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SAT Vocabulary > D > Flashcards

Flashcards in D Deck (62):
0

Daunting

Discouraging through fear, alarming, intimidating.

Climbing Mt. Everest is a DAUNTING task.

1

Dearth

An inadequate supply, lack.

There's a DEARTH of water in the desert.

2

Debilitating

To make weak or feeble, crippling, disabling.

George suffered a DEBILITATING injury that ended his dancing career.

3

Debunk

To expose as false, disprove.

Stephen's favorite TV show is one that tries to DEBUNK urban legends.

4

Decorous

Having proper dress, speech, or behavior, respectable.

The school dance would have been fun if it were less DECOROUS.

5

Decry

To denounce as faulty or worthless, denigrate.

A staunch conservative, Ray DECRIES tax increases.

6

Deferential

Showing deference or respect, considerate.

Paul gives DEFERENTIAL treatment to kids and elderly people.

7

Deficient

Lacking in some characteristic or trait, defective, inadequate.

The con artist was DEFICIENT in honesty and conscience.

8

Definitive

Complete, satisfying all criteria, absolute.

There's no DEFINITIVE answer as to which came first, the chicken or the egg.

9

Dejected

Depressed in spirit, disheartened.

Cathy was DEJECTED after being passed for a promotion.

10

Deleterious

Harmful or injurious.

I'd rather not find out what DELETERIOUS effects drinking absinthe would have.

11

Demeanor

Conduct, behavior, deportment.

Walt's calm DEMEANOR puts everyone at ease.

12

Demise

Death or decrease, end.

Video caused the DEMISE of the radio star.

13

Demure

Shyness or modesty, reserved.

Shelly's DEMURE appearance is deceiving: she's more wild than any of us.

14

Denounce

To condemn openly or publicly, censure.

After stealing from his clients, the investor was DENOUNCED as a fraud.

15

Denuded

To make naked or bare, strip.

Since our state's water shortage has essentially DENUDED our yard, we're putting in a rock garden instead.

16

Depict

To represent or characterize, portray.

Movies often DEPICT superheroes as victims of weird scientific accidents.

17

Deplore

To regret deeply or strongly, lament.

Patrick DEPLORES reality television, but I secretly like it.

18

Depravity

Moral corruption, debauchery.

There was such DEPRAVITY in the community, we had to move away.

19

Deprecate

To express disapproval, belittle.

Emily's self-DEPRECATING jokes were more sad than funny.

20

Deride

Having or expressing contempt or mocking, laugh at.

The world had fun DERIDING Britney's bad haircut.

21

Despondent

Profound hopelessness, depressed.

Elizabeth was DESPONDENT over dropping her engagement ring in the sewer.

22

Detached

Separated or disinterested, unemotional.

A good manager, Ted stays DETACHED from his employees' personal drama.

23

Devoid

Not possessing, lack.

After three hours at the gym, Don was DEVOID of all energy.

24

Diatribe

A bigger attack or criticism, tirade.

After reading our essays, our teacher went on a DIATRIBE about verb tense.

25

Didactic

Inclined to teach or lecture too much, academic, preachy.

The professor's DIDACTIC speaking style put the class to sleep.

26

Differentiate

To perceive the difference between, discern, discriminate.

It's sometimes difficult to DIFFERENTIATE between pepperoni and salami.

27

Diffident

Lacking self-confidence, hesitant.

Pam's DIFFIDENT demeanor is characterized by her shuffling walk and lack of eye contact.

28

Digression

Something that strays from the central theme or idea, tangent.

Mr. Doty's DIGRESSIONS are entertaining, though completely off-topic.

29

Dilatory

Tending to delay or procrastinate, dallying, delaying.

Kristin took a few DILATORY steps toward the dentist's office before running away.

30

Dilemma

A difficult situation or problem, crisis.

Figuring out how to tell Andy he wasn't invited to the party proved to be a bit of a DILEMMA.

31

Diligent

Attentive and persistent, careful, painstaking.

Katie's DILIGENT record-keeping always helps at tax time.

32

Discern

To perceive or recognize, distinguish, differentiate.

I couldn't DISCERN the point of the book, even after reading it twice.

33

Disconsolate

Hopelessly unhappy.

The campers were DISCONSOLATE when they discovered bears had destroyed their tent.

34

Discord

Lack of harmony, dissent.

Conversations between Maria and her sisters often turn from peace to DISCORD without warning.

35

Discredit

To injure the credit or reputation of, disprove, rebut.

In order to DISCREDIT the eye witness's testimony, the attorney proved that the witness needed glasses.

36

Discretion

Freedom of judgment or choice.

Use your DISCRETION when deciding whether or not to discuss your financial compensation with a coworker.

37

Discrimination

Treatment against a particular group, inequality, prejudice.

DISCRIMINATION based on race or religion is against the law.

38

Disdain

A feeling of contempt or scorn.

Four year old Drew shows his DISDAIN for vegetables by throwing them.

39

Disgruntled

Displeased and discontented, dissatisfied.

The DISGRUNTLED employees plotted against their boss.

40

Dismay

To cause to lose courage or resolution out of fear or anxiety, appall, daunt.

The loss of his dog DISMAYED Bradley so much that he could only sit in shock.

41

Dismissive

Indicating dismissal or rejection, indifferent, unconcerned.

Jackie is DISMISSIVE of shoes without designer labels.

42

Disparage

To belittle, or bring reproach or discredit upon, mock, ridicule.

The athlete DISPARAGED his entire sport with his blatant abuse if performance-enhancing drugs.

43

Disparity

Lack of similarity or equality, difference.

There's sometimes a DISPARITY between what's right and what's easy.

44

Dispassionate

Devoid of feeling or bias, impartial.

The DISPASSIONATE judge heard the case without becoming emotional.

45

Dispel

To drive off; to eliminate, disperse, dissipate.

Michael's changed appearance made it impossible for him to DISPEL the rumors of plastic surgery.

46

Disposition

Natural outlook or mood, character, temperament.

Ursula's sunny DISPOSITION earned her the most friendly award.

47

Disseminate

To scatter or spread widely, disperse.

It's irritating when people DISSEMINATE flyers on the windshields of parked cars.

48

Dissent

To disagree or act against.

The paper printed letters that DISSENTED from the mayor's new policies.

49

Dissolution

Breaking into fragments or parts, disintegration.

Nathan lived on his boat for a year after the DISSOLUTION of his marriage.

50

Distinction

Marking off or distinguishing as different, separation, differentiation.

The only DISTINCTION between the twins is the freckle on Cassie's nose.

51

Distinguish

To mark as different, differentiate.

I can't DISTINGUISH between my black and brown shoes and sometimes wear one of each.

52

Divergent

Moving apart from a common point, differing, deviating.

There were three DIVERGENT paths, so we each followed one to see where they went.

53

Diversion

To turn aside from a purpose, detour, digression.

A water fight seemed the perfect DIVERSION after hours of washing cars.

54

Diversity

Of different kind, form, or character, variety, assortment.

The community center celebrates economic, social, and racial DIVERSITY.

55

Divisive

Creating division or discord, disruptive.

The contest had a DIVISIVE effect on the three friends, as all wanted to win.

56

Dogmatic

Asserting opinions in an arrogant manner, opinionated, arrogant.

Terry's DOGMATIC political speech turned some supporters against him.

57

Domestic

Of, or pertaining to, the home.

My DOMESTIC skills are lacking; I can't iron, cook, or sew.

58

Dominant

Having authority or influence, controlling.

Natalie has such a DOMINANT personality no one else gets a word in.

59

Dormant

Inactive, as if asleep, inert.

The DORMANT volcano hasn't erupted in more than a century.

60

Dubious

Doubtful, uncertain.

Rachel I'd DUBIOUS about the addition of a new judge to the singing contest.

61

Duplicity

Having deliberate untruth in speech or behavior, deceit.

Jack's DUPLICITY cost him both girlfriends when they found out about each other.