Infratemporal Fossa, Maxillary Artery, Muscles of Mastication and V3 Flashcards Preview

Block 5 week 1 Dani > Infratemporal Fossa, Maxillary Artery, Muscles of Mastication and V3 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Infratemporal Fossa, Maxillary Artery, Muscles of Mastication and V3 Deck (130):
1

What is the only trigeminal division that carries both motor and sensory?

V3 mandibular branch

2

What are the CN that are general visceral efferents and parasympathetics? How do these travel to the head?

3,7,9,10 and they travel by jumping onto 5 to get to their target

3

What makes up the temporal region?

the temporal and infratemporal areas

4

Where do you find the infratemporal fossa?

deep to the mandible and inferior to zygomatic arch

5

What is the anterior boundary of the infratemporal fossa?
What is the medial boundary of the infratemporal fossa?
What is the lateral boundary of the infratemporal fossa?
What is the posterior boundary of the infratemporal fossa?

maxillary bone
lateral pterygoid plate
ramus
parts of temporal bone

6

What is the infratermporal fossa continuous with?

the temporal fossa

7

What is the inferior border of the infratemporal fossa?

there isnt one, it is actually open but the medial pterygoid muscle holds it in place

8

What do you call the point between the body and the ramus of the mandible?

the angle of the mandible

9

What the space between the mastoid process and styloid process? What passes through this?

the styloidmastoid foramen
CN 7

10

Once CN7 passes through the styloidmastoid foramen, what kind of fibers does it mainly carry? What does it give off here?

motor
5 terminal branches of facial expression (temporal, zygomatic, buccal, mandibular, cervical)

11

What is the fissure between the pterygoid plate and the maxilla? Why is this significant?

the pterygomaxillary fissure
this is how things get into and out of the Pterygopalatine fossa

12

What artery runs from the infratemporal fossa through the pterygomaxillary fissure and through the pterygopalantine fossa?

the terminal branch of the maxillary artery called the pterygopalatine portion or 3rd portion

13

So the foramen ovale and the foramen spinosum are wildly important, because one of the foramen has something neat coming out of the cranium and one has something neat going into the cranium....what are they?

coming out of the foramen ovale is the V3 (mandibular) nerve

going into the foramen spinosum is the middle meningeal artery

14

Once the mandibular nerve (v3) comes out of the foramen ovale, where does it go?

into the infratemporal fossa :)

15

What are the lateral and medial pterygoid plate a part of?

the sphenoid bone

16

where is the mandibular fossa?

underneath the zygomatic process where it meats the condylar process

17

What are four bony structures found on the mandible?

condylar process (articulation w/ temporal bone)
mandibular notch (below condylar process)
mandibular foramen (place for anesthesia)
coronoid process (crown next to mandibular foramen)

18

What is the TMJ?

temporomandibular joint

19

What do you find in the mandibular foramen and why is this significant?

you find the blood vessels and nerves to the mandible i.e. nerve supply to lower teeth (important for anesthesia)

20

How many joint cavities does the TMJ have and what are they?

2 cavities
superior joint cavity, a disc and inferior joint cavity

21

Explain the composition of the TMJ?

superior joint cavity, a disc, inferior joint cavity surrounded by strong ligamentous capsule. With a muscle that attaches from the condyle (of the mandible) to the disc.

22

What is the muscle called that connects the condyle (of mandible) to the disc of the TMJ?

the lateral pterygoid muscle (a muscle of mastication)

23

What does the lateral pterygoid muscle do?

it pulls both the condyle (of mandible) and the disc of the TMJ anteriorly

24

What happens when you open your jaw to your mandibular joint?

the mandibular condyle will move forward anteriorly on the mandibular fossa and then ride over the articular tubercle

25

What happens if you open your jaw too wide (i.e extreme protraction)?

you will move your condyle too far anteriorly and roll of the articular tubercle and thus into the space where your strong muscles of mastication are which will cause uniform contraction and prevent the return of the condyle to its previous location. To fix this you must use muscle relaxants and shove it back into place.

26

How do you open your jaw fully?

extreme protraction

27

Slight elevation and depression of your jaw happens as a (blank) movement.

hinge movements

28

How do you create grinding motions (side to side)?

elevation, depression, protraction and retraction

29

T or F
Can you protract on one side and retract on the other at the TMJ?

yes!

30

What are the 2 ligaments of TMJ that get taught as the jaw pulls forward and what do they do?

the sphenomandibular ligament
stylomandibular ligament

limit excess opening of the mandible

31

What is the main protractor of the mandible and how does it do this?

the lateral ptergyoid muscle It has two heads one pulls the condyle towards the ptergyoid plate and the other head yanks on the articular disc to open the jaw

32

So what do the two heads of the lateral ptergyoid muscle attach to?

One head-> condyle
second head-> articular disc

33

What connects the temporal bone to the mandible?

the joint capsule (fibrous CT)

34

Where do you find the synovial membrane within the joint capsule of the TMJ?

non-weight bearing surfaces

35

Where do you find hyaline cartilage in the TMJ?

articular surfaces

36

Betweeen the articular disc and the mandibular fossa (temporal bone) of the TMJ, what kinds of movements do you get here?

gliding movements

37

Between the articular disc and the hyaline cartilage of the condylar process of the TMJ, what kinds of movements do you get here?

hinge movements

38

Is the TMJ a stiff joint or does it have a large range of motion?
What does this mean?

large range of motion
very susceptible to dislocation

39

If you pass in anterior to the articular tubercle, what do you have?

jaw dislocation

40

What three general classifications of things do you find in the infratemporal fossa?

muscles of mastication
branches of mandibular nerve
branches of maxillary artery

41

What kinds of fibers do we need for muscles of mastication?

branchiomotor (SVE)

42

Describe the fibers found on CN V

it is a sensory nerve except for V3 which is also branchiomotor

43

Muscles of mastication all stem from (blank) and what gives motor innervation to them?

first branchial arch
CN 5 V3 (only division that carries motor in addition to sensory)

44

What is the most superifical muscle of mastication right underneath the skin?

masseter

45

What is a powerful elevator of the mandible (closes the jaw) and what plane is is the origin and insertion in? What does this mean about its movments?

the masseter
both in the same sagittal plane

its gonna kick ass at going up and down but sort of suck at going side to side.

46

What is the origin the masseter?
What is the insertion of the masseter?

zygomatic arch
ramus and angle of mandible

47

What do the anterior fibers of the temporalis muscle do?
How are the fibers oriented?

they contribute to elevation of the mandible and jaw closing
vertically oriented

48

What do the posterior fibers of the temporalis muscle do?
How are the fibers oriented?

contribute to retraction of the mandible and jaw closing
horizontally oriented (good at grinding)

49

The temporalis muscle and massater muscle are both innervated by what and do what?

V3 of CN5
they are muscles of mastication

50

which pterygoid muscle parallels the orientation of the masseter?

the medial pterygoid muscle

51

What is the muscle that has horizontal fibers and goes from the lateral border of the maxilla to the teeth? What kind of muscle is it? What innervates it?

buccinator
facial expression muscle
CN 7

52

What do you find going through the buccinator and where does it come from?

the parotid duct (entering right by the second upper molar) from the parotid gland :)

53

When it comes to protraction, what muscle is the big protractor?

lateral pterygoid

54

How many muscles does it take to do rotational (i.e grinding) movements?

at least 3 muscles alternating sides

55

Which of the following muscles elevate:
masseter, temporalis, lat pterygoid, med, pteryoid?

masseter, temporalis, med. pterygoid

56

Which of the following muscles depress:
masseter, temporalis, lat pterygoid, med, pteryoid?

lat. pterygoid

57

Which of the following muscles protract:
masseter, temporalis, lat pterygoid, med, pteryoid?

masseter, lat pterygoid, med pterygoid

58

Which of the following muscles retract:
masseter, temporalis, lat pterygoid, med, pteryoid?

temporalis

59

Which of the following muscles rotate:
masseter, temporalis, lat pterygoid, med. pterygoid?

temporalis, lat pterygoid, med. pterygoid

60

What do you find coursing between the bellies of the pterygoid muscles?

inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve

61

What are the four branches of the maxillary artery?

middle meningeal
inferior alveolar
muscular branches
sphenopalatine
(I Must Seduce Max)

62

What are the 6 branches of the 3rd trigeminal nerve (mandibular) that comes out of the foramen ovale and enter the infratemporal fossa?

buccal nerve (sensory)
lingual nerve
auriculotemporal nerve
inferior alveolar nerve
mylohyoid nerve
motor branches to muscles of mastication
BLAIM Me

63

What does the maxillary artery come off of? What comes of the maxillary artery and enters the foramen spinosum?

the external carotid
middle meningeal artery

64

What nerve pops out of the foramen ovale and splits around the middle menningeal artery?

auriculotemporal nerve

65

The external carotid comes up and ends in two terminal branches, what are they?

superficial temporal and the maxillary artery (goes deep into the infratemporal fossa)

66

What artery passes into the pterygomaxillary fissure?

the maxillary artery

67

What 2 branches of the maxillary artery travel underneath the temporalis muscle?

anterior and posterior deep temporal arteries (muscular branches)

68

What branch of the maxillary artery travels down and innervates the teeth of the mandible?

inferior alveolar artery

69

What branch of the maxillary artery enters the foramen spinosum?

middle meningeal artery

70

so once the maxillary artery enters the pterygopalantine fissure it no longer is in the infratemporal fossa but has now entered the (blank)

pterygomaxillary fossa

71

What does the middle meningeal make between the dura and the inside of the calveria (skull)?

depressions/grooves

72

What artery supplies the dura and can be easily torn following head trauma to the region of the temporal bone?

middle meningeal artery (cuz skull is softer in this area and more susceptible to fracture)

73

Motor innervation is from the buccal branch of the (blank). Sensory innervation is supplied by the buccal branch (one of the muscular branches) of the (blank).

facial nerve (cranial nerve VII)

mandibular part of the trigeminal (cranial nerve V)

74

What stuff within or near the infratemporal fossa needs somatosensory innervation? What gives this?

teeth
tongue
general sense
oral cavity
skin anterior to ear
CN 5

75

What is the ganglion of the trigeminal nerve?

trigeminal ganglion

76

Distal to the trigeminal ganglion, where does V3 go? What about V2 and V1?

goes through foramen ovale
goes through cavernous sinus

77

What are the little tiny branches that come off of CN 5 V3 before it makes its main divisioN?

MMTT
meningeal
medial pterygoid (motor branch)
tensor veli palatini
tensor tympani

78

What two division does CN5 V3 turn into?

the posterior and anterior division

79

What are the branches of the anterior division of CN 5 V3?

BLMAP (mostly motor with one sensory)
buccal (sensory branch)
lateral pterygoid
masseter
anterior and
posterior deep temporals

80

What are the branches of the posterior division of CN 5 V3?

ALI (mostly sensory with one motor)
Auriculotemporal
Lingual
Inferior alveolar

81

What is the mylohyoid branch?

it comes off the inferior alveolar and is motor

82

Where does the mental nerve come from?

it is a continuation of the inferior alveolar nerve

83

do the motor fibers and sensory fibers of CN 5 have the same nucleus?

no

84

What sensory innervation is coming back on CN 5?

general sense for discriminative touch, pain, proprioceptions, temperature

85

What nucleus will discriminitve touch go to?
What nucleus will proprioception go to?
Where will pain and temp go? Then where do all these fibers go?

chief sensory
mesencephalic
spinal 5
to the brainstem then to the pons

86

If a CN 5 fiber needs to go to spinal 5 nucleus which way from the trigeminal nucleus will it go?

down

87

What is weird about the proprioceptive fibers of of the trigeminal nerve?

they dont enter chief sensory, instead its ganglion is in the mesencephalic nucleus. (reflexes)

88

Which branch of the trigeminal nerve is the only branch with motor fibers?

the mandibular (V3)

89

2 pt disc, vibrational sense etc. synpases in what nucleus?

chief sensory nucleus

90

All components of the trigeminal nerve have their ganglion in the trigeminal ganglion except for which fibers?

fibers conveying proprioception (instead their ganglion is in mesencephalic)

91

The corneal reflex is the involuntary blinking of the eyelids – stimulated by tactile, thermal or painful stimulation of the cornea.

In the corneal reflex, the (blank) nerve acts as the afferent limb – detecting the stimuli. The facial nerve is the efferent limb, causing contration of the the orbicularis oculi muscle.

If the corneal reflex is absent, it is a sign of damage to which nerves?

opthalmic (5 V1)

either opthalmic (5 V1) or fascial nerve

92

Pain and temp from face, head and ant. 2/3 of tongue which have info from all three divisions of the trigeminal nerve but synapse at what nucleus?

descend down the spinal tract of 5 to the spinal nucleus of V

93

Does the chief sensory nucleus take info on pain?

Noooo

94

If you have a trigeminal division with branchiomotor and general sense, then what division is it?

mandibular division (v3)

95

All the glands of the head are innervated by (blank) except for the parotid gland. What CN innervates the parotid gland?

CN 7
CN 9

96

How do we get parasympathetics for the parotid coming in on 9 and the fibers of 7 to all the other glands?

by jumping on CN 5

97

Parasympathetics to the head leave the brainstem with cranial nerves (blank X 4). And how do these get to the head? What kind of nucleus will each of these nerves have?

III, VII, IX, X
****X not for the head*****
Hitchhike on CN V

general visceral efferent

98

Where is CN 3 located? CN7? CN 9?

midbrain
pons
medulla

99

What is attached to the lingual nerve and submandibular gland?
Why do you need this?

the submandibular ganglion
because it is parasympathetic and need to synapse close to their target :)

100

What kind of fibers does the lingual nerve carry?

somatosensory

101

What is the chordi tympani?
Where will it go?

it is a branch off of 7 inside the middle ear cavity that carries SVA for taste. It exits the petrotympanic fissure ad then jumps on the back of the lingual nerve synapses in submandibular ganglion and gives fibers to sublingual and submandibular gland

102

So if we really think about it, where does taste come from?

form the chordi tympani which will hit up the lingual nerve for a ride to the tongue

103

Where does the chorda tympani come from?

CN VII

104

the lingual nerve carries preganglionics from the chorda tympanni and post ganglionics after the (blank)

submandibular gland

105

Does the chorda tympani come off of CN 7 before or after the stylomastoid foramen? What is its position relative to the malleus and incus?

before
over the malleus under the incus

106

Where does cranial nerve 7 enter the brainstem?
at the point of entry there is a nucleus for branchiomotor (motor VII) and visceromotor (salivation) , but there is no nucleus for (blank).

pons
taste

107

Where do taste fibers and visceral afferent info go from CN 10, 9 ,7?

down to the medulla in the nucleus solitarius

108

What do you need parasympathetics to the head for?

for glands (they are secretormotor) and for pupillary constriction

109

What does chief sensory turn into as it goes down?
What does chief sensory turn into as it goes up?

spinal 5
mesencephalic

110

Bells palsy is an upper motor neuron problem or lower?

lower

111

Orbicularis oculi muscle is innervated by (balnk) (i.e the muscle that closes the eye). However the muscle that opens the eye is innervated by (blank).

CN 7
CN 3

112

There is collateral flow between the external and internal carotid in the face. T or F?

T

113

What nerve arches over the top of the tympanic membrane and heads to the tongue?

chordi tympani

114

(blank) is a canal in the petrous part of the temporal bone of the skull that carries nerves from inside the skull towards the middle and inner ear, namely cranial nerve VII and cranial nerve VIII.

internal auditory meatus

115

What goes through the pterygoid canal?

greater petrosal nerve and deep petrosal nerve carrying sympathetics

116

What fibers off of CN 7 go through the pertrotympanic fissure?

chorda tympani

117

How do you get the preganglionic parasympathetics into the parotid gland?

via the lesser petrosal nerve

118

The parotid gland is innervated by preganglionic parasympathetics from CN (blank) to the otic ganglion.

9

119

Describe the path of the lesser petrosal nerve

it is a tiny branch off CN 9 that exits the foramen ovale along side the mandibular division of CN 5, that synapses at the otic ganglion.

120

What fibers are on the lesser petrosal nerve?

only preganglionic parasympathetics

121

where does the petrosal nerve synapse and what happens after this point?

synapses in the otic ganglion, gives off fibers that jump on the auriculotemporal nerve and travel around the middle meningeal artery to innervate the parotid gland

122

What kind of fibers does the auriculotemporal nerve carry?

primarily sensory (to skin of ear, parotid gland, fasci) but it also carries postganglionic fibers that are secretomotor to the parotid gland

123

What is the nucleus for the lesser petrosal nerve?

the inferior salivatory nucleus of CN 9

124

What CN does the superior salivatory nucleus supply?

CN 7

125

What do salivatory nucleus (secretomotor nucleus) sit next?

motor nuclei

126

A tiny little nucleus called the inferior salivatory sits next to the (blank) column in the medulla and sends preganglionic axons out with cranial nerve IX. These ultimately synapse in a parasympathetic ganglion and reach the parotid gland. Very similar to the superior slaivatory nucleus associated with VII.

branchiomotor

127

So we have preganglionic fibers from the inferior salivatory nucleus, where do they go from here?
What other CN nerves exit here?

they exit the skull through the jugular foramen, CN 9 gives off tympanic nerve which goes through the tympanic canaliculus into the middle ear cavity and through the tympanic plexus to enter the petrosal hiatus to rreenter the skull to become the lesser petrosal nerve (on top of petrous portion of temporal bone) and the heads out the foramen ovale jumps into the otic ganglion and supplies the parotid gland.

Cn 9,10, 11

128

What is one of the main roles of CN 9?

to provide sensory to the middle ear cavity

129

What supplies the skin on the lateral side of the face just anteior to the ear and wraps around the middle meningeal artery and hooks around the mandible?

the auriculotemporal nerve

130

Where does the auriculotemporal nerve come from?

posterior division of V3