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Flashcards in Listening Strategies Deck (5)
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1

Main Idea

What does the lecture mainly discuss? / What is the main topic of the lecture?
1) Search your notes from the beginning. Identify the first topic brought up and determine if it was focused on throughout the notes that you have.
2a) If that topic is the major focus throughout your notes, then you have the focus of the listening and the main idea.
2b) If that topic is not the major focus throughout your notes, then you have to continue to scan your notes for a topic that is.
3) Examine your answer choices and choose an answer that fits what you have determined to be the main idea.

Type 1: Direct from the beginning.
Type 2: Change from the beginning (end of intro)
Type 3: Confusing (recurring word)

2

Detail

WH questions - What is the major source of meteoric water? / What are the two reasons the woman doesn’t feel safe?
1) Read the question to understand what information you are being asked to find.
2) Identify the key words in the question to search for in your notes.
3) Start searching your notes for the key words or synonyms of them.
4) When you find the key words, remind yourself of the question and scan your notes thinking carefully of what you heard and determine an idea of the answer in your mind. This is tough but crucial: you need to phrase a rough answer in your head before you look at the answer choices.
5) Once you have thought up what you think is a good, rough answer, check the answer choices and choose the one that matches your anticipated answer best.
Wrong answers often contain words you heard!

3

Inference

infer/imply/suggest: What does the officer imply when he says this: / What does the professor imply about the importance of surface tension in water?
1) Read the question to understand what information you are being asked to find.
2) Identify the key words in the question to search for in your notes.
3) Start searching your notes in search of the key words or synonyms of them.
4) When you find the key word, remind yourself of the question and read carefully to find the answer for yourself. Again, make sure that you phrase a possible answer or two in your head before jumping to the next step and looking through the answer choices.
5) Once you have identified a rough answer on your own, check the answer choices and choose the one that matches your anticipated answer best.
6) If you don’t find the answer that you were looking for, keep asking yourself: what must be true from this information that my notes are referring to around the key words from the question.

4

Attitude

What is the professor’s attitude toward those who take the existence of groundwater for granted? / What is the professor’s opinion about using pterosaur ancestors to learn more about pterosaurs themselves?

(criticism, neutrality, or support)
1) Read the question to understand what information you are being asked to find.
2) Identify the key words in the question to search for in your notes.
3) Start searching your notes for the key words or synonyms of them.
4) When you find the key words, remind yourself of the question and scan your notes for adjectives and other words that indicate mood or feeling. Are there any words present that point to: criticism, neutrality, or support?
5) Once you have thought up what you think is a good, rough answer, check the answer choices and choose the one that matches your anticipated answer best.

5

Purpose

why does the professor mention
why does the professor say

1) Read the question to understand what you’re being asked.
2) Identify the key words.
3) Search for and find those key words or synonyms of them in your notes.
4) Remember the information you heard around these key words and understand that the purpose of our key word is to explain or expand on the information that came before.
5) Look for any words in your notes that will help you understand the connection between your key words and the words that came before in your notes: adverbs, questions, topic shifts, etc.
6) Think of an answer on your own to the best of your ability.
7) Examine all of your answer choices and choose an answer choice that reflects your rough idea of the answer.

Support (it's true, consequently, of course)
Oppose (in contrast, however, on the other hand)
Further explain (what does this mean, to clarify, for example)

Listening = reading read loud to you!