Exam 4: Dr. Sullivant Immunological Techniques Flashcards Preview

Immunology - DVM year 1 > Exam 4: Dr. Sullivant Immunological Techniques > Flashcards

Flashcards in Exam 4: Dr. Sullivant Immunological Techniques Deck (28):
1

What are the different diagnostic tests?

Primary binding tests*
Secondary binding tests
Tertiary binding tests
Measuring antibody levels with titers*
Molecular diagnostics*

2

What are primary binding tests?

Directly detects antigen binding to antibody

3

In primary binding tests, one of the reactants (Ab or Ag) must be chemically labelled for detection. What are those labels?

Radioisotopes
Fluorescent dyes
Enzymes

4

What are examples of primary binding immunoassays?

Immunofluorescence assays (IFA)
Immunoenzymes assays

5

What are immunofluorescence assays?

Direct or indirect fluorescent antibody tests

6

What are immunoenzymes assays?

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA)
Western blot
Immunohistochemistry

7

What does the direct fluorescent antibody of IFAs do?

Detects specific Ag in patient sample

8

What does the indirect fluorescent antibody of IFAs do?

Detects patient antibody to specific Ag

9

What is bound antibody detected with in indirect fluorescent antibody of IFAs?

FITC-labeled antiglobulin

10

What makes an ELISA test enzyme-linked?

An enzyme is conjugated to an antibody

11

What happens to the enzyme in ELISA?

It changes color when mixed with a substrate

12

What can ELISA detect?

Patient antibodies or antigens

13

What does the SNAP test detect for heartworms?

Antigen

14

What does the SNAP test detect for FeLV?

Antigen
Detects circulating FeLV virus

15

What does the SNAP test detect for FIV?

Antibody
Positive with infection or vaccination

16

What does the SNAP test detect for parvo?

Antigen

17

What does the SNAP test detect for lyme, anaplasma, and ehrlichia?

Antibodies

18

What does the SNAP test detect for leptospirosis?

Antibodies

19

What is the clinical use of western blot?

Conformation of other test results
Rile out false positives (i.e. vaccination)

20

What is the importance of enzymes with immunohistochemistry?

They are used as the label
They are conjugated with Ab or antiglobulin to locate specific antigen in tissue

21

What is the clinal case of IHC?

Diagnosis of disease and determination of tissue type in tumors
Actin Ab used to determine if skeletal muscles is in origin

22

Describe radioimmunoassays

Expensive
Clinical use: detection of trace drugs

23

What is antibody titration?

Testing for the amount of circulating antibodies present in the serum to a given pathogen

24

What does a high titer mean?

High concentration of antibodies

25

What does serum neutralization do (secondary binding)?

Incubate different concentrations of serum with virus

26

What is titer of microscopic agglutination tests?

The highest dilution that causes agglutination of 50% of the organisms

27

What does a positive PCR mean?

Target DNA found in patient sample

28

What is immunophenotyping useful for?

Assessing leukocyte populations