Eating psychological explanations for a disorder Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Eating psychological explanations for a disorder Deck (14):
1

What did Becker find?

Eating disorders from 1995 to 1998 following the introduction of TV to Fiji increased. There was an increase in vomiting for weight control from 3% of girls to 15%.

2

What did Keel and Klump find? Why is it special?

Anorexia is not a culture bound disorder, though it is proportional to the degree of Western influence. It is cross-cultural.

3

What did Groesz find? Why is it special?

Body dissatisfaction was significantly increased after exposure to media images of thin women. It was a meta-analysis of 25 studies.

4

What did Button and Warren find in 2001?

Anorectics often reported feeling a lack of control over their lives.

5

What did Carter find in 2006?

Studying 77 female anorectics, he found 48% reported childhood sexual abuses.

6

What did Steiner observe in 1991?

Parents of adolescents tend to define their children's physical needs rather than allowing them to define their own.

7

What did Bruck find in 1973?

Many parents of anorectics claimed to anticipate their children's needs rather than ever letting them feel hungry.

8

Eating disorders from 1995 to 1998 following the introduction of TV to Fiji increased. There was an increase in vomiting for weight control from 3% of girls to 15%.

Becker.

9

Anorexia is not a culture bound disorder, though it is proportional to the degree of Western influence. It is cross-cultural.

Keel and Klump.

10

Body dissatisfaction was significantly increased after exposure to media images of thin women. It was a meta-analysis of 25 studies.

Groesz.

11

Anorectics often reported feeling a lack of control over their lives.

Button and Warren, 2001.

12

Studying 77 female anorectics, he found 48% reported childhood sexual abuses.

Carter, 2006.

13

Parents of adolescents tend to define their children's physical needs rather than allowing them to define their own.

Steiner, 1991.

14

Many parents of anorectics claimed to anticipate their children's needs rather than ever letting them feel hungry.

Bruch, 1973.