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Flashcards in Lesson 1 Deck (90)
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61

The Temporal Version of If

When

62

The Spacial Version of If

Where

63

The Only If Formula

- The part of the statement that is introduced by only if constitutes the necessary condition. The other part of the statement constitutes the sufficient condition.

64

You can access the network only if you a valid password

AN -----> VP

65

Only if you are physically fit can you become a firefighter

BF ----> PF

66

Temporal Version of Only If

Only When

67

The Spatial Version of Only If

Only Where

68

The phrase the only always introduces a ________________

sufficient condition

69

The All Formula

- The part of the statement that is introduced by all constitutes the sufficient, the other part of the statement constitutes the necessary condition. The All Formula always applies to statements that begin with all.

70

All Vertebrates have Backbones

V ----> B

71

Functional equivalents to All

Each, Every, Any

72

The No Formula

- The part of the statement that is introduced by no constitutes the sufficient. The negation of the other part of the statement constitutes the necessary condition. The No Formula always applies to statements that begin with no.

73

No Reptiles are warm-blooded

R ----> WB (not)

74

No reptiles are warm-blooded means the same thing as _________

All reptiles are not warm-blooded

75

Functionally equivalent of No

none

76

The Unless formula

- The part of the statement that is introduced by unless constitutes the necessary. The negation of the other part of the statement constitutes the sufficient condition.

77

The boat will Sink unless we repair the Hull

BS (not) ----> RH

78

Unless the players work together, the team cannot win the competition

PWT -----> WC

79

The Not Both Formula

One of the variables (it does not mater which one) constitutes the sufficient condition. The negation of the other variable constitutes the necessary condition

80

Julian cannot be in both London and Paris at the same time

P ----> L (not)

81

The expression "not both" implies that at least one of two given variables must be ABSENT

1) Julian is in London and Paris (Impossible)
2) Julian is in London but not in Paris (Impossible)
3) Julian is not in London but in Paris (Impossible)
4) Julian is in neither London nor Paris (Impossible)

82

The Either/Or Formula

The negation of one of the variables (it does not matter which one) constitutes the sufficient condition. The other variable consitutes the necessary consition

83

Either Burgess or Ellis will join the chess club


B (not) ----> E

84

The Expression "either... or" implies that at least one of two given variables must be present

1) Both Burgess and Ellis join the chess club (Possible)
2) Burgess joins the chess club but Ellis does not (Possible)
3) Burgess does not joib the chess club but Ellis does (Possible)
4) Neither Burgess nor Ellis joins the chess club (Possible)

85

A is taller than B and shorter than C

C > A > B

86

If A > B and B > C, then

A > B > C

87

If C > D and D > E, then

C > D > E

88

If A > B >C and if C > D > E, then

A > B > C > D > E

89

If A > B and C > B, then

A
> B
C

90

If A > B and A > C, then

B
A >
C