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Flashcards in energy and ATP Deck (20):
1

what is ATP?

a phosphorylated macromolecule that provides energy to drive many cellular processes.

2

what does ATP stand for?

Adenosine TriPhosphate

3

what are the components of the ATP nucleotide?

3 x phosphate
1 x ribose
1 x adenine

4

where is the energy in ATP released from?

the bonds between the phosphate groups

5

bonds between the phosphate groups are...

weak/unstable - have a low activation energy so easily broken - when they do break, they release a considerable amount of energy.

6

what is the function of the ribose in an ATP nucleotide?

acts as a backbone for other parts to attach to.

7

what is adenine?

a nitrogen containing organic base

8

ATP + Water --> ?

ATP + Water --> ADP + Pi + E

9

what does ADP, Pi + E stand for?

adenosine diphosphate + inorganic phosphate + energy

10

what type of reaction is ATP + Water --> ADP + Pi + E?

hydrolysis reaction - water is used to convert ATP to ADP

11

which phosphate is removed during the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP?

the terminal phosphate

12

which enzyme is required to catalyse the hydrolysis of ATP?

ATP Hydrolase (ATPase)

13

the hydrolysis of ATP to form ADP is a...

reversible reaction

14

why is the hydrolysis of ATP to form ADP a reversible reaction?

energy can be used to add an inorganic phosphate to ADP to reform ATP.

15

ADP + Pi + E --> ATP + Water is a...

condensation reaction

16

why enzyme is required to reform ATP?

ATP synthase

17

the hydrolysis of ATP...

provides energy for reactions that require it - energy released for use by cells.

18

the reformation of ATP via condensation reaction?

reactions that release energy e.g. energy supplied from respiration.

19

how is ATP resynthesised in cells?

1. from ADP and phosphate
2. using ATP synthase
3. during respiration

20

give 2 ways the hydrolysis of ATP is used in cells?

1. to provide energy for other reactions
2. to add a phosphate onto molecules - making them more reactive