Inflammation Flashcards Preview

MCD Cell Pathology > Inflammation > Flashcards

Flashcards in Inflammation Deck (14):
1

Define Inflammation.

Reaction of living vascularised tissue to sub-lethal injury.

2

What are the three types of inflammation?

Acute
Chronic
Granulomatous

3

What are the five cardinal signs of inflammation?

Rubor (Red)
Dolor (Pain)
Calor (hot)
Tumor (swelling)
Functio Laesa (Loss of function)

4

What triggers histamine release? What do histamines do?

Binding of IgE to Mast cell Fc receptor, antigens bind and trigger degranulation from cross linking.

Histamines increase vascular permeability, vasodilate.

5

What is an exudate?

Protein high fluid and cell debris that deposits on tissues usually due to inflammation.

6

What is an transudate?

Fluid escape from vessels due to pressure disturbances.

7

What is the most important difference between exudates and transudates?

Exudates associated with inflammation.
Transudates not.

8

Give an example of resolution and how it occurs.

Pneumococcul Lobar Pneumonia -
- Exudate produced.
- Erythrocytes move into alveolar cells. (red hepatisation)
- Erythrocytes break down (grey hepatisation)
- If basement membrane intact body can remove problem.

9

What is repair? What are three complications of repair?

Repair - replacing normal tissue with scar tissue

Keloids - excess collagen deposition
Contractures - scar tissues contract, if over joint affects mobility.
Organ function - normal functional tissue replaced with scar.

10

What is the main histological feature of acute inflammation?

High neutrophil count

11

What are the three main cell types involved in chronic inflammation

Macrophages
Lymphocytes
Plasma Cells

12

What is an important difference between chronic and acute inflammation?

Acute produces exudate
Chronic doesn't

13

What are the histological features of granulomatous inflammation?

Clump of fused macrophages with lymphocytes and plasma cells at peripheries. (Granulomas)

14

What are the three types of exudate?

Serous - High fluid, low protein
Fibrinous - High fibrin
Purulent - Pus