Ch 4: Autoimmune Q & A Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Ch 4: Autoimmune Q & A Deck (16):
1

What is the most important diagnostic autoantibodies in SLE?

Antinuclear antibodies:1) to dsDNA
2) to Sm (Smith) antigen (spliceosome)

2

What autoantibodies are diagnostic for rheumatoid arthritis?

anti-rheumatoid factor antibodies

3

What autoantibodies are seen in small vessel vascultitis (Wegener granulomatosis)?

antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (aka ANCA)

5

Signs and Symptoms of SLE?

Pt presents with 3 month hx: malaise, joint pain, weight loss, sporadic fever

PE: macular rash, erythematous pink plaques w/telangiectatic vessels, oral ulcers, nonblanching purpuric papules on her legs

Labs: elevated BUN, creatinine

6

What happens to complement proteins in SLE?

Reduced during active phase of SLE
Hypocomplementemia b/c of antigen-Ab complexes formed in circulation
Binding of complement to these immune complexes

7

Pt presents with 3 month hx: malaise, joint pain, weight loss, sporadic feverPE: macular rash, erythematous pink plaques w/telangiectatic vessels, oral ulcers, nonblanching purpuric papules on her legsLabs: elevated BUN, creatinineDDx?

SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus)

8

Type III Hypersensitivity responses are characterized by what 3 processes?

1) immune complex deposition
2) complement fixation
3) localized inflammation

9

What 3 immunopathogenic diseases are most clearly attributable to the deposition of immune complexes?

1) SLE
2) rheumatoid arthritis
3) varieties of glomerulonephrities

10

What 3 autoantibodies are specific for scleroderma?

1) nucleolar autoantibodies, against RNA pol primarily
2) antibodies to Scl-70 (a topoisomerase), common and specific, 70% of pts
3) anticentromere antibodies, “CREST” variant of scleroderma

11

What can give rise to a Type III Hypersensitivity response? (In general)

Antibody against a circulating antigen or an antigen deposited in a tissue

12

What autoantibodies are seen in primary Sjogren Syndrome? What is the main difference in manifestion from SS?

autoantibodies to soluble nuclear nonhistone proteins (antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La)
AKA (anti-ribonucleoprotein antibodies to SS-A and SS-B)

more severe glandular and extraglandular manifestations in primary SS

13

What autoantibodies are seen in primary Sjogren Syndrome? What is the main difference in manifestion from SS?

autoantibodies to soluble nuclear nonhistone proteins (antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La)
AKA (anti-ribonucleoprotein antibodies)

more severe glandular and extraglandular manifestations in primary SS

14

What autoantibodies are seen in Sjogren Syndrome (SS)?

antinuclear antibodies directed against DNA or nonhistone proteins

15

An autoimmune disorder characterized by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia in absence of other CT disease

Sjogren Syndrome

16

What characterizes mixed connective tissue disease?

anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein antibody
Unlike SLE, no antibodies to Sm antigen or dsDNA
May have symptoms of scleroderma or rheumatoid arthritis

*Raynaud’s: pallor, paresthesias, pain due to intermittent ischemia of fingers

17

What is a mediator of vasculitis in pts with polyarteritis nodosa?

immune complexes