ID_UW Flashcards Preview

Peds Shelf > ID_UW > Flashcards

Flashcards in ID_UW Deck (124)
Loading flashcards...
1

Most common causes of neonatal sepsis

GBS, E. Coli and Listeria (in that order)

2

Tx for neonatal sepsis

Ampilicillin + Gentamicin

3

Meningococcal meningitis most commonly affects kids what age

3 years to adolescence

4

What is the most common cause of sepsis in the sickle cell population

Srep pneumonia, H influenza type B distant second

5

Patients with functional asplenia are at risk for

Strep pneumo, H influenza, neisseria meningitdes, and salmonella

6

Sickle cell patients should receive what vaccines

All regular vaccines + 23 valent polysaccaride pneumococcal and menigococcal conjugate vaccines.

7

What propylaxis should sickle cell patients take

Penicillin till age 5

8

Inability to extend neck, dysphagia, fever, muffled voice and widened prevertebral space on lateral x0ray suggest?

Retropharyngeal abscess

9

Most common organism/cause of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in neonates?

E Coli and GBS

10

Most common organism/cause osteomyelitis in

GBS

11

Triad of infectious mono?

Exudative pharyngitis/tonsillitis, diffuse or posterior cervical lymphadenopathy, and fever

12

IM is most commonly caused by and in what age group?

Ebstein Barr virus, 15-24 year olds

13

When does a rash occur in IM?

Can occur in IM but most frequently after administration of amoxicillin or ampicillin

14

Precautions for people with IM?

Avoid contact sports for 3 weeks due to splenomegaly

15

3 stages of whooping cough (pertussis)

1) Catarrhal (1-2 weeks) 2) Paroxysmal (2-6 weeks) 3) Convalescent (Week to months)

16

What are the clinical sx a/w with the 3 stages of whooping cough

1) Catarrhal (1-2 weeks) - rhinits, mild cough 2) Paroxysmal (2-6 weeks) - post-tussive emesis, apnea/cyanosis in infants, coughing paroxysms with inspiratory whoop 3) Convalescent (Week to months) sx resolve gradually

17

Dx of pertussis

Bacterial culture and/or polymerase chain reaction from nasopharyngeal secretions in patients

18

What is the treatment for pertussis

Macrolides such as azithryomycin, erythromycin

19

Pertussis patients can develop marked (cbc finding)

Lymphocytosis

20

Pertussis prevent

Acellular pertussis vaccine

21

Pinworm infection aka

Enterobius vermicularis

22

complications of pertussis

Subconjunctival hemorrhages, pneumonia, weight loss, pneumothorax, respiratory failure, death (infants)

23

Treatment for enterobius vermicularis

Abendazole or pyrantel pamoate (latter preferred for pregs). Highly contagious. All household members should get treatment

24

Asymptomatic, immunocompetent and non-immune patients should get what if exposed to varicella?

within 3-5 days of exposure, get the varicella vaccine for post-exposure prophylaxis. Will work if given within 5 days of exposure

25

Asymptomatic, non-immune but immunocompromised/preggos should get what if infected with varicella?

Varicella IVIG. Does not prevent but will reduce disease severity but have to be be monitored closely becaues can extend incubation period to a month.

26

How long is incubation period of chicken pox and when is chicken pox contagious?

3 weeks but most sx surface in 2 weeks. Contagious 2 weeks before rash starts and till after all lesions are crusted over.

27

What are the most common causes of viral meningitis

Non-polio enteroviruses such as coxsackie virus or echovirus

28

incidence of viral meningitis decreases with?

Increasing age. Infants most affected with highest mortality and morbidity in this group.

29

What does CSF show with viral meningitis

Pleocytosis with lymphocytic predominance. Protein is normal to slightly elevated, glucose is normal. CSF gram stain will not show any organism.

30

Tx for viral meningitis?

this is usually a self limited leptomeningeal inflammation caused by a viral infection. Tx is usually supportive and sx resolve in 7-10 days.