Immune Mediated Injury Flashcards Preview

Pathology -- Gen Path > Immune Mediated Injury > Flashcards

Flashcards in Immune Mediated Injury Deck (35):
1

Acute phase includes...

Mast cell activation + de novo secretion of secondaries

2

Late phase is mediated by...

other activated inflammatory cells (eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes) recruited by the mast cell mediators

3

Lipoxygenase activity in the acute phase leads to production of...

LTB4
LTC/D/E
Prostaglandin E
PAF

4

Primary mediators released from Mast cells

Histamine
ECF-A
Acid hydrolases-Heparin/tryptase complex

5

Effects of Histamine, SRS-As?

Edema, Mucous Secretion
Bronchoconstriction

6

Effects of LTs, PAF, TNFa?

Continued edema, cell infiltrates

7

Continued presence of the eosinophils (characteristic of Type I rxn) relies upon

IL3,4,5, GMCSF

8

Systemic reactions seen in anaphylaxis

Tissue Swelling, Bronchoconstriction, Peripheral Vasodilation, Dizziness and Syncope, GI symptoms

9

Treatment for anaphylactic reaction?

Epinephrine

10

What is atopy?

The tendency to form IgE in response to specific antigens and the resulting allergic responses

11

Three main mechanisms of type II rxns

1. Ab dependent -- cell mediated destruction via Fc
2. Ab mediated -- complement fixation cell lysis
3. Ab mediated -- cellular dysfunction

12

Antibody type associated with Type II

IgM, IgG

13

Two examples of antibody mediated cellular dysfxn

myasthenia gravis
Grave's disease

14

Three clinical features of type II rxns

Antibody-mediated blood cell destruction
Antibodies to receptor antigens
antibodis to tissue antigens.

15

Examples of Type II diseases against tissue antigens

Goodpasture's disease
Hyperacute transplant rejection
Pemphigus vulgaris

16

How do you diagnose a type II disease?

Coomb's test, Ab in serum, immunoflouresence studies

17

Point of a direct and indirect Coombs

Direct -- Look for AB on cells
Indirect -- look for AB in serum

18

Three phases of a Type III hypersensitivity response?

1. Formation of Ab-antigen complexes
2. Deposition of complexes in specific tissues
3. Local tissue destruction medicated by complement

19

Preferred sites of deposition in type III hypersensitivity responses

Renal glomeruli
Joint synovium
Skin
Heart
Small BVs

20

Effect of Type III tissue damage on host tissues

Cell proliferation causing tissue thickening.
Epithelial proliferation in glomeruli causes proliferative nephropathy.

21

Hallmarks of Type III disease

Complement Consumption
Acute Inflammation with infiltration of Leukocytes
Deposition of Immune Complexes (seen by imm.fluor)

22

Three classic examples of Type III

Serum sickness
Post-infectious glomerulonephritis
Arthus rxn

23

What is the arthus rxn?

A localized area of reaction following injection of an antigen in an immunocompetent host

24

Differences between an Arthus test and a TB test?

Arthus -- AB mediated, occurs in hours
TB test -- Cell mediated, Required 1-2 days

25

Time course for a Type I, II, and IV rxn

I -- 10-20 minutes
II -- 4-12 hours
IV -- 48-72 hours

26

Tissue response in a Type I rxn

Wheal/Flare Rxn
No necrosis, no vesicle

27

Tissue response in Type III rxn

Acute inflamm w/ edema + pain
May become necrosis (w/ischemia)
NO vesicles

28

Tissue responses in type IV rxn

Skin induration and erythema
Vesicle formation in severe cases (due to cell mediated split of the epidermis)

29

Treatment for Type IV hypersens.

Minimal help from anti-histamine
Usually requires a steroid application

30

Classic examples of a Type IV rxn

Poison Ivy (Urshiol)
PPD test for TB
Chronic -- TB granuloma
Pannus formation in RA

31

a RIST skin test measures...

Serum amount of IgE

32

a RAST skin test measures...

serum amount of ANTIGEN SPECIFIC IgE

33

Which Ab is best at opsinization?
Best at complement activation?

Ops. -- IgG
Compl -- IgM

34

Granulomas propagate because macrophages give out _____ and lymphocytes give out ____

Macs give Il1 and 12
Lymp. give gamma interferon

35

T or F. Autoimmune diseases are associated with WBC count changes.

F