Funeral Service Merchandising- Interior Materials and Styles Flashcards Preview

Management- Mors 200 Study Guide > Funeral Service Merchandising- Interior Materials and Styles > Flashcards

Flashcards in Funeral Service Merchandising- Interior Materials and Styles Deck (49):
1

This is highly visible and subject to scrutiny. It is highly probable that, aside from financial concerns, a family's buying decision will be greatly influenced by this.

The Interior of the Casket

2

Depending on the specific style, this the the amount of textiles that may be used to complete the casket lining.

Anywhere from 12 to 15 Yards

3

  • Crepe
  • Velvet
  • Satin
  • Linen and linen weaves
  • Twill weaves
  • Muslin
  • Silk
  • Rayon
  • Metallic cloth
  • Taffeta

Most Commonly Employed Textiles

4

Made from the web of a silkworm, and is similar to satin in appearance. May be reproduced synthetically.

Silk

5

Made from celluose (cellulose is a fiber from the walls of cell plants).

Rayon

6

Any material which contains thin metal thread as part of the design.

Metallic Cloth

7

A crisp, shiney material with a smooth, plain texture.

Taffeta

8

A word derived from the Latin for "crisp." A thin, crinkled cloth of silk, rayon, cotton, or wool.

  • Most contemporary manufacturers use rayon or cotton/polyester blends
  • Very commonly used in lining material
  • Typically found in low-to mid-range caskets.

Crepe

9

A fabric of silk, cotton, and possibly rayon, with a nap.

  • Found mainly in mid-to upper-range caskets
  • Two main types historically- dull-pile and transparent.
  • Several manufacturers are using this made from rayon (appearance of dull-pile) and offers the advantage of being highly wrinkle resistant.

Velvet

10

A plush, downy, soft surface texture.

Nap

11

Fairly thick, has a dull of matte appearance, and is relatively expensive.

Dull-Pile Velvet

12

Light in weight, has a slight sheen, and is slightly transparent.

Transparent Velvet

13

Fabric woven to create a smooth, lustrous face and dull back, and can be made from silk, nylon, rayon, or polyester.

  • Common a few decades ago, quite rare today
  • Most often seen in caskets of lesser quality

Satin

14

A fabric made from flax; noted for its strength, coolness, and luster.

  • A crisp textile, and has a distinctive woven appearance.

Linen

15

An herb, a member of the Linaceae family. Its fibers and seeds are used in textile and food production, and the production of linseed oil and linoleum flooring.

  • Humans utilized this in the form of linen for over 7,000 years (Ancient Egyptians use of linen wrappings in the preparation of the dead).

Flax

16

Woven to look like linen and used as a casket lining material.

  • More common than genuine linen textile

Linen Weave

17

A textile weave in which threads are crossed over one another to give an appearance of diagonal lines in the finished product.

  • Can be made from a number of raw materials
  • Usually seen in lower-priced caskets

Twill Weave

18

A very basic, plain-woven cotton fabric.

  • Most frequently used in the lining of Orthodox Jewish casket or "aaron" and for making burial shrouds.

Muslin

19

The textiles used to line caskets relies heavily on these in order affect their intended style. Without them, the casket interior would lack from and definition. Frequently used materials:

  • Cardboard
  • Plastic
  • Masselin
  • Excelsior
  • Cotton
  • Kapok
  • Wool batting
  • Sisal (Hemp)
  • Other synthetic textiles

Backing and Padding Materials

20

Those which literally back the casket lining, giving it body and support, and include cardboard, masselin, and plastic.

Backing Materials

21

Cotton-like in appearance. This material is also used as the flotation device in life-belts. It is made from the fiber of the Ceiba tree which grows in the country of Malaysia.

Kapok

22

Thin pressed sheets of wool.

Wool Batting

23

Thin rope-like fiber, sometimes called "horse hair."

Sisal (Hemp)

24

Frequently used as backing materials helping to form the cove or roll and cap panels.

Cardboard and Thermofromed Plastics

25

Pressed paper in sheet form; it supports the lining materials, particularly in the areas of the hinge cover and body lining, and in some cases, helps conceal the transparency of some lower grade fabrics.

Masselin

26

Being used as a backing material more frequently today.

Polyester Batting

27

Include excelsior, cotton, polyethylene foam, and spun polyester. They are found in areas where the deceased or purchasing consumer is likely to touch: the bed, pillow, throw, and sometimes the extendover and puffing.

Padding Materials

28

Wood that has been shredded into spaghetti-like strings.

Excelsior (Wood Wool)

29

Commonly used as padding materials in lower-end caskets.

  • Cost effective and could be seen as advantageous in that they readily absorb stray fluids.
  • Low resiliency and lack of softness

Sherdded Paper and Excelsior (Wood Wool)

30

Very soft and has long been used as a padding material in caskets. Highly absorbent.

Cotton

31

Polyethylene (closed-cell) foram and spun polyester.

Synthetic Materials

32

Can be formed in sheets of varying thickness.

  • Very clean
  • Highly resilient
  • Easy to work with
  • Cost-effective
  • Resistant to a wide range of solvents

Polyethylene

33

Resembles cotton candy.

  • Very clean
  • Highly resilient
  • Easy to work with
  • Cost-effective
  • Resistant to a wide range of solvents

Spun Polyester

34

  • Shirred
  • Crushed
  • Tufted
  • Tailored
  • Semi-tailored

Interior Styles

35

A style in which the material is drawn or gathered in a parallel fashion in a multiple needle head sewing process.

  • Frequently found in low-to mid-range caskets

Shirred

36

Closely akin to the method used to obtain a crushed interior. This is a variation of the Shirred interior.

Heat Shirred

37

A form of casket interior created by placing the lining material on a metal form, weights added, the material steamed, and then attached to a suitable upholstery (backing) material.

Crushed Interior

38

Created by placing a padding material between a lining material and a backing material, with subsequent stiches taken forming small, raised puffs.

  • Usually applied to the better mid- and upper-range caskets.
  • Variations- Carriage and Buscuit

Tufted Interior

39

Tufting resembling a diamond-like pattern.

Carriage Tufting (Buggy Tufting)

40

Resembles rows of squares.

Biscuit Tufting

41

A tightly drawn form of casket interior style.

  • Difficult and somewhat costly to produce
  • Appears plain, simple and dignified
  • More expensive interior style

Tailored Interior

42

A combination of a tailored interior with one or more other styles of interior, for effect.

Semi-Tailored Interior

43

There exists no hard and fast rule regarding mixing and matching interior styles within the same unit.

  • Throws and Pilows can be reversible when they have a different style applied to each side.

Many Caskets Will Incorporate 2 or more Different Interior Styles

44

A removeable and interchangeable item designed to fit into the casket's cap panel; provides the opportunity for value-added personalization by allowing a family to replace the casket's stock cap panel with a panel incorporating a theme or motif that reflects the deceased's faith, occupation, or hobby.

  • Design can be produced and delivered to the funeral home within 48 hours.

Specialty Head Panel (Specialty Cap Panel)

45

  • Piping, fluting or pipe organ
  • Cathedral
  • Inset
  • Other miscellaneous materials

Ways that the Interior Head Panel May be Decorated

46

The panel material is made into a vertical, or horizontal, hollow, tube-like design. May also be arranged into a "sunray" design.

Piping (Fluting, Pipe Organ)

47

A design which has a layered effect, using several layers of material.

Cathedral

48

A picture is used in the head panel. The Last Supper is often used for this.

Inset

49

Fringe, Drapes, and satin or velvet rope.

Other Miscellaneous Material