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1

Rudder Boost

Rudder boost assists in directional control when one engine fails

2

Annunciator panel

An annunciator panel, also known as 'Centralized Warning Panel' (CWP) is a group of lights used as a central indicator of status of equipment or systems in an aircraft.

An Annunciator "announces" system malfunctions or important alerts

3

Foot Pound

A foot-pound is the amount of work done by one pound of force exerted through a distance of one foot.

4

Foreign Object Damage

Foreign object damage is any damage attributed to a foreign object (i.e. any object that is not part of the vehicle) that can be expressed in physical or economic terms and may or may not degrade the product's required safety or performance characteristics. FOD is an acronym often used in aviation to describe both the damage done to aircraft by foreign objects, and the foreign objects themselves.

B200: When the compressor section starts to get dirty or is damaged by FOD, it has to spin faster to produce the same torque setting.

5

Inverter

An inverter is an electrical device that changes direct current (DC) to alternating current (AC). The converted AC can be at any required voltage and frequency with the use of appropriate transformers, switching, and control circuits.

Inverters are commonly used to supply AC power from DC sources such batteries.

6

Magneto

A magneto is an electrical generator that uses permanent magnets to produce alternating current.

7

Powerback

When reverse thrust is used to push an aircraft back from the gate, the maneuver is called a Powerback. Powerback is used by aircraft to reverse using the power of their engines.

8

Power

Power is the rate at which work is done. One HP is 550 foot-pounds of work per second or 33000 foot-pounds of work per minute.


Indicated Horse Power: the power an engine would develop if it worked without frictional losses

Brake/Shaft horsepower (SHP): Also called delivered horsepower, is the actual power output of an engine minus the frictional losses. The terms are used depending on what kind of instrument is used to measure it.

Thrust Horsepower: is a measure of the power of a jet or rocket engine. It is also a measure of the rotational power that an engine-driven propeller converts into thrust.

9

Thrust Reversers

Help an aircraft slow down just after touch-down, reducing brake wear and enabling shorter landing distances. They reverse the direction of the exhaust stream of the jet engine and use the power of the engine itself to decelerate. Since a direct reverse exhaust stream is not possible, a 45° angle is taken.
The amount of thrust and power generated are proportional to the speed, making reverse thrust more effective at high speeds. For maximum effectiveness, it should be applied quickly after touchdown. If activated at low speeds, foreign object damage is possible.

Advantages: Landing in snow or rain, in emergencies like rejected take-offs.

> Propeller-driven aircraft:
Generate reverse thrust by changing the angle of their controllable-pitch propellers so that the propellers direct their thrust forward.

> In Jet aircraft
Thrust reversal is accomplished by causing the jet blast to flow forward. 3 types of Jet TR's:
• Target
• Clam-shell
• Cold stream systems

Some aircraft, mostly propellor driven (non-commercial) can safely use reverse thrust in flight.
In-flight use of reverse thrust has several advantages.
• It allows for rapid deceleration, enabling quick changes of speed.
• It also prevents the speed build-up normally associated with steep dives, allowing for rapid loss of altitude

10

Thrust

Thrust is the forward force of propulsion.

11

Torque-limiter

A torque limiter is an automatic device that protects mechanical equipment, or its work, from damage by mechanical overload. Torque limiters protect the engines from injudicious applications of power .

The B200 has a torque limiter to reduce the gas generator speed (N1) by bleeding off Py air (this is very similar to P3 air which tells the fuel control that the engine is responding to fuel increase or decrease).

There are limits on how long an over torque condition is allowed, but special inspections and possibly overhaul of the engine is required if the engine is over torqued too long.

12

Torque

Righty tighty lefty loosey.

A twisting force. A measure of how much a force acting on an object causes that object to rotate. The force must always act away from an objects center of rotation for the force to be called torque.

Eg. Car engine produces torque to turn the wheels. Brakes produce torque that decelerate the wheels.

13

Volt

The force that makes electricity move through a wire or a circuit. It is the force of pressure on the electrons to move out of the source. It is measured in volts. Mathematically, the voltage is the amount of work needed to move a charge of 1 coulomb from one position to the other. Where V=Voltage, I=Current, R=Total resistance.

The voltage is the change in electric potential between two positions. Voltage is always measured between two points, for example between the positive and negative ends of a battery, or between a wire and ground.

Consider the analogy of a swimming pool where: Pool = circuit, Swimmer = electrons

Voltage is the force that pushes the swimmer (electrons) from their starting position to go to the other end of the pool (circuit).

There are two types of forces/voltage
• AC: pushes electrons in both directions - to the other side of the pool and back
• DC: force pushes electrons only in one direction - to the other end of the pool.

AC
stands for alternating current, which means the electrical current frequently reverses direction. AC electricity is measured according to its cycles, with one complete cycle being counted each time a given current travels in one direction and then doubles back on itself. Like it's doing laps in the most dangerous swimming pool ever. An electrical current is able to complete many cycles per second, and is then given its frequency rating based on that number. The unit of measurement for an electric cycle is “Hertz” (Hz), not to be confused with the Hertz Donut (Hz DnT), which is not nearly as delicious as it sounds. The typical frequency in North America is 60 hertz (Hz), which indicates that the current is performing 60 cycles per second. In Europe and many other countries, they usually stick to 50 hertz. AC power is the type of electricity most commonly used in homes and offices, and is extremely versatile because its voltage can be changed through a transformer to suit a variety of transmission needs.

14

Radar Altimeter

TBA

15

Yaw Damper

TBA

16

Generator

TBA

17

HF, UHF, VHF

TBA

18

ICS1, ICS2

TBA

19

Aft Blower

TBA

20

Bleed air valve

TBA

21

Auto-Ignition

TBA

22

VDC Generator system

TBA

23

Ampere

TBA

24

BUS, DC BUS, ISOLATION BUS

TBA

25

Firewall Shutoff valve

TBA

26

Current limiters

TBA

27

Diode

TBA

28

Circuit breaker

TBA

29

Nacelle

TBA

30

Pressure altitude

TBA