Physiological changes and adaptation in the older adult Flashcards Preview

BOARDS: peds/geriatrics > Physiological changes and adaptation in the older adult > Flashcards

Flashcards in Physiological changes and adaptation in the older adult Deck (16):
1

What is the gene regulation theory of aging?

senescence (aging) results from changes in gene expression
- long life has a genetic component

2

What endocrine axis is the master regulator for physiological adjustments necessary for preservation and maintenance of internal homeostasis?

hypothalamo-pituitiary-adrenal axis
- theory that aging/stressors can cause this to weaken or decrease adaptational capacity

3

T/F: As we age, we lose type I and type II fibers.

false, just type II
- actually gain more type I

4

What muscular changes are associated with aging?

- more rapid fatigue
- loss of type II fibers
- decreased muscle strength and power
- loss of muscle mass

5

What happens to cartilage as we age?

becomes stiffer, erodes

6

What happens to the discs in our spine as we age?

lose water content and become flatter

7

T/F: Motor units increase as we age.

true, d/t loss of motorneurons

8

T/F: Reaction time and movement time increase as we age.

true

9

T/F: Stressing repetitive movements would be a good motor learning strategy for older adults.

true, to reduce confusion/memory issues and cement the learning in their head

10

What does the visual field of a person with glaucoma look like?

tunnel vision: lose peripherals until they progress to total blindness

11

What does vision with cataracts look like?

cloudyness of lens resulting in central loss of vision, then peripheral
- issues with glare, general darkening of vision, loss of acuity/distortion

12

What does vision with macular degeneration look like?

central loss, may progress to total blindness

13

T/F: Diabetic retinopathy causes central vision impairments.

true
- full blindness is rare

14

What medications can cause fuzzy vision?

antihistamines, tranquilizers, antidepressants, steroids

15

What's the difference between conductive and sensorineural hearing loss?

conductive = mechanical damage to external auditory canal, eardrum, or middle lear
- results in all-frequency hearing loss, tinnitus

sensorineural = hearing loss from noise damage, trauma, disease, drugs

16

What happens to BPs when we age?

systolic and diastolic rise, S>D