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Flashcards in Immigration Deck (32):
1

What is the definition of emigrate?

To leave your country of origin to live permanently to another

2

What is the definition of immigrate?

To move permanently to a country other than one's native country

3

What are some examples of push factors?

War, absense of human rights, natural disasters

4

What are some examples of pull factors?

Job opportunities, lower taxes, freedom of speech and religion

5

What are some examples of intervening obstacles?

Great distances, expensive to travel, family separation

6

What are the 3 most popular cities for immigrants?

Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver

7

Why do people settle in urban places?

Jobs, easily accessible, variety of cultures, lots of buildings

8

Pros to having immigrants?

More workers, learn about other cultures, reputation as a generous country, more people to pay taxes, more skills, population grows to make more jobs

9

Investors must have _______ and ___/100 points before they can come to Canada

$1 600 000 and 37/100

10

What is multiculturalism?

A society that encourages interest in many cultures rather than in only one

11

Why does Canada NEED immigrants?

1. To keep apace for both economic and political reasons
2. To supply skilled workers to support boomers
3. The need for international prescense

12

What does Canada look for in immigrants?

Political and personal suitability, skilled in occupations needed by Canada, weather & ambitious, will add and contribute to Canadian society

13

What was the quickest way to get into Canada prior to 1989?

Say you were a "political refugee"

14

Why did the Canadian Government change their policy in 1989?

Canadians were upset and wanted to know who was coming in

15

What is a "true political refugee"

Someone who is in fear for their life and unable to return home

16

What are your chances of getting into Canada as an independent applicant?

1/10

17

What did the Royal Proclamation of 1763 say?

First Nations' land was to be respected, and if land was given up then there must be fair payment for it

18

What are treaties?

Agreements with the Europeans to maintain an economic base for Natives

19

When was the Indian Act and what did it do?

In 1876, created Status and Non-Status Indians

20

What is a comprehensive treaty?

Land treaty negotiated in place where no other treaty has ever been signed

21

What is a specific claim?

Government did not fulfill its end of bargain under treaty related to land, money

22

What are Inuits?

Natives living in Northern Canada

23

What are Metis?

Mixed Aboriginal and European, recognized in 1982

24

What are status Indians?

Aboriginals registered with the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs

25

What are non-status Indians?

Aboriginals who don't have official documents proving they are part of the first nations

26

What is the definition of assimilate?

To lose your culture and adapt the culture of the larger group in which you live

27

What are residential schools?

Schools where Aboriginal kids were taken from their parents and home to be assimilated

28

How is Canada an example of a "tossed salad"?

There are lots of different types of cultures making up one country

29

How is America an example of a "melting pot"?

There are a variety of cultures assimilated into one whole

30

Why do people migrate?

They seek a job, better quality of life, be closer to friends or family, religious freedom, escape political persecution, natural disasters

31

What did the First Nations originally want?

1. Land to fish, hunt, farm
2. Right to their own government

32

What does one need to do in order to immigrate as a skilled worker?

1. Apply (specializing in one of the 24 occupations)
2. Get at least 67/100 points in the point system
3. Person will see if you have what they need and if you do, you will come to Canada with the help from the Canadian government