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Flashcards in M-3 Solutions Deck (38):
1

List the 6 strong acids

HCl, HBr, HI, HNO3, H2SO4, HClO4

2

Strong or weak acid?

HClO

Weak

3

Strong or weak acid?

HCl

strong

4

Strong or weak acid?

HClO4

strong

5

Strong or weak acid?

HNO2

weak

6

Strong or weak acid?

HNO3

strong

7

Strong or weak acid?

HBr

strong

8

Strong or weak acid?

HBrO3

weak

9

Strong or weak acid?

HI

strong

10

Strong or weak acid?

HIO2

weak

11

Strong or weak acid?

H2SO3

weak

12

Strong or weak acid?

H2SO4

strong

13

Strong or weak acid?

H2S

weak

14

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

NaCl(s)

NaCl(s) → Na+(aq) + Cl-(aq)

15

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

MgCl2(s)

MgCl2(s) → Mg2+(aq) + 2 Cl-(aq)

16

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

NaNO3(s)

NaNO3(s) → Na+(aq) + NO3-(aq)

17

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

Mg(NO3)2(s)

Mg(NO3)2(s) → Mg2+(aq) + 2 NO3-(aq)

18

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

HCl(g)

HCl(g) → H+(aq) + Cl-(aq)

19

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

HF(g)

HF(g) → HF(aq)

HF is a weak acid so only a small portion of it will dissociate in water.  The majority of the HF will dissolve into tje water but remain in molecular form.

20

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

HNO3(g)

HNO3(g) → H+(aq) + NO3-(aq)

 

21

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

HNO2(g)

HNO2(g) → HNO2(aq)

Nitrous acid is a weak acid so only a very small portion will dissociate in water.  Most of the nitrous acid will remain in moelcular form but dissolved in the water.

 

22

Write out the dissociation in water equation for tjhe following electrolytes:

C6H12O6(s)

C6H12O6(s) → C6H12O6(aq)

Glucose is a nonelectrolyte.  While it does dissolve in water it does not dissociate at all.

 

23

Place the following in increasing order of concentration of particles in solution.  All solution are 1.0 M

CO(NH2)2, NaCl, HCl, CaCl2, HF 

CO(NH2)2 < HF < NaCl = HCl < CaCl2

(non, weak, strong, strong, strong) 

 

24

Place the following in increasing order of conductivity.  All solution are 0.10 M

C6H12O6, HNO3, NaBr, Na2SO4, HC2H3O2 

C6H12O6 < HC2H3O2 < HNO3 = NaBr < Na2SO4

(non, weak, strong, strong, strong) 

*polyatomic ions do not dissociate further

 

25

Place the following in increasing order of conductivity. 

5.0 M C6H12O6, 1.0 M HNO3, 1.5 M NaBr, 1.0 M Na2SO4, 1.0 M HC2H3O2 

C6H12O6 2H3O2 3 < NaBr = Na2SO4

(non, weak, strong, strong, strong) 

*polyatomic ions do not dissociate further

 

26

Place the following in increasing order of concentration of particles in solution.  All solution are 1.0 M

5.0 M CO(NH2)2, 1.0 M NaCl, 1.0 M HCl, 1.5 M CaCl2, 1.0 M HF 

HF < HCl = NaCl < CaCl2 < CO(NH2)2 

(slightly > 1.0 M, 2.0 M, 2.0M, 4.5 M, and 5.0 M) 

 

27

I pull 1.0 L of a 5.0 M sodium chloride solution off of the shelf.  How many moles of sodium chloride can be found in the solution?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

5.0 moles

28

I pull 1.0 L of a 2.0 M sodium chloride solution off of the shelf.  How many grams of sodium chloride were used to make this solution?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

2.0 moles = 114 grams

29

I pull 1.0 L of a 2.0 M sodium chloride solution off of the shelf.  How many moles of sodium chloride can be found in 0.50 L of this solution?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

1.0 moles

30

I pull 1.0 L of a 2.0 M sodium chloride solution off of the shelf.  How many grams of sodium chloride were needed to make 0.50 L of this solution?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

1.0 mole = 57 g of NaCl

31

What volume of 2.0 M sodium chloride can I make from 28.5 g of salt?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

28.5 g = 0.5 moles of NaCl so I can make 0.25L of 2.0 M solution. (0.50mol/.250L = 2.0 M)

32

What volume of 2.0 M sodium chloride can I make from 228 g of salt?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

228 g = 4.0 moles of NaCl so I can make 2.0 L of 2.0 M solution. (4.0mol/2.0L = 2.0 M)

33

I pull 1.0 L of a 2.0 M sodium chloride solution off of the shelf.  What is the concentration of the solution if I add another 1.0 L of water?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

2.0 moles in the solution, now it has a volume of 2.0 L so new concentration is 1.0 M (2.0 mol/2.0 L)

34

I pull 1.0 L of a 2.0 M sodium chloride solution off of the shelf.  What is the concentration of the solution if I evaporate away half of the water?  

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

2.0 moles in the solution, now it has a volume of 0.50 L so new concentration is 4.0 M (2.0 mol/0.50 L)

35

Which solution contains more moles of sodium chloride?  

Solution A: 0.50 L of 4.0 M NaCl

Solution B: 2.0 L of 1.0 M NaCl

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

Each solution contains 2.0 moles of NaCl

36

If I remove a 100 mL sample of solution A and a 100 mL sample of solution B, which sample contains more moles of sodium chloride?  

Solution A: 0.50 L of 4.0 M NaCl

Solution B: 2.0 L of 1.0 M NaCl

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

Solution A has 4 times the concentration of solution B so any volume of solution A will have 4 times the number of moles of NaCl as an equivalent volume of solution B

37

Which solution will require a greater volume to provide 0.50 moles of NaCl for a reaction?  

Solution A: 0.50 L of 4.0 M NaCl

Solution B: 2.0 L of 1.0 M NaCl

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

Solution B is 4 times less concentrated than Solution A so it takes 4 times the volume to deliver an equivalent number of moles of NaCl as solution A.

38

How much water should I add to 0.50 L of 2.0 M NaCl in order to create a 1.0 M NaCl solution?

Note: Sodium chloride has a molar mass of 57g/mol.

 

I order to cut the concentration in half, I need to double the volume.  I need to add 0.50 L of water