Poetry - Power and Conflict Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Poetry - Power and Conflict Deck (76):
1

Who wrote ‘Charge of the light Brigade’?

Alfred Lord Tennyson

2

When was ‘Charge of the light Brigade’ written?

1854

3

6 themes in ‘Charge of the light Brigade’

War
Conflict
Patriotism
Sacrifice
Life and death
References to religious ideas

4

Which war is ‘Charge of the light Brigade’ based on?

Crimean War - British troops fighting in Russia

5

Describe the use of weapons in ‘Charge of the light Brigade’

There were basic guns and cannons but people would still use horses to attack

6

What happened during a battle in ‘Charge of the light Brigade’?

A miscommunication sent the light brigade charging head first into the cannons of the other side - huge catastrophe, many died. The men were respected for following orders

7

Who was Tennyson (‘Charge of the light Brigade’)?

Poet Laureate (explains the propagandist tone)

8

What is the structure of ‘Charge of the light Brigade’ and what might this show?

Diameter and dactylic (ONE-two-three, ONE-two-three)
Could show the sudden charge and then collapse or the sound of horses galloping

9

How many stanzas are in ‘Charge of the light Brigade’ and what could this show?

6 - could show stages of battle

10

Describe the rhyme in ‘Charge of the light Brigade’

Military rhyme - similar to the sound of marching drums or horse hooves. This reflects the military nature of conflict

11

5 key quotations of ‘Charge of the light Brigade’

‘Honour the Light Brigade, // Noble six hundred!’
‘the valley of Death’
‘Rode the six hundred’
‘Into the jaws of Death, // Into the mouth of hell’
‘Then they rode back, but not // Not the six hundred.’

12

Who wrote ‘Exposure’?

Wilfred Owen

13

When was ‘Exposure’ written?

1917

14

4 themes of ‘Exposure’

War
Conflict
Man v. nature
Futility of war

15

About Wilfred Owen (‘Exposure’)

He was a soldier in WW1
He died before the end of the war but experienced the horror of the conditions on the front line

16

Why was the war criticised (‘Exposure’)?

Because of the huge loss of life for very little gain (60,000 British soldiers died for 6 miles of land)

17

Why are Wilfred Owen’s poems angry?

Because the soldiers were in horrible conditions whereas the generals lived in comfort

18

What’s the effect of using ellipses, caesuras and repetition in ‘Exposure’?

To create an on-going sense of waiting and boredom

19

How many stanzas are there in ‘Exposure’?

8 with a consistent use of half line to end (reinforces nothing happening)

20

What’s the use of para-rhyme in ‘Exposure’?

To create the sense of unsettled ness which the soldiers felt

21

What’s the use of onomatopoeia and alliteration in ‘Exposure’?

To emphasise the atmosphere and the sound of weather

22

5 key quotations of ‘Exposure’

‘But nothing happens.’
‘sudden successive flights of bullets stream the silence’
‘We cringe in holes’
‘Worried by silence, sentries whisper, curious, nervous’
‘merciless iced east winds that knife us...’

23

Who wrote ‘Bayonet Charge’?

Ted Hughes

24

When was ‘Bayonet Charge’ written?

1957

25

7 themes of ‘Bayonet Charge’

Conflict
Transformation
Humanity
Nature
War
Patriotism
Effects of conflict

26

What is a Bayonet and how was it used? (‘Bayonet Charge’)

A blade attached to a rifle - used to stab enemy soldiers

27

The nameless soldier in ‘Bayonet Charge’ seems to become more of a .... than a ....

Weapon , man

28

What’s the focus in ‘Bayonet Charge’?

Mans impact on nature

29

Who was Ted Hughes? (‘Bayonet Charge’)

Was an RAF serviceman so the poem includes natural and historical ideas

30

Who was Ted Hughes’ father? (‘Bayonet Charge’)

A veteran

31

How many stanzas are in ‘Bayonet Charge’ and what is unique about them?

3 stanzas - most are blank verses with no set structure

32

What do the different lines in the stanzas if ‘Bayonet Charge’ show?

The place of the charges (some fast, some stumbling)

33

During the end of ‘Bayonet Charge’, what happens to the poem and what could this symbolise?

Picks up speed, could show the soldier approaching his destination/doom

34

What’s the use of enjambment and caesuras in ‘Bayonet Charge’?

Give a bizarre and erratic speed to the poem. Can also give structure to the charge and the confusion and intensity of battle

35

5 key quotations of ‘Bayonet Charge’

‘There up a yellow hare that rolled like a flame’
‘His terror’s touchy dynamite’
‘In row-seamed hot khaki, his sweat heavy’
‘King, honour, human dignity, etcetera’
‘Blue crackling air’

36

Who wrote ‘Remains’?

Simon Armitage

37

When was ‘Remains’ written?

2008

38

5 themes of ‘Remains’

Conflict
Effects of conflict
Power
Mental health
Memory

39

What’s the happens (the story) at the beginning of ‘Remains’?

Soldiers are on patrol and fire at bank robbers (looters) as one might have a gun. The soldiers never forget

40

What’s the illness associated with ‘Remains’?

PTSD - caused by a horrific memory and leads to nightmares, panic attacks and suicide thoughts

41

How many stanzas are there in ‘Remains’ and what’s special about the last one?

8 - last is a coupler which leaves the poem on a dramatic end note

42

Why is there conversational asides and syntax in ‘Remains’?

Because it’s written as a monologue

43

How are enjambment and caesuras used in ‘Remains’?

To emphasise the natural speech patterns of the speaker

44

How are colloquialism (slang) and personal pronouns used in ‘Remains’?

Gives the poem a sense of realism

45

Describe the rhyme in ‘Remains’

Loose set of rhymes, often internal which is used to give a childish aspect to the horror of war (could suggest how numb the soldier feels)

46

5 key quotations of ‘Remains’

‘tosses his guts back into his body’
‘And the drink and the drugs won’t flush him out-‘
‘probably armed, possibly not’
blood-shadow stays on the street’
‘One of my mates’

47

Who wrote ‘Poppies’?

Jane Weir

48

When was ‘Poppies’ written?

2009

49

4 themes of ‘Poppies’

Conflict (behind the scenes view)
Effects of war (emotions such as fear, pride and sadness)
War
Memory

50

What is ‘Poppies’ about?

A mother who’s son has gone to war. Includes flashbacks of the mother and son’s lives

51

How does ‘Poppies’ end?

At the memorial, suggesting the son died, mother fears the worst

52

What is ‘Poppies’ written as?

A monologue

53

What’s the rhyming scheme in ‘Poppies’?

There isn’t one

54

How many stanzas are there in ‘Poppies’ and how are they structured?

4 - structured along events from the life of mother and son

55

What does the dive suggest in ‘Poppies’?

The son has died

56

What do the 3 mothers do in ‘Poppies’?

1 - looks back at Remembrance Day and the idea of the poppy (triggers memory)
2 - helping her son get ready and seeing him off
3 - explores emptiness that is left in his absence

57

How is enjambment and familiar nouns used in ‘Poppies’?

They enhance the idea of natural tone and the mother’s voice

58

5 key quotations of ‘Poppies’?

‘my stomach busy // making tucks, darts, pleats’
‘I listened, hoping to hear // your playground voice’
‘the world overflowing // like a treasure chest.’
‘I went into your bedroom, // released a song bird from its cage.’
‘this is where it has led me,’

59

Who wrote ‘War Photographer’?

Carol Ann Duffy

60

When was ‘War Photographer’ written?

1985

61

4 themes of ‘War Photographer’

Conflict (war zone v. ‘Rural England’)
War
Futility of war
Effects of conflict

62

How are old style photos made? (‘War Photographer’)

Must be done in a dark room, lit with red light
Photos are developed using chemicals which slowly bring out the photo
Hung to dry

63

What is ‘War Photographer’ about?

About a war photographer who has returned home and is developing his photos

64

How many stanzas are there in ‘War Photographer’?

4

65

What could the regular structure of ‘War Photographer’ suggest?

It could represent the order he is giving to the chaos of his photos and the mechanical process he’s going through to develop them

66

What’s the rhyming pattern in ‘War Photographer’?

Rhyming couplets interspaced with non-rhyming lines

67

What is ‘War Photographer’ written as?

A narrative, leading the reader through the processing of his photos (sense of detachment, people lose lives)

68

5 key quotations of ‘War Photographer’

‘spools of suffering set out in ordered rows’
‘fields which dot explode beneath the feet // of running children in nightmare heat.’
‘The reader’s eyeballs prick // with tears between the bath and pre-lunch beers.’
‘they do not care.’
‘All flesh is grass.’

69

Who wrote ‘Checking out me History’?

John Agard

70

When was ‘Checking out me History’ written?

2007

71

3 themes of ‘Checking out me History’

Racial identity
Conflict
Power

72

What does ‘Checking out me History’ show the reader?

How history taught and the conflict between facts and truths which is hidden by race or gender. Gives examples of powerful, black people who were involved in conflicts

73

What does the irregular rhyme and short, mixed enjambment create in ‘Checking out me History’?

Creates the tone of a man speaking out and is angry/frustrated

74

What does ‘Checking out me History’ capture?

The accent and rhythm of the Caribbean ethnicity of the poet

75

In ‘Checking out me History’, some words are in italics, what does this show?

Almost like a song with a rhythm that seems to suggest stories passed down in song or to a beat. This emphasises the history, the way history is passed on and the repetitive names and dates he was taught in English schools

76

4 key quotations of ‘Checking out me History’

‘Blind me to me own identity’
‘dem’
‘de cow who jump over de moon’
‘I carving out me own identity’