Chapter 8a. Latin to English Flashcards Preview

Wheelock's Latin Translation > Chapter 8a. Latin to English > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 8a. Latin to English Deck (44):
1

1. Tempora nostra nunc sunt mala; vitia nostra, magna.

1. Our times now are evil; our faults (are) great.

2

2a. Quārē soror mea uxōrī tuae litterās scrībit?

2a. Why is my sister writing a letter to your [sg.] wife?

3

2b. Quārē soror mea uxōrī tuae litterās scrībet?

2b. Why will by sister write a letter to your [sg.] wife?

4

2c. Quārē soror mea uxōrī tuae litterās scrībēbat?

2c. Why was my sister writing a letter to your [sg.] wife?

5

3a. Tyrannus populum stultum ē terrā vestrā dūcet.

3a. The autocrat will lead (his) stupid people out of your [pl.] land.

6

3b. Tyrannus populum stultum ē terrā vestrā dūcit.

3b. The autocrat is leading (his) stupid people out of your [pl.] land.

7

3c. Tyrannus populum stultum ē terrā vestrā dūcēbat.

3c. The autocrat was leading (his) stupid people out of your [pl.] land.

8

4. Ubi satis ratōnis animōrumque in hominibus erit?

4. Where [or “when”] will there be enough (of) reason and spirit [lit. plural] in humans?

9

5. Cōpia vērae virtūtis multās culpās superāre poterat.

5. An abundance of true virture was able to overcome many faults.

10

6. In līberā cīvitāte adulēscentiam agēbāmus.

6. We spent our youth [= young manhood] in a free city.

11

7. Regem malum tolerāre numquam dēbēmus.

7. We should never tolerate an evil king.

12

8. Post parvam moram multa verba dē īnsidiīs scrīptōrum stultōrum scrībēmus.

8. After a small delay we will write many words about the plots of stupid writers.

13

9. The body will remain there under the ground.

9. Corpus ibi manēbit sub terrā.

14

10a. Write [sg.] many (things) in your [sg.] books about the glory of our state.

10a. Scrībe multa in librīs tuīs dē glōriā cīvitātis nostrae.

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10b. Write [pl.] many (things) in your [pl.] books about the glory of our state.

10b. Scrībite multa in librīs vestrīs dē glōriā cīvitātis nostrae.

16

11. Does reason always lead your [pl.] queen to virtue?

11. Ratiōne semper dūcit regīnam vestram ad virtūtem?

17

12. We shall always see many Greek names there.

12. Sember vidēbimus ibi multa nōmina Graeca.

18

13. Frāter meus vītam in ōtiō semper aget.

13. My brother will lead his life in leisure.

19

14a. Age, age! Iuvā mē!

14a. Come on! [sg.] Come on! Help [sg.] me!

20

14b. Dūc mē ad secundum fīlium meum.

14b. Lead [sg.] me to my second son.

21

15. Ō amīcī, lībertātem perdimus.

15. O friends, we are losing freedom.

22

16. Nova perīcula populō Romānō expōnam sine morā.

16. I will explain the new dangers to the Roman people without delay.

23

17. Numquam perīculum sine perīculō vincēmus.

17. We will never defeat danger without danger.

24

18. Ex meīs errōribus hominibus rēctum iter dēmōnstrāre possum.

18. On account of [use ex] my errors I am able to show to people a straight road.

25

19. Catullus Marcō Tulliō Cicerōnī magnās grātiās agit.

19. Catullus gives many [lit. “great”] thanks to Marcus Tullius Cicero.

26

20. Eximia fōrma virginis oculōs hominum convertit.

20. The extraordinary looks of the maiden attracts the eyes of people.

27

21a. Agamemnon magnās cōpiās ē terrā Graecā ad Trōiam dūcet,

21. Agamemnon will lead many troops from the land (of) Greece to Troy.

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21b. ubi multōs virōs necābit.

21b. where he will murder many men.

29

22. Amor laudis hominēs trahit.

22. Love of praise draws people.

30

23. Auctōrēs pācis Caesar cōnservābit.

23. Caesar will preserve the authors of peace.

31

24. Inter multās cūrās labōrēsque carmina scrībere nōn possum.

24. In the midst of many cares and toils I am not able to write poems [lit. “songs”].

32

25a. Dum in magnā urbe dēclāmās, mī amīce,

25a. While you are declaiming in the great city, my friend [sg.],

33

25b. scrīptōrem Trōiānī bellī in ōtiō relegō.

25b. I am re-reading the author of the Trojan war at (my) leisure.

34

26. Nōn vītae, sed scholae, discimus.

26. We learn not for life, but for leisure.

35

27. Hominēs, dum docent, discunt.

27. People, while they teach, learn.

36

28. Ratiō mē dūcet, nōn fortūna.

28. Reason will lead me, not fortune.

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29. Cīvitās bellum sine causā aut propter īram gerere nōn debet.

29. A city should not wage war without a reason or on account of anger.

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30. Sī fortūnās et agrōs vītāsque populī nostrī sine bellō dēfendere poterimus,

30. If we can [future] defend the fortunes and the fields and [use -que] the lives of our people without war,

39

31. tum pācem cōnservāre dēbēbimus;

31. then we will be able to preserve peace;

40

32. sī, autem, nōn poterimus esse salvī ...

32. if, however, we cannot [future] be secure ...

41

33. et servāre pātriam lībertātemque nostram sine bellō,

33. and (cannot) defend (our) country and our freedom without war,

42

34. bellum erit necessarium.

34. war will be necessary.

43

35. Semper dēbēmus dēmōnstrāre, tamen, magnum officium in bellō,

35. We should always display, however, great (attention to) duty in war,

44

36. et magnam clēmentiam post victōriam.

36. and (we should always display) great clemency after victory.

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