc.:
This letter is completely illegible.

8

illicit

1.
not legally permitted or authorized; unlicensed; unlawful.

2.
disapproved of or not permitted for moral or ethical reasons.

9

illimitable

not limitable; limitless; boundless.

10

illuminate

1.
to supply or brighten with light; light up.

2.
to make lucid or clear; throw light on a subject.

3.
to decorate with lights, as in celebration.

4.
to enlighten, as with knowledge.

5.
to make resplendent or illustrious:
A smile illuminated her face.

6.
to decorate (a manuscript, book, etc.) with colors and gold or silver, as was often done in the Middle Ages.

11

illusory

1.
deceptive; misleading; producing a false or misleading impression of reality.

2.
of the nature of an illusion; unreal.

12

illustrious

1.
highly distinguished; renowned; famous:
an illustrious leader.

2.
glorious, as deeds or works:
many illustrious achievements.

13

imbroglio

1.
a misunderstanding, disagreement, etc., of a complicated or bitter nature, as between persons or nations.

2.
an intricate and perplexing state of affairs; a complicated or difficult situation.

3.
a confused heap.

14

imbue

1.
to impregnate or inspire, as with feelings, opinions, or beliefs:
The new political leader was imbued with the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi.
The use of reverberating metallic sound effects to imbue every other moment with sinister portent gets tedious after a while.

2.
to saturate or impregnate with moisture, color, etc.

15

immaculate

1.
free from spot or stain; spotlessly clean:
immaculate linen.

2.
free from moral blemish or impurity; pure; undefiled.

3.
free from fault or flaw; free from errors:
an immaculate text.

16

immaterial

1.
inconsequential; unimportant:
It was easy to tell the presidential candidate thought that debates, at this stage, were immaterial.

2.
not pertinent; irrelevant.

3.
not material; incorporeal; spiritual.

17

immerse

1.
to plunge into or place under a liquid; dip; sink.

2.
to involve deeply; absorb:
She is totally immersed in her law practice.

3.
to embed; bury.

18

imminent

1.
likely to occur at any moment; impending:
Her death is imminent.

2.
projecting or leaning forward; overhanging.

19

immunity

1.
the state of being immune from or insusceptible to a particular disease or the like.

2.
the condition that permits either natural or acquired resistance to disease.

3.
exemption from obligation, service, duty, or liability to taxation, jurisdiction, etc.:
The ambassador claimed diplomatic immunity when they arrested him for reckless driving.

4.
special privilege.

20

immutable

unchangeable; changeless:
The outraged grammar stickler mistakes a convention for an immutable and fundamental law of the universe.

21

impair

1.
to make or cause to become worse; diminish in ability, value, excellence, etc.; weaken or damage:
to impair one’s health; to impair negotiations:
The liver is one of the few human organs that regenerates, so having pieces removed usually does not impair function.

2.
to grow or become worse; lessen.

22

impartial

not biased; fair; just:
an impartial judge.

23

impasse

1.
a position or situation from which there is no escape; deadlock; standstill:
The impasse between Israel and the Palestinians shows little sign of easing.

2.
a road or way that has no outlet; cul-de-sac.

24

impassioned

filled with intense feeling or passion; passionate; ardent:
His ideas for spring were all familiar tropes – so much so that the collection seemed perfunctory rather than impassioned.

25

impassive

1.
without emotion; apathetic; unmoved:
The high schoolers in the room are impassive, but the fathers give thoughtful frown-nods.

2.
calm; serene.

3.
unconscious; insensible.

4.
not subject to suffering.

26

impeach

1.
to accuse a public official before an appropriate tribunal of misconduct in office.

2.
to challenge the credibility of:
to impeach a witness.

3.
to bring an accusation against.

4.
to call in question; cast an imputation upon:
to impeach a person’s motives.

27

impeccable

1.
faultless; flawless; irreproachable:
impeccable manners; impeccable taste.

2.
not liable to sin; incapable of sin.

28

impediment

1.
obstruction; hindrance; obstacle.

2.
any physical defect that impedes normal or easy speech; a speech disorder.

3.
a bar, usually of blood or affinity, to marriage:
a diriment impediment.

29

impel

1.
to drive or urge forward; press on; incite or constrain to action:
These all-too-possible nightmare scenarios should impel the United States to focus on the current state of Pakistan.

2.
to drive or cause to move onward; propel; impart motion to.

30

imperative

1.
absolutely necessary or required; unavoidable:
It is imperative that we leave.

2.
of the nature of or expressing a command; commanding.

31

imperious

1.
domineering in a haughty manner; arrogant; dictatorial; overbearing:
an imperious manner; an imperious person.

2.
urgent; imperative:
imperious need.

32

impertinent

1.
intrusive or presumptuous, as persons or their actions; insolently rude; uncivil:
a brash, impertinent youth.

2.
not pertinent or relevant; irrelevant:
an impertinent detail.

33

imperturbable

incapable of being upset or agitated; not easily excited; calm:
imperturbable composure.

34

impervious

1.
not permitting penetration or passage; impenetrable:
The coat is impervious to rain.

2.
incapable of being injured or impaired:
impervious to wear and tear.

3.
incapable of being influenced, persuaded, or affected:
impervious to reason; impervious to another’s suffering.

35

impetuous

1.
of, relating to, or characterized by sudden or rash action, emotion, etc.; impulsive:
an impetuous decision; an impetuous person.

2.
having great impetus; moving with great force; violent:
the impetuous winds.

36

impetus

1.
a moving force; impulse; stimulus:
The grant for building the opera house gave impetus to the city’s cultural life.

2.
broadly, the momentum of a moving body, especially with reference to the cause of motion.

37

impinge

1.
to make an impression; have an effect or impact on:
to impinge upon the imagination; social pressures that impinge upon one’s daily life.

2.
to encroach; infringe upon:
to impinge on another’s rights; the new guidelines that impinge on the free-trade agreement.

3.
to strike; dash; collide against:
rays of light impinging on the eye.

38

impious

1.
not pious or religious; lacking reverence for God, religious practices, etc.; irreligious; ungodly.

2.
disrespectful.

39

implacable

not to be appeased, mollified, or pacified; inexorable:
an implacable enemy; the implacable nature of his opposition to the idea.

40

implant

1.
to put or fix firmly; to instill:
to implant sound principles in a child’s mind.

2.
to plant securely.

41

implausible

provoking disbelief; unlikely; not having the appearance of truth or credibility:
an implausible alibi.

42

implement

1.
any article used in some activity, especially an instrument, tool, or utensil:
agricultural implements.

2.
a means; agent:
human beings as an implement of divine plan.

3.
to fulfill; perform; carry out:
Once in office, he failed to implement his campaign promises.

4.
to put into effect according to or by means of a definite plan or procedure.

43

implicate

1.
to show to be also involved, usually in an incriminating manner:
to be implicated in a crime.

2.
to imply as a necessary circumstance, or as something to be inferred or understood.

3.
to connect or relate to intimately; affect as a consequence:
The malfunctioning of one part of the nervous system implicates another part.

4.
to fold or twist together; intertwine; interlace.

44

implicit

1.
implied, rather than expressly stated:
an implicit agreement.

2.
unquestioning or unreserved; absolute:
implicit trust; implicit obedience; implicit confidence.

3.
potentially contained:
to bring out the drama implicit in the occasion.

45

importune

1.
to press or beset with solicitations; demand with urgency or persistence; to harass with repeated requests.

2.
to make improper advances toward a person.

3.
to beg for something urgently or persistently.

46

impose

1.
to lay on or set as something to be borne, endured, obeyed, fulfilled, paid, etc.:
to impose taxes.

2.
to put or set by or as if by authority; to force upon:
to impose one’s personal preference on others.

3.
to obtrude or thrust (oneself, one’s company, etc.) upon others.

4.
to pass or palm off fraudulently or deceptively:
He imposed his pretentious books on the public.

5.
to obtrude oneself or one’s requirements, as upon others:
Are you sure my request doesn’t impose?

6.
to presume, as upon patience or good nature.

47

imposing

very impressive because of great size, stately appearance, dignity, or elegance:
Notre Dame, Rheims, and other imposing cathedrals of France.

48

impotent

1.
not potent; lacking power or ability.

2.
utterly unable to do something.

3.
without force or effectiveness.

49

impound

1.
to shut up in a pound or other enclosure, as a stray animal.

2.
to confine within an enclosure or within limits:
water impounded in a reservoir.

3.
to seize and retain in custody of the law, as a document for evidence.

4.
money, property, etc., that has been impounded:
a sale of impounds by the police department.

50

impoverish

1.
to reduce to poverty:
a country impoverished by war.

2.
to make poor in quality or productiveness; exhaust the strength or richness of:
Bad farming practices impoverished the soil.

51

imprecation

1.
the act of cursing or calling evil upon a person.

2.
a curse; malediction.

52

impregnable

1.
strong enough to resist or withstand attack; not to be taken by force, unconquerable:
an impregnable fort.

2.
not to be overcome or overthrown:
an impregnable argument.

53

impressionable

1.
easily influenced; susceptible:
Headmasters are in a unique position of power to mold the minds of impressionable youths.

2.
capable of being impressed.

54

impromptu

1.
unrehearsed; made or done without previous preparation:
an impromptu address to the unexpected crowds.

2.
suddenly or hastily prepared or made:
an impromptu dinner.

3.
improvised; having the character of an improvisation.

4.
without preparation:
verses written impromptu.

55

improvident

1.
lacking foresight; incautious; unwary; rash:
The old elite worried that the masses were too improvident and seditious.

2.
neglecting to provide for future needs.

56

impudent

1.
of, relating to, or characterized by impertinence or effrontery:
The student was kept late for impudent behavior.

2.
shameless or brazenly immodest.

57

impugn

to challenge a statement as false; to cast doubt upon; to call into question:
No one, I think, will venture to impugn the motives or the purity of the intentions of Miss Heald in taking this step.

58

impulse

1.
the influence of a particular feeling or mental state:
to act under a generous impulse; to strike out at someone from an angry impulse.

2.
sudden, involuntary inclination prompting to action:
to be swayed by impulse.

3.
a psychic drive or instinctual urge.

4.
an impelling action or force, driving onward or inducing motion.

5.
marked by or acting on impulse:
an impulse buyer.

6.
bought or acquired on impulse:
To reduce expenses, shun impulse items when shopping.

59

in absentia

in the absence of the person involved:
He was sentenced in absentia by the court.

60

in medias res

in the middle of events or a narrative:
Epics often begin in medias res.

61

inadvertent

1.
unintentional:
an inadvertent insult; inadvertent hilarity.

2.
not attentive; heedless.

62

inane

1.
lacking sense or significance; silly:
inane questions.

2.
unintelligent; unimaginative; empty.

63

inanimate

1.
not animate; lifeless.

2.
spiritless; sluggish; dull.

3.
denoting objects, concepts, and beings regarded as lacking perception and volition.

64

inapt

not apt or fitting; inappropriate:
The sentences were too long, the metaphors violent and inapt.

65

inasmuch as

1.
in view of the fact that; seeing that; since:
Inasmuch as I have to go anyhow, I’ll pick up the book for you. Inasmuch as they are friends, we can seat them together.

2.
insofar as; to such a degree as.

66

inaugurate

1.
to make a formal beginning of; initiate; commence; begin:
The end of World War II inaugurated the era of nuclear power.

2.
to induct into office with formal ceremonies; install.

3.
to introduce into public use by some formal ceremony:
Airmail service between Washington, D.C., and New York City was inaugurated in 1918.

67

incandescent

1.
glowing or white with heat.

2.
intensely bright; brilliant.

3.
brilliant; masterly; extraordinarily lucid:
an incandescent masterpiece; incandescent wit.

4.
aglow with ardor and purpose:
the incandescent vitality of youth.

68

incarcerate

1.
to imprison; confine; put into jail.

2.
to enclose; constrict closely.

69

incarnate

1.
embodied in flesh; given a bodily, especially a human, form:
a devil incarnate.

2.
personified or typified, as a quality or idea:
chivalry incarnate.

3.
flesh-colored or crimson.

4.
to put into or represent in a concrete form, as an idea:
The building incarnates the architect’s latest theories.

5.
to be the embodiment or type of:
Her latest book incarnates the literature of our day.

6.
to embody in flesh; invest with a bodily, especially a human, form:
a man who incarnated wisdom and compassion.

70

incendiary

1.
used or adapted for setting property on fire:
incendiary bombs.

2.
tending to arouse strife or sedition; inflammatory:
incendiary speeches; an incendiary policy issue.

3.
tending to inflame the senses:
an incendiary extravaganza of music and dance.

4.
a person who stirs up civil strife, violence, etc. for political reasons; an agitator.

71

incense

to inflame with wrath; make angry; enrage.

72

inception

1.
beginning; start; commencement.

2.
in science fiction, the act of instilling an idea into someone’s mind by entering his or her dreams.

73

incessant

continuing without interruption; ceaseless; unending:
an incessant noise; incessant teasing.

74

inchoate

1.
not fully developed; rudimentary; not yet mature:
Their inchoate fury lumped together anger at same-sex marriage, at foreigners and at “the system.”

2.
just begun; incipient:
Though blurred, the economic divide was still manifest, although all of them seemed to feel strong, if inchoate, political fervor.

3.
not organized; lacking order:
an inchoate mass of ideas on the subject.

75

incidental

1.
happening in connection with or resulting from something more important; casual or fortuitous.

2.
incurred casually and in addition to the regular or main amount:
incidental expenses.

3.
of the nature of a circumstance; secondary.

76

incinerate

to burn or reduce to ashes; cremate.

77

incipient

beginning to exist or appear; in an initial stage; nascent:
an incipient cold.

78

incisive

1.
penetrating; cutting; biting; trenchant:
an incisive tone of voice.

2.
remarkably clear and direct; sharp; keen; acute:
an incisive method of summarizing the issue.

3.
adapted for cutting or piercing.

4.
of or relating to the incisors:
the incisive teeth.

79

incite

to stir, encourage, or urge on; stimulate or prompt to action:
to incite a crowd to riot.

80

inclement

1.
(of the weather, the elements, etc.) severe, rough, or harsh; stormy:
an inclement winter; the inclement cold.

2.
not kind or merciful.

81

inclination

1.
a disposition or bent, especially of the mind or will; a liking or preference:
Much against his inclination, he was forced to resign. Your inclination is to give others the benefit of the doubt.

2.
something to which one is inclined:
In sports, his inclination is tennis.

3.
the act of inclining; state of being inclined.

4.
a tendency toward a certain condition, action, etc.:
the door’s inclination to stick.

82

incognito

1.
having one’s identity concealed, as under an assumed name, especially to avoid notice or formal attentions.

2.
with the real identity concealed:
to travel incognito.

83

incommode

1.
to inconvenience or discomfort; disturb; trouble:
I am sorry to incommode you so.

2.
to impede; hinder.

84

incommunicado

(especially of a prisoner) deprived of any communication with others:
The head of al Qaeda was hiding, but he was not incommunicado.

85

incompatible

1.
unable to exist together in harmony:
She asked for a divorce because they were utterly incompatible.

2.
contrary or opposed in character; discordant:
incompatible colors.