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Flashcards in Fluent Aphasia Deck (22):
1

Describe the aphasia chart

A image thumb
2

Discuss Wernicke's aphasia. What is the sight of lesion? What is the blood supply?

•Site of Lesion: Damage to Wernicke’s area (Superior temporal gyrus)
•Blood supply: Posterior branch of Left Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA) 
 

3

Describe the features of Wernicke's aphasia. How is the auditory comprehension? How is the verbal expression? How is repetition?

Auditory Comprehension

  • Impaired comprehension

Verbal Expression

  • Fluent
  • Grammatical but lacking content (jargon)
  • Anomia
  • Neologisms
  • Circumlocution
  • Logorrhea

Impaired Repetition

4

Describe features that are associated with Wernicke's aphasia.

Other features:
•Generally preserved motor skills
•Poor self-monitoring
•Anosagnosia
•May co-occur with reading deficits
 

5

Describe press of speech and logorrhea. What do these co-occur with?


•Press of speech:  A need to speak immediately and rapidly

•Logorrhea: Constant verbal output

•Co-occurs with pragmatic difficulties, especially trouble turn-taking
 

6

Describe circumlocution. What is it the result of? What is it accompanied by?

•Literally: To go around
•Usually the result of anomia
•Using multiple words to describe an object or explain a concept
•Accompanied by Logorrhea in fluent aphasia
 

7

Describe neologisms. What are they a form of? What are they associated with? What is subtituted for a target?

•A form of Paraphasia
•Associated with Fluent aphasias
•A non-word is substituted for a target.

“Botsly”

“Foistrun”

“Printzeen”

8

Describe anosagnosia

Agnosia- to not know

Anosagnosia: To not know what you don’t know. Denial of deficits

With Wernicke’s Aphasia often refuse to accept that they have aphasia

Or think everyone else has the problem

9

Describe receptive language defecits. Mild? Moderate? Severe?


Mild:

  • May have difficulty with complex information, or large quantities of information presented quickly

Moderate Impairment:

  • May understand portions of information. May be able to process only one thing at a time. 

Severe impairment:

  • May laugh appropriately at jokes
  • May answer yes/no questions


 

10

Describe transcortical sesory aphasia. What is the site of lesion? What is the blood supply? What are the features? What is it similar to? What is preserved?

Site of Lesion:

  • Around the Temporo-parietal-occipital junction
  • Posterior to Broca’s area

Blood Supply: Either

  • Posterior Cerebral Artery or
  • Middle Cerebral Artery

Features:

  • Similar to Wernicke’s Aphasia
  • **Preserved repetition**
  • Fluent, empty output
  • Impaired comprehension
  • Anomia
  • Paraphasias


 

11

Describe conduction aphasia. What is the site of lesion? What is the blood supply? What are the features?

Site of Lesion:

  • Supramarginal gyrus of the parietal lobe
  • Arcuate fasciculus

Blood Supply:

  • Middle Cerebral Artery

Features:

  • Fluent
  • **Impaired repetition**
  • Intact comprehension
  • Anomia
  • Phonemic Paraphasias
  • Good awareness of deficits
     

12

Describe anomic aphasia? What is the site of lesion? What is the blood supply? What are the features?

Site of lesion:

  • Can be anywhere in the language centers

Blood Supply

  • Typically Middle Cerebral Artery

Features:

  • Intact comprehension
  • Fluent expression
  • Anomia is the Primary feature
     

13

Describe global aphasia. What is the site of lesion? What is the blood supply? What are the features?

Site of Lesion:

  • Zone of Language (Broca’s area, Wernicke’s area, arcuate fasiculus)

Blood Supply:

  • Primary branch of Middle Cerebral Artery

Features:

  • Severely impaired comprehension
  • Severely impaired expression
  • May co-occur with arousal, attention, cognition and significant motor deficits
  • Associated with Poor prognosis
  • Often co-occurs with dense hemiparesis
     

14

Describe mixed aphasia


•An aphasia that combines features of different aphasia syndromes
•The reality for most people with aphasia
 

15

What are the subcortical aphasias?


Striatocapsular (Basal Ganglia)

Thalamic
 

16

Describe thalamic aphasia. What is the site of lesion? What are the features? What may it co-occur with? Do people recover from it?

Site of Lesion: Thalamus
Features:

  • Almost fluent speech
  • Impaired auditory comprehension
  • Anomia in spontaneous speech, but relatively preserved object naming
  • Perseveration
  • Semantic Paraphasias
  • Good repetition
  • Intact grammar

May co-occur with dysarthria
Often recover rapidly

17

Describe striatocapsular aphasia. What is the site of lesion? What is the blood supply? What are the features?

Site of Lesion: Striatum (anterior portion of the Basal Ganglia)
Blood Supply: Lesion to BG reduces blood supply to cortical language centers.  May not be identifiable on neuroimaging
Features:
•Non-fluent
•Phonemic paraphasias
•Intact repetition
•Mild Anomia
 

18

What are the atypical aphasias?

Crossed

Primary Progressive

  • Progressive Nonfluent
  • Semantic dementia

19

Describe crossed aphasia

•Occurs when a lesion to the language-dominant hemisphere does not impair the dominant hand.
•Most commonly a Left handed person with a left hemisphere language center has a stroke in the left hemisphere
 

20

Describe primary progressive aphasia. What is it caused by? What is the first symptom? What can later stages include?

•Caused by degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes (usually left greater than right)
•Is generally inherited
•Aphasia is often the first symptom (unlike other dementias)
•Later stages often include cognitive deficits
 

21

Describe progressive non-fluent aphasia What is it caused by? What are the features?

Caused by degeneration of the frontal lobe
Features:
•Paraphasias
•Anomia
•Grammatical errors
•Simplified syntax

 

22

Describe semantic dementia. What is it caused by? What are the features?

Caused by degeneration of the temporal lobe
Features:
•Jargoning
•Logorrhea
•Difficulty with turn-taking
•Anomia