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1

The normal extensibility of all soft tissues that allow full range of motion of a joint

Flexibility

2

What is developed when clients demonstrate poor flexibility

Relative flexibility

3

The body’s ability to produce, reduce, and stabilize forces in all three planes of motion

Neuromuscular efficiency

4

The process when neural impulses that sense tension are greater than the impulses that cause muscles to contract, providing an inhibitory effect to the muscle spindles

Autogenic inhibition

5

What are the 8 reasons for the incorporation of flexibility training

Correct muscle imbalances; increase joint range of motion; decrease tension of muscles; relieve joint stress; improve extensibility; maintain normal functional length of muscles; improve optimum neuromuscular efficiency; improve function

6

What is the repair process initiated by dysfunction within the connective tissue of the kinetic chain that is treated by the body as injury

Cumulative injury cycle

7

The tendency of the body to seek the path of least resistance during functional movement patterns

Relative flexibility

8

The concept of muscle inhibition, caused by a tight agonist, which inhibits its functional antagonist

Altered reciprocal inhibition

9

Altered reciprocal inhibition, synergistic dominance, and arthrokinetic dysfunction all lead to what

Muscle imbalance

10

Consistently repeating the same pattern of motion, which may place abnormal stresses on the body

Pattern overload

11

Law that states soft tissue models along lines of stress

Davis’s law

12

What are the 3 phases of the integrated flexibility continuum

Corrective flexibility, active flexibility, functional flexibility

13

The type of flexibility designed to improve extensibility of soft tissue and increase neuromuscular efficiency by using reciprocal inhibition

Active flexibility

14

What are two techniques used in corrective flexibility

Static stretching and SMR

15

What stretching technique uses agonist and synergist muscles to move a limb through its entire range of motion while stretching the functional agonist

Active-isolated stretching

16

What stretching technique uses functional movement to move the body through a full range of motion at realistic speeds

Dynamic stretching

17

What type of flexibility is developed during phase 1 of the OPT model

Static stretching

18

Which stretching technique is used during phases two, three, and four of the OPT model

Active-isolated stretching

19

Which stretching technique is used during phase 5 of the OPT model

Dynamic stretching

20

Stretching technique that focuses on the neural system and fascial system of the body by applying gentle force to an adhesion

SMR

21

What is the minimum amount of time static stretches should be held

30 seconds

22

What are three things a client should have established prior to incorporating dynamic stretching into program

Good levels of tissue extensibility, core stability, balance capabilities

23

What is the minimum duration pressure that should be sustained on adhesions while performing SMR

30 seconds

24

Which heart rate training zone builds aerobic base and aids in recovery

Zone 1

25

Which heart rate training zone increases endurance and trains the anaerobic threshold

Zone 2

26

Which heart rate training zone builds high-end work capacity

Zone 3

27

What prepares body and mind for physical activity, increases heart and respiration rates, increases body temperature

The warm-up

28

What workout component consists of movement activities that get heart rate up, such as walking on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike

General warm-up

29

What workout component consist of stretching movements that mimic the activity to be performed later in the work out

Specific warm-up

30

What are some general warm-up recommendations

5 to 10 minutes at low to moderate intensity

31

What are the warm-up steps for a stabilization-level client

SMR, static stretching, 5 to 10 minutes light cardio

32

What are the warm-up steps for a strength-level client

SMR, active-isolated stretching, 5 to 10 minutes light cardio

33

What are the warm-up steps for a power-level client

SMR, 3 to 10 dynamic stretches

34

What are three reasons to perform cardiorespiratory exercise

Lose weight, reduce stress, improve health

35

What is the often overlooked segment of a workout that provides the body with a smooth transition from exercise back to a steady state of rest

Cool-down

36

What are some suggested steps for cool-down

5 to 10 minutes light cardio, SMR, static stretching

37

For what does the FITTE principle for cardiorespiratory exercise stand

Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type, Enjoyment

38

What is the recommended frequency for cardiorespiratory training

General health: daily, for small quantities of time, at moderate intensity
To improve fitness: 3-5 days per week at high intensity

39

The level of demand that activity places on the body

Intensity

40

What uses the Borg scale to rate how hard one is training

Rating of perceived exertion

41

An informal method used to gauge exercise training intensity

Talk test

42

What stage improves cardio fitness levels using HR zone 1

Stage 1

43

What stage is best for people with low-to-moderate cardio fitness levels who are ready to begin training at higher intensity, moves in and out of zones one and two, intro to interval training

Stage II

44

For advanced exercisers, what stage uses all three heart rate zones for maximal cardio respiratory improvement, used at power level, includes HIIT

Stage III

45

With what stage should stage II training alternate every other day

Stage I

46

Stage II intervals should have what work: rest ratio

Start with 1:3, progress to 1:2 and eventually 1:1

47

What is just as beneficial as traditional cardio for health

Circuit training

48

Which structures make up the core

Lumbo-pelvic-hip complex, including the lumbar spine, the pelvic girdle, abdomen, and the hip joint

49

What are the structures of the LPHC

Lumbar spine, pelvic girdle, abdomen, hip joint

50

Which muscles directly attach to the vertebrae and stabilize the spine

Local stabilization musculature

51

Pulling the navel toward the spine to increase core stability

Drawing-in maneuver

52

What is the reflex that realigns the eyes by anteriorly rotating the pelvis when the cervical spine is in extension

Pelvic-ocular reflex

53

Co-contraction of core movement muscles to increase LPHC stability

Abdominal bracing

54

What are four core exercises in the strength level

Ball crunch; back extensions; reverse crunch; cable rotations

55

Which characteristics help identify exercises in the core-stabilization level

Involve little motion through the spine and pelvis

56

What are four core-stabilization exercises

Marching, floor bridge, floor prone cobra, prone iso-abs

57

What are four core-power exercises

Rotation chest pass, ball medicine ball pullover throw, front medicine ball oblique throw, soccer throw

58

Core-power exercises are easily identified by:

Explosive movements with medicine ball

59

Exercises with little to no motion of the spine and pelvis used to improve neuromuscular efficiency and intravertebral stability

Core-stabilization

60

What are three primary goals of a core training program

Develop neuromuscular efficiency, intravertebral and LPHC stability, and functional strength

61

On what should core training focus

Quality of movement

62

What is the primary goal of core-power training

Develop the ability to stabilize and generate force at functionally applicable speeds