Dementia and Prion-related Diseases Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Dementia and Prion-related Diseases Deck (90)
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1

Every 4 years after the age of 65-69, SDAT prevalence increase by how much?

it doubles (starting at 2% for ages 65-69)

2

The populations of numerous countries has a higher percentage of people that are getting (blank) than past years

older

3

(blank) is a syndrome of acquired, persistent intellectual impairment that is due to brain dysfunction.

dementia

4

What kind of dementia is this:
conenital mental retadation, and developmental delay

acquired dementia

5

What kidn of dementia is this:
delirium

persistent dementia

6

What kind of dementia is this:
isolated deficiets (amnesia or aphasia)

multiple deficits dementia

7

Operationally, dementia implies impairment in (blank) or more of the following domains of mental capacity:
Memory Praxis Executive Functions
Language
Calculations
Personality
Perception
Semantic Knowledge
Emotional Expression
Awareness

three

8

How can you figure out if someone has dementia?

mental status assessment, clinical rating scales, neuropsychological testing

9

When do you get alzeheimers?

after 65

10

What is this:
slowly progressive decline in recent memory, language, visuospatial impairment, executive dysfunction

alzheimers

11

What is this:
fluctuating course
dementia followed by spontaneous parkinsonism
visual hallucinosis and/or psychosis
neuroleptic sensitivity

dementia with lewy bodies

12

What is this:
abrupt cognitive loss, stepwise decline
Infarcts and/or vascular disease by imaging
focal neurologic signs

vascular dementia

13

Dementia is abrupt or insiduous?

insiduous

14

Is delirium constant or fluctuating?

fluctuating

15

What is this:
onset BEFORE 65
prominent impairment of behavior, social conduct, judgement
early disturbance of lanuage, progressive aphasia

frontotemporal dementia

16

T/F
dementia is a global impairment of intellectual function

F

17

T/F
dementia always impairs memory?

F

18

T/F
dementia always impairs insight; patients aware of their deficits dont have dementia

F

19

T/F dementia is a cognitive disorder and never primarily a behavioral disorder

F

20

Dementia is synonymous with alzheimers disease
T/F

F

21

Dementia can have an acute onset

T

22

Can you treat dementia?

no, but you can treat the symptoms

23

Is this dementia or mild cognitive impairment:
memory loss
preserved cognition
preseved ADL
not demented

mild cognitive impairment

24

Is this dementia or not:
memory loss
at least 2 cognitive domains
diminished ADL

dementia

25

Is this delirium or dementia:
Onset is acute
duration is hours to days
course is fluctuating
arousal is lethargic to agitated
distracted
memory impaired by inattention
dysarthric, incoherent speech and language
frequent misperceptions
fearful
postural tremor
myoclonus or asterixis
EEG is slow

delirium

26

What is this:
most often insidious, last months to years, usually is constant, normal arousal and attnetion but abnormal amnesic memory, aphasia an dysnomic speech and language skills, mormal perception and fine motor skills until later in life and a normal EEG

dementia

27

What is this:
Learning is slower
Learned material is retained
Language, math, visual-spatial ability is preserved
Problem solving using shifting strategy is impaired, but experience aids

normal aging :)

28

(blanK) can distinguish the intellectual changes of dementia from those associated to delirium, isolated cognitive deficits, normal aging and other conditions
Identifies patterns and profiles of neurobehavioral dysfunction which suggest specific dementing diseases
Establishes and communicates severity of dementia and follow course of patients over time

mental status exam

29

Alzheimers is associated with what protein gone bad?

amyloids

30

What are the elements you test in mental status evaluation?

arousal and attention
language
memory
perception and construction
personality and emotion