BOWLBY'S MONOTROPIC THEORY [attachment explanations] Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in BOWLBY'S MONOTROPIC THEORY [attachment explanations] Deck (14):
1

Why did Bowlby reject learning theory?

He stated that if it was true, infants would readily attach to whoever fed them, which isn't true

2

What type of theory did Bowlby propose instead of learning theory?

An evolutionary theory

3

How does Bowlby's theory explain attachment?

It is an innate system that gives a survival advantage; imprinting and attachment evolved because they protected the young from hazards

4

Why is Bowlby's theory described as monotropic?

It places great emphasis on attachment to one particular caregiver - a primary attachment figure

5

What 2 principles did Bowlby put forwards?

- LAW OF CONTINUITY
- LAW OF ACCUMULATED SEPARATION

6

What is the Law of Continuity?

The more constant and predictable a child's care, the better the quality of their attachment will be

7

What is the Law of Accumulated Separation?

The effects of every separation from the primary attachment figure add up, therefore the 'safest dose is a zero dose'

8

How did Bowlby extend the idea of a critical period from animal studies to humans?

He stated that the infant attachment system is active for 2 years - if an attachment is not formed within this period, they will find it much harder to form one later

9

How did Bowlby alter the idea of a critical period?

He viewed it as more of a sensitive period, where the infant is most likely to form an attachment

10

How does Bowlby's theory explain the formation of an attachment?

- Infants are born with a set of innate cute behaviours called SOCIAL RELEASERS which encourage adult attention and activate the adult attachment system
- Attachment is a reciprocal process where both parties have a predisposition to become attached
- An attachment slowly builds as the infant spends more time with the caregiver

11

What did Bowlby explain the internal working model as?

A mental representation formed by the child of their relationship with their caregiver

12

How does the internal working model affect development?

It is used as a model for what relationships should be like, therefore affecting the child's ability to be a parent themselves

13

What research contradicts the idea of monotropy?

Schaffer and Emerson found that infants form multiple attachments

14

Why is Bowlby's theory socially sensitive?

Monotropy places a great burden on the mother, as the Law of Accumulated Separation states that they should not spend any time away from their infant, pushing mothers into certain lifestyles