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Flashcards in Neonatal Isoerythrolysis Deck (15)
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1

Which foals most commonly develop isoerythrolysis?

Foals born to multiparous mares

2

When does isoerythrolysis occur in a foal?

<7d (typically 2-3d)

3

What are the most common erythrocyte antigens implicated in neonatal isoerythrolysis?

Aa and Qa

4

What is neonatal isoerythrolysis?

Type 2 HS between RBC antigens of foal and antibodies of the mare that are ingested with colostrum

5

Where are neonatal isoerythrolysis antigens inherited?

From the sire

6

Why do mule foals have a higher incidence of neonatal isoerythrolysis?

"Donkey factor" RBC antigen

7

How is a mare first exposed to foreign RBC antigens in order to produce the antibodies that cause neonatal isoerythrolysis?

Blood transfusion, exposure to fetal blood

8

What are the three things that must be present for a foal to develop neonatal isoerythrolysis?

1. Foal RBC antigen inherited from sire
2. Maternal antibodies against foal RBC antigen
3. Neonatal ingestion of colostrum

9

What are clinical signs of neonatal isoerythrolysis?

Tachycardia, tachypnea/dyspnea, icterus, lethargy

10

What clinicopathologic changes support a diagnosis of neonatal isoerythrolysis?

Hyperbilirubinemia and anemia

11

What blood test do you do to dx neonatal isoerythrolysis?

Jaundice foal agglutination test

12

What is a jaundice foal agglutination test?

See if agglutination occurs between foal RBCs and mare's colostrum

13

How do you treat neonatal isoerythrolysis if the foal is <24h old?

Provide alternate source of milk and passive transfer

14

How do you treat a neonatal isoerythrolysis if the foal is >24h old?

Monitor PCV and rate of decline

15

When is a blood transfusion indicated?

PCV <12%