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Grafting and Budding > Budding > Flashcards

Flashcards in Budding Deck (16):
1

Chip budding

Chip budding has gradually replaced T-budding as the primary budding method for many woody ornamental trees, shrubs, and fruit trees in many parts of the world. Commercial nurseries have switched to chip budding because of better takes and straighter, more uniform tree growth.

2

Summer/Fall budding

For Summer Budding, budding is done in Mid-July to September, while the rootstock is actively growing and scion bud is dormant. Summer budding is the most important time for field budding fruit and shade trees.
A 1-year-old scion on a 2-year-old rootstock is generally produced in the fall of the year of budding.

3

Flute budding (ring)

Variations on patch budding include flute, ring and I budding.

This is where the bud patch almost circulates the whole rootstock there is only a tiny sliver in which does not completely complete the circle around it.

4

I-budding

Usually done in nursery production. And in containers. Bark must be slipping and active. This is done usually when the bark of rootstock is thicker than budstick. Bud patch is cut in the form of a rectangle of square.

5

Inverted T-budding

This is the same as T-budding only the T is upside or inverted this is done to help with the access of rainfall allowing for the water to easily slip off of the bark without harming the yields within a specific operation.

6

June budding

For June Budding, budding is done the first year as soon as new growth occurs on the rootstock in March to May.
A 1-year-old scion on a 1-year-old rootstock is generally produced in the fall of the year of budding. This is a faster production system, but usually results in a smaller plant.

7

Patch budding

patch budding is that a rectangular patch of bark is completely removed from the rootstock and replaced with a patch of bark of the same size containing a bud of the cultivar to be propagated.
It is widely and successfully used on thick-barked species, such as walnuts and pecans, in which T-budding sometimes gives poor results.

Patch budding requires that the bark of both the rootstock and budstick be slipping easily.

Special knives have been devised to remove the bark pieces from the rootstock and the budstick.

8

Ring budding

Variations on patch budding include flute, ring and I budding.

This is where the bud patch completely circulates the rootstock.

9

Spring budding

For Spring Budding, budding is done as soon as new growth occurs on the rootstock in March to May.
A 1-year-old scion on a 2-year-old rootstock is generally produced in the fall of the year of budding.

10

T-budding (shield budding)

T-budding is widely used by nurserymen in propagating nursery stock of many fruit trees, shade trees, roses, and some ornamental shrubs.
Its use is generally limited to rootstocks that range from 6 to 25 mm (¼ to 1 in.) in diameter and are actively growing so that the bark will separate readily from the wood.

The shield piece is inserted by pushing it downward under the two flaps of bark in the rootstock.

The rubber, being exposed to the sun and air, usually deteriorates eliminating the costs associated with cutting wrapping ties.

The bud should be left exposed when tying T-buds in this manner.

11

Top-budding (top-working)

The process of budding onto an existing rootstock with new scion material. This is usually done with younger trees or smaller shoots of older trees.

12

Wood-in vs. Wood-out

Preparing the shield—with the “wood-in” or with the “wood-out.” This refers to the sliver of wood just under the bark of the shield piece. In budding certain species, such as maples and walnuts, success is usually obtained with “wood-out” buds.

13

Budding

Budding is a form of
grafting in which the scion
consists of a single bud and
a small section of bark with
or without the wood.

Chip budding and T-budding are the two most important types of budding for woody ornamentals and fruit trees.

14

Why budding?

Budding makes very efficient use of scionwood, as only a single bud is needed to propagate a new tree.
A lower number of stockplants is needed to supply scionwood.
Budding may also result in a stronger union, particularly during the first few years, than is obtained by some grafting techniques.

15

Spring, Summer budding

Spring budding (March to May)
June budding (May to June)
Summer budding (July to September)

16

INFORMATIONAL WEBSITE

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/faculty/davies/pdf%20stuff/ph%20final%20galley/M13_DAVI4493_08_SE_C13.pdf