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Flashcards in Jung's Analytic Psychology Deck (83):
1

Jung's theory of personality

Analytical Psychology

2

To Jung, a broader and more generalized form of psychic energy

Libido

3

Jung's term for personality

Psyche

4

Jung's idea that conflict between opposing processes or tendencies is necessary to generate psychic energy

Opposition Principle

5

The continuing redistribution of energy within a personality; if the energy expended on certain conditions or activities weakens or disappears, that energy is transferred elsewhere in the personality

Equivalence Principle

6

A tendency toward balance or equilibrium within the personality; the ideal is an equal distribution of psychic energy over all structures of the personality

Entropy Principle

7

To Jung, the conscious aspect of personality

Ego

8

An attitude of the psyche characterized by an orientation toward the external world and other people

Extraversion

9

An attitude of the psyche characterized by an orientation toward one's own thoughts and feelings

Introversion

10

Refer to different and opposing ways of perceiving or apprehending both the external real world and our subjective inner world

Psychological Functions
(namely Sensing, Intuiting, Thinking and Feeling)

11

To Jung, eight personality types based on interactions of the attitudes (introversion and extraversion) and the functions (thinking, feeling, sensing and intuiting)

Psychological Types

12

Individuals with this personality type are logical, objective and dogmatic; they live strictly in accordance with society's rules, tend to repress feelings and emotions, to be objective in all aspects of life and to be dogmatic in thoughts and opinions, they may be perceived as rigid and cold, their focus is on learning about the external world and using logical rules to describe and understand it

Extraverted Thinking

13

Individuals with this personality type are emotional, sensitive, sociable; more typical of women than men

Extraverted Feeling

14

Individuals with this personality type are outgoing, pleasure-seeking and adaptable to different kinds of people and changing situations

Extraverted Sensing

15

Individuals with this personality type are creative, able to motivate others and to seize opportunities; tend to find success in business and politics; attracted to new ideas, able to inspire others to accomplish and achieve; tend to be changeable, moving from one idea or venture to another

Extraverted Intuiting

16

Individuals with this personality type are more interested in ideas than in people; do not get along well with others and have difficulty communicating ideas; intensely concerned with privacy and prefer to deal with abstractions and theories

Introverted Thinking

17

Individuals with this personality type are reserved, undemonstrative, yet capable of deep emotion; seem mysterious and inaccessible and tend to be quiet, modest and childish; have little consideration for others' feelings and thoughts and appear withdrawn, cold and self-assured

Introverted Feeling

18

Individuals with this personality type are passive, calm, outwardly detached, expressing themselves in aesthetic pursuits

Introverted Sensing

19

Individuals with this personality type are concerned with the unconscious more than everyday reality; tend to be visionaries and daydreamers; considered odd and eccentric, have difficulty coping with everyday life and planning for the future

Introverted Intuiting

20

The reservoir of material that was once conscious but has been forgotten or suppressed

Personal Unconscious

21

To Jung, a core or pattern of emotions, memories, perceptions and wishes in the personal unconscious organized around a common theme, such as power or status

Complex

22

The deepest level of the psyche containing the accumulation of inherited experiences of human and pre-human species

Collective Unconscious

23

Images of universal experiences contained in the collective unconscious

Archetypes
(synonymous to primordial images)

24

The public face or role a person presents to others

Persona Archetype

25

Feminine aspects of the male psyche

Anima Archetype

26

Masculine aspects of the female psyche

Animus Archetype

27

The dark side of the personality; the archetype that contains primitive animal instincts

Shadow Archetype

28

To Jung, the archetype that represents the unity, integration and harmony of the total personality

Self Archetype

29

To Jung, the ego begins to develop in __, at first in a primitive way.

Early childhood

30

It is not until __ that the psyche assumes a definite form and content. It is this period that Jung called our psychic birth.

Puberty

31

Jung believed that major personality changes occur in __.

Middle age (between the ages of 35 and 40)

32

A condition of psychological health resulting from the integration of all conscious and unconscious facets of the personality

Individuation

33

An innate tendency toward unity or wholeness in the personality, uniting all the opposing aspects within the psyche; the next developmental stage once psyche is individuated

Transcendence

34

A projective technique in which a person responds to a stimulus word with whatever word comes to mind

Word Association Test

35

Similar to catharsis, this technique focuses on the symptoms reported by the patient and attempts to interpret the patient's free associations to those symptoms

Symptom Analysis

36

A technique involving the interpretation of dreams to uncover unconscious conflicts

Dream Analysis

37

To Jung, dreams are __, that is they help us prepare for experiences and events we anticipate will occur; and dreams are __, they help bring about a balance between opposites in the psyche.

Prospective; Compensatory

38

An assessment test based on Jung's psychological types and the attitudes of introversion and extraversion

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)
It is considered the most visible practical outgrowth of Jung's work on the human personality.

39

Who developed the MBTI and when?

Katharine Briggs and Isabel Myers; 1920s

40

Jung's type of case study that involves examining a person's past experiences to identify developmental patterns that may explain present neuroses

Life-History Reconstruction

41

To Jung, not only is the __ the source of evil, it is also the source of vitality, spontaneity, creativity and emotion.

Shadow

42

Major archetypes according to Jung

Persona
Anima and Animus
Shadow
Self

43

The anima and animus archetypes refer to Jung's recognition that humans are essentially __.

Bisexual

44

To Jung, the __ cannot begin to emerge until the other systems of the psyche have developed. This occurs around __, a crucial period of transition in Jung's system.

Self; Middle Age
(Individuation can occur only in middle age)

45

An assessment instrument deriving from Jung's approach and is a highly popular employee selection technique

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

46

Identify widely-accepted Jungian ideas

Word Association Test
Complexes
Introversion-Extraversion
Self-Actualization
Midlife Crisis

47

Theory of personality which rests on the assumption that occult phenomena can and do influence the lives of everyone

Carl Jung's Analytical Psychology

48

Jung saw __ as the center of consciousness but not the core of personality; __ is the center of personality that is largely unconscious

Ego; Self

49

The __ embraces all repressed, forgotten or subliminally perceived experiences of one particular individual; its contents are called __ which are emotionally toned conglomeration of associated ideas.

Personal Unconscious; Complexes

50

The __ has roots in the ancestral past of the entire species; its contents are __ or ancient or archaic images

Collective Unconscious; Archetypes

51

Dreams associated with the collective unconscious with meaning beyond the individual dreamer and filled with significance for people of every time and place

Big Dreams

52

To Jung, unconscious physical impulse toward action

Instinct
(its psychic counterpart is the archetype)

53

Identify several modes where an archetype can express itself

Dreams (main source)
Fantasies
Delusions

54

To Jung, the side of personality that people show to the world

Persona

55

To Jung, the archetype of darkness and repression; consists of morally objectionable tendencies as well as constructive and creative qualities; knowing this is a person's first test of courage

Shadow

56

The feminine side of men is __ and the masculine side of women is __; becoming well acquainted with these is a person's second test of courage, a task requiring great courage and even more difficult than becoming acquainted with shadow

Anima (responsible for irrational moods and feelings);
Animus (symbolic of thinking and reasoning)

57

Archetype that represents two opposing forces - fertility and nourishment on the one hand and power and destruction on the other

Great Mother

58

Archetype of wisdom and meaning

Wise Old Man

59

Archetype usually represented in mythology and legends as a powerful person, sometimes part god, who fights against great odds to conquer or vanquish evil with a fatal flaw; serves our model for the ideal personality

Hero

60

The archetype of archetypes; innate disposition to move toward growth, perfection and completion

Self
(pulls together the other archetypes and unites them in the process of self-realization)

61

Ultimate symbol of the self; symbolizes a person's ideas of perfection, completion and wholeness; represents the strivings of the collective unconscious for unity, balance and wholeness

Mandala

62

According to Jung, what are the steps that people have to take to actualize or fully experience the self

1. Overcome fear of the unconscious
2. Prevent persona from dominating personality
3. Recognize the dark side of themselves (shadow)
4. Muster even greater courage to face their anima or animus

63

To Jung, adaptation to the outside world involving the forward flow of psychic energy is called __ whereas adaptation to the inner world which relies on a backward flow of psychic energy is called __

Progression; Regression

64

To Jung, a predisposition to act or react in a characteristic direction

Attitude
(Can be introverted and extraverted)

65

To Jung, a function characterized by logical intellectual activities that produces a chain of ideas

Thinking

66

Compare and contrast extraverted vs. introverted thinking

Extraverted thinking: people rely heavily on concrete thoughts but may use abstract ideas if they have been transmitted from without; objective in their approach (ex. mathematicians, engineers, accountants)
Introverted thinking: people react to external stimuli but interpretation is influenced by internal meaning (ex. inventors, philosophers)

67

To Jung, a function characterized by the process of evaluating an idea of event; evaluation of every conscious activity

Feeling

68

Compare and contrast extraverted vs. introverted feeling

Extraverted feeling: people use objective data to make evaluations; guided by external values and widely accepted standards of judgment (businessmen, politicians, real estate appraisers, objective movie critics)
Introverted feeling: people base value judgments primarily on subjective perceptions; ignore traditional opinions and beliefs (subjective movie critics, art appraisers)

69

To Jung, a function characterized by receiving physical stimuli and trasmitting them to perceptual consciousness; individual's perception of sensory impulses

Sensing

70

Compare and contrast extraverted vs. introverted sensing

Extraverted sensing: people perceive external stimuli objectively, in the same way these stimuli exist in reality (proofreader, house painter, popular musicians, wine taster)
Introverted sensing: people are largely influenced by subjective sensory sensations; guided by interpretation of sense stimuli rather than the stimuli themselves (portrait artists, classical musicians)

71

To Jung, a function that involves perception beyond the workings of consciousness; more creative, often adding or subtracting elements from conscious sensation

Intuiting

72

Intuiting

Extraverted intuiting: people are oriented toward facts in the external world; perceive them subliminally; guided by hunches and guesses contrary to sensory data (some inventors, religious reformers)
Introverted intuiting: people are guided by unconscious perception of facts that are basically subjective; subjective intuitive perceptions are remarkably strong and capable of motivating decisions of monumental magnitude (mystics, prophets, surrealistic artists, religious fanatics)

73

Stages of development according to Jung

Childhood (anarchic phase, monarchic, dualistic)
Youth
Middle Age
Old Age

74

A desire to live in the past, commonly experienced in youth stage and later stages

Conservative Principle

75

According to Jung, __ is the goal of life and that life can be fulfilling only when seen in this light.

Death

76

Jung's another term for psychological rebirth, which is the process of becoming an individual or whole person; process of integrating the opposite poles into a single homogenous individual

Self-Realization / Individuation

77

Identify Jung's primary methods of investigation

Word Association Test
Dream Analysis
Active Imagination
Psychotherapy

78

Identify the kinds of dreams which offered proof for the existence of the collective unconscious according to Jung

Big Dreams (have special meaning for all people)
Typical Dreams (common to most people)
Earliest dreams remembered (contain mythological and symbolic images and motifs, can be traced back to age 3 or 4)

79

Jung's method which requires a person to begin with any impression (image, vision, picture or fantasy) and to concentrate until the impression begins to "move"; a useful technique to become better acquainted with one's collective and personal unconscious

Active Imagination

80

Identify Jung's alternatives or variations to active imagination

Draw, paint or express in some other nonverbal manner the progression of one's fantasies

81

Identify Jung's 4 basic approaches to therapy

1. Confession of a pathogenic secret (use of catharsis)
2. Interpretation, explanation and elucidation (gives patient insight into the cause of neuroses)
3. Education of patients as social beings (enable patient to solve social problems and become socially well adjusted)
4. Transformation (therapist must first be transformed into a healthy human being to be able to help patients move toward individuation)

82

TRUE OR FALSE: Jung was quite eclectic in his theory and practice of psychotherapy. His treatment varied according to the age, state of development and particular problem of the patient.

TRUE

83

A term used to describe a therapist's feelings toward the patient

Countertransference