R-1 Stoichiometry Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in R-1 Stoichiometry Deck (25):
1

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

For every 1 mole of nitrogen gas consumed with excess hydrogen gas, _____ moles of ammonia gas are produced 

 

2 moles of ammonia

2

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

For every 2 moles of nitrogen gas consumed with excess hydrogen gas, _____ moles of ammonia gas are produced 

 

4 moles of ammonia

3

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

For every 0.5 mole of nitrogen gas consumed with excess hydrogen gas, _____ mole(s) of ammonia gas are produced 

 

1 mole of ammonia

4

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

For every 1 mole of nitrogen gas consumed _____ mole(s) of hydrogen gas are also consumed. 

 

3 mole of hydrogen gas

5

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

For every 2 mole of nitrogen gas are consumed _____ mole(s) of hydrogen gas are also consumed. 

 

6 mole of hydrogen gas

6

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

For every 0.5 moles of nitrogen gas are consumed _____ mole(s) of hydrogen gas are also consumed. 

 

1.5 mole of hydrogen gas

7

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

When 2 moles of ammonia are created, _____ moles of hydrogen gas must be consumed

 

3 mole of hydrogen gas

8

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

When 4 moles of ammonia are created, _____ moles of hydrogen gas must be consumed

 

6 moles of hydrogen gas

9

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) Fill in the blank:

When 1 moles of ammonia are created, _____ moles of hydrogen gas must be consumed

 

1.5 moles of hydrogen gas

10

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) 

1 mole of nitrogen gas is combined with 1 mole of hydrogen gas.  What is the limiting reagenet?

 

 

hydrogen gas

11

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) 

3 moles of nitrogen gas are combined with 1 mole of hydrogen gas.  What is the limiting reagenet?

 

 

hydrogen gas

12

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) 

1 moles of nitrogen gas is combined with 4 moles of hydrogen gas.  What is the limiting reagenet?

 

 

nitrogen gas

13

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2NH3(g) 

10 moles of nitrogen gas are combined with 31 moles of hydrogen gas.  What is the reagent in excess?

 

 

hydrogen gas

14

True/False

The limiting reagent is always the reactant present in lesser amounts.

 

 

False

15

True/False

The limiting reagent is always the reactant with the smaller coeeffcient in the balanced reaction equation

 

 

False

16

CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O

Based on the following model, what is the limiting reagent

 

 

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O2

17

CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O

Based on the following model, what is the limiting reagent

 

 

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O2

18

Why is oxygen present in both the before and the after sides of the following diagram?

 

 

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It is the reagent in excess.  The hydrogen runs out.

19

The following diagram describes what is left over after the reaction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen to form methanol.  What should be in the before box?  CO + 2 H2 → CH3OH

 

 

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1 CO molecule and 4 H2 molecules

20

Nitrogen atoms are purple and hydrogen atoms are clear.  Write out the balanced chemical equation represented by the following model.

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N2 + 3 H2 → 2NH3

You need to reduce to lowest form and cancel like terms on each side of the equation

21

Carbon atoms are grey, hydrogen atoms are clear, and oxygen atoms are red.  Write out the balanced chemical equation represented by the following model.

Q image thumb

CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O

You need to reduce to lowest form and cancel like terms on each side of the equation

22

The point durring a titration when both reactants have been perfectly used up.

Equivalence point

23

The point during a titration when the indicator changes to let you know to stop the titration.

End point

24

The equivalence point and end point are the same thing in a titration. (True or False)

False.  We try to set up a system where they are the same but the end point typically lags the equivalence point but some fraction of a drop.

25

Based on the following reaction model.  is this reaction at the equivalence point?  How can you tell?

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Yes.  Both reactants have been consumed.  There is no reagent in excess.