Parliamentary Law Making - Influences on Parliament (Political, Public Opinion & Media) Flashcards Preview

Law - Law Making > Parliamentary Law Making - Influences on Parliament (Political, Public Opinion & Media) > Flashcards

Flashcards in Parliamentary Law Making - Influences on Parliament (Political, Public Opinion & Media) Deck (22):
1

What is a manigesto and why is it published? - Political influence.

In general elections all political parties publish a manifesto – list of reforms they want to carry out if elected.

2

What does the party with the most MPs do after a general election? - Political influence.

Become the next gov, which then has the whole life of Plm (5 years) to bring in the promised reforms as AoPs.

3

When does the government announce its plans for new laws? - Political influence.

At the opening of each session of Plm – usually once a year - and in the Queens Speech (which is usually written by the PM or other senior ministers for the Queen).

4

Why is being democratic an advantage of Political influences on Parliament?

Gov has been democratically elected so has mandate to make laws set out in its manifesto.

5

Why is certainty an advantage of Political influences on Parliament?

Queens Speech and manifesto set out gov legislative programme for the next Plm sessions. Reform proposals are ready to be made.

6

Why is efficiency an advantage of Political influences on Parliament?

Gov has majority in HoC so it can pass any legislation it wants.

7

Why is inefficiency and cost a disadvantage of Political influences on Parliament?

If a new party is elected they may repeal or change previous laws that were passed.

8

Why is having a small government majority of MPs in the House of Commons a disadvantage?

It means that gov must compromise and may not be able to pass laws in the manifesto – like the Conservative / Liberal Democrat coalition gov of 2010-2015 and the Conservative gov elected in 2017.

9

Why are political influences on Parliament undemocratic?

MPs are persuaded to vote within their party and not the constituents they represent. With a large majority gov they can pass any legislation they want, (“elective dictatorship”).

10

How is uncertainy a disadvantage of political influences on Parliament?

Gov don’t always follow their manifestos so don’t produce promised laws.

11

What may the government do when the public have a strong oppinion on a topic? - Public Opinion & Media

The gov may bow to such opinion.

12

What does the media do to influence Parliament? - Public Opinion & Media.

Media brings issues of public interest to gov attention and world issues to public attention.

13

Give an example of a media and public campaign that lead to government action - Public Opinion & Media.

News of the World’s “Name and Shame” campaign concerning paedophiles in 2000 – led to law being passed requiring police to keep a register of convicted paedophiles.

14

Give a second example of a media and public campaign that lead to government action - Public Opinion & Media.

Snowdrop campaign was set up in response to Dunblane School Massacre in 1996 – led to bans on handguns.

15

Give an example of a media campaign that lead to government action - Public Opinion & Media.

After media campaigns concerning the acquittal of those clearly responsible for the Stephen Lawrence murder, the Criminal Justice Act reformed the “Double Jeopardy” rule – allowed suspects to be retried for a crime they’ve already been acquitted from if they're new compelling evidence.

16

How is public opinion and the media raising government awearness an advantage?

Raising gov awareness of concerns about the law after events means that the gov is answerable to the public (Snowdrop).

17

How is it that the media agenda being influenced can be an advantage?

After events, the media can then take further and influence gov (Snowdrop).

18

How is the government being influenced by public opinion and the media a democratic advantage?

The public and media can scrutinise and influence gov through all legislative process.

19

What is a disadvantage of the media influencing public opinion, in turn influencing Parliament?

The public can be manipulated by the media as media manipulate events to sell more or shift public opinion.

20

What is the issue with the public having a very strong opinion on a topic?

The public can resort to criminal behaviour to promote cause – 2015 student protest against tuition fees.

21

What is the issue with the government acting too quickly to media and public opinion?

“Knee-jerk reaction” resulting in poorly drafted legislation – Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 following a series of attacks on children by dogs.

22

What is wrong with the media being bias when influencing Parliament?

News reports can be politically bias – most papers support Conservative Party so only show one side of arguments. If legislation does get passed then it only suits the needs of conservatives and everyone else may not get their voices heard.