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Flashcards in Captain's Responsibility Deck (31):
1

FOM 3.1.2 Captain


What is the extent of the Captain’s authority?

FOM 3.1.2

The Captain has full control and authority in the operation of the aircraft, without limitation, over other Crew Members and their duties during fight time, whether or not he holds valid certificates authorizing him to perform the duties of those Crew Members.

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FOM 3.1.2

During the enroute portion of a flight, if an unsafe condition (mechanical, weather, passenger eg.) should arise, what does the Captain’s authority allow?

No Captain may allow a flight to continue toward any airport to which it has been dispatched or released if, in the opinion of the Captain or Dispatcher, the flight cannot be completed safely, unless, in the opinion of the Captain, there is no safer procedure. In that event, continuation toward that airport is an emergency situation.

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FOM 3.1.2

During a flight, what are the limits to the Captain’s authority with regard to other crew members onboard during that flight?

FOM 3.1.2

The Captain has full control and authority in the operation of the aircraft, without limitation, over other Crew Members and their duties during flight time, whether or not he holds valid certificates authorizing him to perform the duties of those Crew Members.

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FOM 3.1.2

What are the Captain’s responsibilities for every flight?

FOM 3.1.2

The Captain’s responsibilities include the following:
● Conduct a Crew Briefing that creates a shared mental model and a clear plan of action.
● Promote an environment that solicits open communication.
● Provide instruction to the First Officer, as necessary, to ensure professional growth and proficiency.
● Advise the First Of cer of deviations from established policies, procedures, and/or regulations.
● Exercise joint responsibility with the Dispatcher for the proper preflight planning, planned delays, and Dispatch Release of the flight.
● Verify that weight and balance information, weather information, NOTAMs, flight plan, and Dispatch Release are onboard the aircraft prior to each departure.
● Ascertain that the fuel onboard the aircraft is correct for the specific flight conditions and that it complies with CFR fuel requirements for flight.
● Make the landing anytime an engine is shut down.
● Inform Dispatch of changing conditions that might adversely affect other flights.
● Occupy the left seat at all times. Designated Check Airmen may occupy the right seat.
● Monitor any fueling operation requiring the use of fuel dripsticks to ensure the accuracy of readings according to MEL procedures.
● Perform normal fuel system management (i.e., pump selection and fuel balancing).

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3.2.1 PF/PM Duties and Monitoring Responsibilities

What are the 2 primary roles that Captain and First Officer will occupy during any flight?

3.2.1

PF-Pilot Flying
PM-Pilot Monitoring

Pre flight and post flight Flight Deck Crew duties are divided between the Captain and First Officer. Phase of flight duties are divided between the Pilot Flying (PF) and the Pilot Monitoring (PM).

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FOM 3.2.1

What is the role of the PF?

FOM 3.2.1
Pilot Flying
The PF controls and monitors the aircraft regardless of automation level employed.

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FOM 3.1.2

Who is the PF during ground operations?

FOM 3.1.2

During ground operations, the Captain is the PF. From takeoff to landing, the Captain may assign the PF role to the First Officer

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FOM 3.1.2

What is the role of the PM?

FOM 3.1.2

Pilot Monitoring
The PM supports the PF by monitoring the aircraft and PF actions. During ground operations, the First Officer is the PM.

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FOM 3.1.2

What are the PF phase of flight responsibilities?

FOM 3.1.2

PF phase of flight general responsibilities include:
● Taxiing the aircraft
● Aircraft flight path control— flying assigned courses,
speeds, and altitudes
● Aircraft configuration
● Navigation (including weather avoidance)

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FOM 3.1.2

The PM supports the PF by monitoring the aircraft and PF actions.
What are the phase of Flight responsibilities for the PM?

FOM 3.1.2

Pilot Monitoring
The PM supports the PF by monitoring the aircraft and PF actions. During ground operations, the First Officer is the PM.
The PM phase of ight general responsibilities consist of the following:
● Assisting the PF in developing the plan
● Monitoring, taxiing, flight path, airspeed, aircraft
configuration, and navigation
● Intervening if necessary
● Reading checklists
● Communications
● Tasks assigned or requested by the PF

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FOM 3.2.2

Transfer of aircraft control must be concise and clear. There can be no doubt about who is controlling the aircraft.
How is the transfer of aircraft control initiated?

3.2.2 Transfer of Aircraft Control
(PF)
Therefore, when aircraft control is transferred, announce, “You have the aircraft.” The Pilot assuming aircraft control acknowledges, “I have the aircraft.”

(PM)
Assume aircraft control, when necessary.
If there is a need to take control of the aircraft for safety reasons or required by specific procedures, announce, “I have the aircraft.” The other Pilot acknowledges, “You have the aircraft.”

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FOM 3.3.4 Workload Prioritization and Discretionary Tasks

When is it permissible to perform paperwork pertinent to the flight?

FOM 3.3.4

Paperwork must not be accomplished during taxi, takeoff, approach, landing, or below 10,000 ft MSL except cruise flight below 10,000 ft MSL.

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3.3.4 Workload Prioritization and Discretionary Tasks

Which paperwork tasks are allowed during taxi?

FOM 3.3.4

Necessary performance, weight and balance calculations are allowed during taxi

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FOM 3.3.4

When should discretionary tasks be suspended?

FOM 3.3.4

Suspend all discretionary tasks during dynamic conditions.
Dynamic conditions are defined as:
during ground operations—anytime the parking brake is released; during flight operations—anytime other than steady-state straight and level cruise ight.

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FOM 3.3.5 Sterile Flight Deck and Critical Phases of Flight

When should sterile flight deck rules be observed?

FOM 3.3.5

Follow sterile flight deck rules below 10,000 ft.
Maintain the required sterile flight deck environment during critical phases of flight. Critical phases of flight are defined as operations below 10,000 ft MSL (except on the ground with the brakes set and cruise flight below 10,000 ft MSL). Limit conversations and activities to those required to operate the aircraft.

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3.4.1 Crew Briefing


When should the Captain conduct a crew briefing?


Conduct a preflight briefing with all Crew Members (i.e., the Flight Deck Crew and Cabin Crew), preferably prior to Passenger boarding. If only a partial Crew Briefing is possible, the Captain should delegate the “A” Flight Attendant to brief the others (e.g., “B,” “C,” “D”).

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3.4.1 Crew Briefing

What are the elements of a crew Briefing?

This briefing should include at least the following items:
● Crew verification—Refer to 6.4 Crew Verification Process for
additional information.
● Flight segments—Number of segments the Captain and First Officer
are flying with the Flight Attendants.
● Weather/turbulence—Any anticipated weather or predicted turbulence. Show the WSI SIGMET chart to the Flight Attendants if a hazard area affects the route of ight. Discuss any turbulence or mountain wave activity received from Dispatch with emphasis on times when Flight Attendants should be seated. Refer to 15.3 Turbulence for additional information.
● Delays—Any anticipated delays (e.g., weather, operational).
● Maintenance-related issues (e.g., applicable MELs, Mx Notes,
Passenger convenience items).
● Security considerations—Authorized armed individuals (e.g. LEOS and any other security considerations (e.g. deportees/beligerent Passengers).
● International considerations—Applicable considerations for ights that operate outside CONUS (e.g., rafts, lavatory/potable water, documents, Language of Destination Origin [LODO] Flight Attendants).
Note: LODO Flight Attendants complete the safety announcements in English and Spanish. The time required to brief Passengers during taxi may be longer than domestic ights.

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3.4.2 Captain Briefing

What is The purpose of the Captain Briefing?

The purpose of the Captain Briefing is to review and plan for all phases of flight by developing and establishing a shared mental model between both Pilots. The Captain should review the flight release paperwork and other resources for issues that might affect the flight.

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3.4.2 Captain Briefing


When should the Captain Briefing be completed?

The Captain Briefing must be completed prior to beginning the Before Start—Originating/Before Start checklist.

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3.4.2 Captain Briefing


What are the elements of the Captain Briefing?

● Assign PF/PM Duties—Who will fly. Consider restrictions
(e.g., HGS requirements, New Hire restrictions).
● Station Information Page (SIP)—Applicable operational.
considerations for departure and destination airports.
● Alternates—Departure and destination.
● Special airports (e.g., CFIT avoidance, special procedures).
● MEL items—Applicable operational considerations.
● NOTAMs.
● Adverse weather—Discuss appropriate course of action
(e.g., avoidance, Precautionary Takeoff Pro le).
● Taxi routing/hotspots/Surface Movement Guidance and Control
System (SMGCS)—Brief the expected taxi routing, applicable
hotspots, SMGCS, and any additional considerations depicted
on the Jeppesen -6/-9 page (10-6/10-9 or equivalent).
● Runway conditions (e.g., RCC, clutter/contamination).
Rejected takeoff considerations—Any conditions that adversely affect
the aircraft during a rejected takeoff (e.g., adverse weather, runway
conditions, MEL items).

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3.4.3 Pilot Flying Briefing

What is the purpose of the Pilot Flying Briefing?


The purpose of the Pilot Flying Briefing is to review and plan for the takeoff and departure, with specifics, unique to that leg. Both Pilots actively participate and review any new or previously briefed risk factors.

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3.4.3 Pilot Flying Briefing

What are the elements of the Pilot Flying Briefing?

(PF) Brief the following:
● Clearance—Review the assigned ATC clearance and resolve
any discrepancies.
● MCP and VHF NAV radio—
– Verify MCP and NAV radios are set for the departure.
– For runways with an engine failure procedure, ensure the appropriate VOR/ILS frequency and course are set (HGS-required takeoffs: N/A).
● FMC route—
– Brief the planned runway, assigned departure, transition, and initial en route waypoint by referencing the resources available to the Flight Deck Crew (e.g., Jeppesen charts, SIPs).
– To verify proper programming, the Pilot Flying reads the waypoint sequence and restrictions from the FMC, while the Pilot Monitoring crosschecks the appropriate chart.
– When an ATC clearance does not contain an en route portion (e.g., SID to a STAR), brief the assigned arrival and transition from the FMC by reviewing each waypoint on the LEGS page before departure.
– For non-charted departures, review the initial heading or course, applicable restrictions to altitudes and turns, NAV setup, and DME restrictions.
– Manage discontinuities. Refer to B737 AOM 4.9.2 Managing
Discontinuities
● Automation and navigation—Whenever there are multiple options, brief planned engagement of LNAV, VNAV, or other navigation modes. If the plan is not clearly covered by FOM normal procedures, the Pilot Monitoring should be made aware of how the Pilot Flying intends to y the aircraft.
● HGS takeoff—
– Discuss whether HGS takeoff is required (i.e., RVR below 500).
– Review HGS takeoff set-up requirements. Refer to B737NG AOM 9.2.7 HGS Takeoff and Departure or B737MAX AOM 9.2.7 HGS Takeoff and Departure for procedures and speci c information.
● Required minimum climb gradient—If applicable, brief the required minimum climb gradient for the planned and alternate runways and/or departure procedures. This information may be included in the SID and/or Jeppesen -9A page.
Note: If a runway or departure other than the planned runway or departure is assigned and not previously briefed, reassess any required minimum climb gradient.
● Engine failure procedure—
– PWB ACARS engine failure procedures take precedence over the
Jeppesen 10-7 series page.
– For an engine failure after V1, discuss the planned airport or runway for the return. Refer to B737NG AOM 17.5 PWB Engine Failure Procedures or B737MAX AOM 17.5 Engine Failure Procedures for more information.
● Transition altitude (if other than 18,000 ft).


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3.4.3 Pilot Flying Briefing

When should the Pilot Flying Briefing be reaccomplished?

Note: The Captain may wish to amend or revise some of these briefing items before takeoff.
Note: Re-accomplish the Pilot Flying BrieFong if an amended clearance is received, or if changes are made to FMC programming or takeoff performance prior to completion of the Before Push checklist.

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3.4.4 Arrival Briefing

When should the Arrival Briefing be accomplished?

The Arrival Briefing should be completed prior to the top of descent during a period of low task load, or on the ground for short ights that contain routing from a SID to a STAR.

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3.4.4 Arrival Briefing

What is the purpose of the Arrival Briefing?

The purpose of the Arrival Briefing is for the Pilot Flying to review and plan the descent, approach, landing, and taxi-in phases, with specifics unique to that leg.

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3.4.4 Arrival Briefing

What items should accomplished in the Arrival Briefing?

Brief all relevant items on the STAR and Instrument Approach by referencing the resources available to the Flight Deck Crew (e.g., Jeppesen charts, SIPs, MEL, weather packet).

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3.4.4 Arrival Briefing

What are the components of the Arrival Briefing?

(PF) Complete the following briefing:

● STAR/transition—
– Brief the assigned arrival, transition, and expected runway referencing the resources available to the Flight Deck Crew (e.g., Jeppesen charts, SIPs).
– FMC route—To verify proper programming, the Pilot Flying reads the waypoint sequence and restrictions from the FMC, while the Pilot Monitoring crosschecks the appropriate chart.
– Review any additional considerations, including complex arrival restrictions, or any other situations where it is necessary to review or de ne Flight Deck Crew responsibilities.
● Altitude/speed restrictions—Verify altitude and speed restrictions.
● Transition level—Brief non-standard transition levels (e.g., MMMX/MEX,
TNCA/AUA).
● Adverse weather—Discuss appropriate course of action (e.g., avoidance, windshear).
● NOTAMs.
● SIP—
– Brief any applicable operational considerations for the destination airport.
– Review noise abatement.
● Special airports (e.g., CFIT avoidance, special procedures).
● MEL items—Discuss any MELs that affect aircraft operations.
● Approach (type)—For more information, refer to 3.4.4.1 Approaches, which includes visual and instrument approaches.
● Flaps.
● Braking—Discuss autobrake setting/disengagement/cooling.
● Touchdown point/exit plan.
● LAHSO procedures.
● Transfer of aircraft control.
● Taxi routing/hotspots/SMGCS—Brief the expected taxi routing, applicable hotspots, SMGCS, and any additional considerations depicted on the Jeppesen -6/-9 page (10-6/10-9 or equivalent).

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3.4.4.1 Approaches

When should a Visual Approach and call outs be used?

Under VMC, or anytime ATIS indicates “Visual Approaches,” Flight Crews must reference a charted procedure to back up the visual approach.

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3.4.4.1 Approaches

What items should be briefed for a Visual Approach?

At a minimum, the Pilot Flying briefs the following items from the Jeppesen chart:
● Final approach course
● Navaid frequency on the charted approach
● Runway lighting
● Runway touchdown zone elevation (TDZE)
If conditions require flying some portion of a charted instrument approach procedure due to weather, or the ATIS indicates instrument approaches in use, complete the following:
● Brief those portions of the instrument approach procedure that will achieve visual landing criteria. For example, if an undercast cloud deck prevents a visual approach own directly from the arrival, brief and y the portions of the published instrument approach that will take the aircraft to visual approach conditions.
● Upon receiving ATC clearance for a visual approach, use visual approach rules through landing or go-around. Some airports mandate instrument arrivals to visual approaches regardless of weather conditions.
For example, LAX ATIS typically directs, ‘expect ILS to 24R and 25L, visual approaches to all runways.’ For these airports, expect to fly the charted instrument approach and missed approach unless cleared by ATC for a visual. Then, visual approach rules apply.

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3.4.4.1 Approaches

When should the flight crew brief for an Instrument Approach?

A full instrument approach briefing is required when any of the following criteria apply:
● The runway is not expected to be in sight by the FAF/GSIA.
● Rain is reported or visible in the airport vicinity.
● Signi cant weather is reported or apparent in the airport vicinity (e.g., thunderstorms, fog, blowing dust, snow).
● Restricted visibility is reported or apparent in the airport vicinity (e.g., haze, mist, low sun angles).

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3.4.4.1 Approaches

What items should be briefed for an Instrument Approach?

Brief the following items in the instrument approach briefing, as applicable:
● Approach Chart—
– Identification (i.e., page number, chart name, runway, effective date).
– Waypoint sequence and restrictions—Verify proper FMC programming.
– FAF or GSIA (e.g., altitude check).
– DA, DDA, or MDA.
– Runway and approach lighting—Brief the names of the lighting and what the lighting will look like on nal approach. Emphasize the following:
○ Type of lead-in lighting (i.e., steady, ashing)
○ Centerline lighting (e.g., none, centerline lights, full touchdown zone lights)
○ VASI/PAPI location and type
Note: For non-precision approaches, brief where the runway is expected to be when breaking out of the weather.
● CFIT avoidance—Review minimum safe altitudes, terrain, and obstacles.
● NAV radio set up—Set the navaid frequency, nal approach course, and marker beacon.
● EFIS Control Panel MINS Selector-BARO or RADIO (Special Authorization CAT I, CAT II, or CAT III).
● Applicable NOTAMs, FDC NOTAMs, eld conditions, and special notes.
● RNP Availability Forecast (RAF).
● Current airport temperature is within charted maximum and minimum temperature limitations for uncompensated Baro-VNAV procedure.
If planning an RNAV (RNP) or RNAV (GPS) approach, program the FMC and brief additional RNAV approach procedures. Refer to B737NG AOM 4.9.4 Arrival Programming or B737MAX AOM 4.9.4 Arrival Programming.
(CA) If planning an HGS approach, program the HGS Control Panel (HCP) or MCDU HGS menu and brief HGS procedures.
The appropriate Reference Card may be used to assist meeting the programming and brie ng requirements.
For a go-around/missed approach, review the following:
● Missed approach point and procedure.
● Planned use of automation.
● Non-standard items (e.g., full go-around thrust needed to meet non-standard missed approach climb gradient).