Exam 2; Schizophrenia and the Anti-Psychotic Drugs Flashcards Preview

AU14 Pharmacology > Exam 2; Schizophrenia and the Anti-Psychotic Drugs > Flashcards

Flashcards in Exam 2; Schizophrenia and the Anti-Psychotic Drugs Deck (31):
1

What are the 7 symptoms of schizophrenia

delusions
hallucinations
disorders thinking
paranoia
inappropriate or bizarre behavior
violence
incontinence

2

What proportion of people in the hospital have schizophrenia

roughly 25% of all the beds at the hospital

3

What group of people is there a significant portion of those with schizophrenia

homeless people

4

What is the suicide rate of those with schizophrenia

greater than 10%

5

What are some supposed causes of schizophrenia

genetics
environmental (?)
there is evidence of excess activity of Da; link between schizophrenia and parkinson's

6

This was the first anti-psychotic drug used; it suppressed the complex but not reflex behaviors

chlorpromazine

7

What are three symptoms of chlorpromazine

loss of initiative
disinterest in the environment
decrease in emotion

8

What is it that all the anti-psychotic drugs work in part by

blocking the dopamine receptors in the brain

9

What is the timing of anti-psychotic beginning to work

may take several weeks for the full effect of the drugs to take place

10

True or False
Patients can become addictive and tolerant to anti-psychotic drugs

False; it is non addictive and patients do not become tolerant

11

What is the mechanism behind typical (first gen.) anti-psychotic drugs

have a strong affinity for DA receptors and some affinity for histamine 1 receptors

12

These are two typical high potency anti-psychotics

haloperidol
pimozide

13

What class of drugs are the typical low potency anti-psychotic

"-zine's"
triroidazine, etc.

14

What classes of drugs are the "atypical" anti-psychotic

"-done"
"-apine"
aripiprazole

15

What is the mechanism of atypical anti-psychotic drugs

strong affinity for dopamine, histamine-1, and SHT

16

What is the mechanism behind most anti-psychotic drugs

inhibit dopaminergic neurons

17

anti-psychotics act on the cortical receptors causing these three symptoms

decreased delusions
decreased agitation
impaired intellectual function

18

anti-psychotics act on the basal ganglia and cause what symptom

extrapyramidal symptoms

19

anti-psychotic drugs can act on the hypothalamus and cause what to occur

inhibit the secretion of some hormones like GH or corticotropin releasing factor
lower body temperature

20

anti-psychotic drugs can act on the chemoreceptor trigger zone to do what

decrease nausea

21

What is the therapeutic index of anti-psychotics

very high; virtually impossible to kill you

22

What are some major symptoms of anti-psychotics

Parkinson's like effects; bradykinesia, dystonias, akasthisia, tardive diskinesthia

23

How do anti-psychotics cause sedation

histamine1 blockade

24

How do anti-psychotics cause postural hypotension

due to alpha-1 blockage

25

What is the result of a hypersensitive reaction caused by anti-psychotics

rashes

26

How do anti-psychotics alter the visual system

anticholinergic effects
chlorpromazine causes deposition of metabolism in the eye and leads to irreversible lens pigmentation

27

How do anti-psychotics cause endocrine disturbances

increase in prolactin secretion

28

This is much like malignant hyperthermia

neuroleptic malignant syndrome

29

anti-psychotics can cause this; not feeling well when you take these agents

dysphoria

30

What type of drug interaction can occur with anti-psychotics

interacts with CNS depressants

31

What other symptoms are anti-psychotics used to treat

bipolar
hiccups
nausea
Tourettes
OCD
stuttering
migraines