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Flashcards in Notecards 1 Deck (88):
1

Circa

approximately

2

representational art

The visual portrayal of someone or something.

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abstract art

A 20th century style of painting in which nonrepresentational lines, colors, shapes, and forms replace accurate visual depiction of objects, landscape, and figures. The subjects often stylized, blurred, repeated or broken down into basic forms so that it becomes unrecognizable. Intangible subjects such as thoughts, emotions, and time are often expressed in abstract art form.

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non-representational/non-objective art

Nonrepresentational art refers to compositions which do not rely on representation or mimesis to any extent. Abstract art , nonfigurative art, nonobjective art, and nonrepresentational art are related terms that indicate a departure from reality in the depiction of imagery in art.

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portrait

a painting, drawing, photograph, or engraving of a person, especially one depicting only the face or head and shoulders.

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still life

A representation of inanimate objects, as a painting of a bowl of fruit.

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illusion of space

Middle ground, foreground and background

8

perspective (one point)

Lines that appear to go away from the viewer and meet in the middle. Horizon line and vanishing point.

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foreground

appears to be in the front of the picture, objects are more detailed.

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middleground

objects in middle of painting

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background

objects appear farther from the viewer and less detailed.

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horizon line

Line that forms the visual boundary between the sky and ground.

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vanishing point

a point where the line seems to converge and disappear

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relief

a sculpture that protrudes from a flat surface

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Intaglio

an incised carving sunk below a flat surface

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In the round

a sculpture that is made to be looked at in 360 degrees

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Paleolithic art

the old stone age

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naturalism

Faithful adherence to nature; factual or realistic representation.

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abstraction

The process of creating art that is not representational or based on external reality or nature.

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portable art

Portable art (sometimes called mobiliary art) refers to the small examples of Prehistoric art that could be carried from place to place, which is especially characteristic of the Art of the Upper Palaeolithic.

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stationary art

prehistoric art that is on a wall or cave

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figurative art

Representing a form or figure in art that retains clear ties to the real world.

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non-figurative art

not representing or imitating external reality or the objects of nature; "a large abstract painting" abstractionist, nonobjective, abstract.

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twisted perspective

A convention of representation in which part of a figure is shown in profile and another part of the same figure is shown frontally.

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Neolithic art

all arts and crafts created by societies who had abandoned the semi-nomadic lifestyle of hunting and gathering food in favour of farming and animal husbandry.

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henge

a prehistoric monument consisting of a circle of stone or wooden uprights.

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trilithon

an ancient stone monument consisting of two upright megaliths carrying a third as a lintel.

28

cylinder seal

A cylinder seal is a small round cylinder, typically about one inch in length, engraved with written characters or figurative scenes or both, used in ancient times to roll an impression onto a two-dimensional surface, generally wet clay.

29

cuneiform characters

means 'wedge-shaped' and comes from the Latin cuneus (wedge). It is based on the appearance of the strokes, which were made by pressing a reed stylus into clay. Sumerian Language

30

stele

a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected in the ancient world as a monument. Grave steles were often used for funerary or commemorative purpose

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iconography

Subject matter in visual art, often adhering to particular conventions of artistic representation, and imbued with symbolic meanings.

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ziggurat

a rectangular stepped tower, sometimes surmounted by a temple. Ziggurats are first attested in the late 3rd millennium BC and probably inspired the biblical story of the Tower of Babel

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hierarchy of scale

Hierarchical proportion is a technique used in art, mostly in sculpture and painting, in which the artist uses unnatural proportion or scale to depict the relative importance of the figures in the artwork.

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cylindrical seal

- small pierced object like a long bead that is carved in reverse (intaglio) with a unique image and sometimes the name of the owner
-the seal was rolled over with clay of a tablet and functioned as a signature

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register

a horizontal level in a work that consists of several levels, especially where the levels are clearly separated by lines; modern comic books typically use similar conventions.

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wall reliefs

Relief is a sculptural technique where the sculpted elements remain attached to a solid background of the same material. The term relief is from the Latin verb relevo, to raise. To create a sculpture in relief is to give the impression that the sculpted material has been raised above the background plane.

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composite creature

Creature made with assorted body parts from different animals usually symbolizes a divinity

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lamassu

is an Assyrian protective deity, often depicted as having a human's head, a body of a bull or a lion, and bird's wings. In some writings, it is portrayed to represent a female deity.

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apadana

the great audience hall in ancient Persian palaces

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formal frontality

Most statues show a formal frontality, meaning they are arranged straight ahead, because they were designed to face the ritual being performed before them.

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divine cult statues

a cult image is a human-made object that is venerated or worshipped for the deity, spirit or daemon that it embodies or represents. ... Cult of images is the practice of worshipping or venerating religious or cult images representing divine figures.

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registers

a horizontal level in a work that consists of several levels, especially where the levels are clearly separated by lines; modern comic books typically use similar conventions. It is thus comparable to a row, or a line in modern texts.

43

hierarchy of scale

Hierarchical proportion is a technique used in art, mostly in sculpture and painting, in which the artist uses unnatural proportion or scale to depict the relative importance of the figures in the artwork.

44

hieroglyphs

decorative characters carved on Egyptian monuments. The term is now mainly used to refer to the system of writing used by the ancient Egyptians.

45

faience

Egyptian faience is a sintered-quartz ceramic displaying surface vitrification which creates a bright lustre of various colours, with blue-green being the most common. Defined as a “material made from powdered quartz covered with a true vitreous coating, usually in a transparent blue or green isotropic glass,"

46

raised relief

Relief is a sculptural technique where the sculpted elements remain attached to a solid background of the same material. The term relief is from the Latin verb relevo, to raise. To create a sculpture in relief is to give the impression that the sculpted material has been raised above the background plane.

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sunk relief

sculptural relief in which the outlines of modeled forms are incised in a plane surface beyond which the forms do not project.

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mastaba

rectangular superstructure of ancient Egyptian tombs, built of mud brick or, later, stone, with sloping walls and a flat roof

49

ben-ben stone

Benben was the mound that arose from the primordial waters Nu upon which the creator god Atum settled in the creation story of the Heliopolitan form of Ancient Egyptian religion. The Benben stone (also known as a pyramidion) is the top stone of the Egyptian pyramid.

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ka statue

A ka statue is a type of ancient Egyptian statue intended to provide a resting place for the ka (life-force or spirit) of the person after death.

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Old Kingdom Art

The pyramids, the seated scribe

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New Kingdom Art

House Altar (Amarna Period)
Portrait Head of Queen Tiye
Bust of Nefertiti
Ramesses II
King Tut

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Amarna Period Art

a style adopted in the Amarna Period during and just after the reign of Akhenaten (r. 1351–1334 BC) in the late Eighteenth Dynasty, during the New Kingdom. ... Amenhotep IV was one of the first to practice monotheism, the belief in just one god. Curved people, swollen bellies

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Cylcadic art

Cycladic art therefore comprises one of the three main branches of Aegean arT. Small wooden woman carvings with their arms crossed.

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Minoan art

Bronze Age Crete, lots of pottery. Nature designs.

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Mycenaean art

influenced art in greek and archaic periods.

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Geometric art

Geometric abstraction is a form of abstract art based on the use of geometric forms sometimes, though not always, placed in non-illusionistic space.

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krater

a large vase in Ancient Greece, particularly used for watering down wine.

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amphora

a tall ancient Greek or Roman jar with two handles and a narrow neck.

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black figure

black- and red-figure techniques were used in Athens to decorate fine pottery while simpler, undecorated wares fulfilled everyday household purposes

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red figure

The style is characterized by drawn red figures and a painted black background.

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Archaic art

rchaic Greek world had become involved in an active trade network around the Aegean. It was this trade network which was the source of the orientalizing influence on Greek art in the early part of the Archaic period.

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Kouros

the modern term given to free-standing ancient Greek sculptures that first appear in the Archaic period in Greece and represent nude male youths

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contrapposto

an asymmetrical arrangement of the human figure in which the line of the arms and shoulders contrasts with while balancing those of the hips and legs.

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Classical art

Ancient Greek art stands out among that of other ancient cultures for its development of naturalistic but idealized depictions of the human body, in which largely nude male figures were generally the focus of innovation.

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canon

the body of rules, principles, or standards accepted as axiomatic and universally binding in a field of study

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pediment

usually of a triangular shape, placed above the horizontal structure of the entablature, typically supported by columns.

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frieze

a long narrow band of sculpture that runs along the architrave of a Greek temple or another building.

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column

a structural element that transmits, through compression, the weight of the structure above to other structural elements below

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capital

forms the topmost member of a column

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Doric order

consists typically of a channeled column without a base, having as a capital a circular echinus supporting a square abacus, above which come a plain architrave, a frieze of triglyphs and metopes, and a cornice, the corona of which has mutules on its soffit.

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Ionic order

An Ionic column is eight times taller than it is wide and has a scroll-like capital.

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entablature

a horizontal part in classical architecture that rests on the columns and consists of architrave, frieze, and cornice.

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metope

is a rectangular architectural element that fills the space between two triglyphs in a Doric frieze, which is a decorative band of alternating triglyphs and metopes above the architrave of a building of the Doric order.

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caryatid

Caryatid is the name given to an architectural column which takes the form of a standing female figure.

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symmetria

an artistic composition should consist of clearly definable parts

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Hellenistic art

The Hellenistic period covers the period of Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire. Has more ages than greek sclupture and pops out of the space more.

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mosaic

A mosaic is a piece of art or image made from the assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials.

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rock-cut facade

like petra

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broken pediment

pediment, as over a doorway or window, having its raking cornice interrupted at the crown or apex

81

tholos

a circular building with a conical or vaulted roof and with or without a peristyle, or surrounding colonnade.

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cella

the inner chamber of a temple in classical architecture, or a shop facing the street in domestic Roman architecture, such as a domus.

83

betyls

refer to the famous god blocks found in Petra

84

chimera

a fire-breathing female monster with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail.

85

fibula

is a brooch or pin for fastening garments. The fibula developed in a variety of shapes, but all were based on the safety-pin principle.

86

Etruscan necropolis

only surviving evidence of Etruscan residential architecture. The necropolis of Tarquinia, also known as Monterozzi, contains 6,000 graves cut in the rock. It is famous for its 200 painted tombs, the earliest of which date from the 7th century BC.

87

sarcophagus

a stone coffin, typically adorned with a sculpture or inscription and associated with the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Rome, and Greece

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terracotta

unglazed, typically brownish-red earthenware, used chiefly as an ornamental building material and in modeling