+RNA enveloped (corona, Rubella, Toga, Flavi, Arboviruses) Flashcards Preview

Microbiology Block 1 > +RNA enveloped (corona, Rubella, Toga, Flavi, Arboviruses) > Flashcards

Flashcards in +RNA enveloped (corona, Rubella, Toga, Flavi, Arboviruses) Deck (47):
1

what is the second most common cause of the common cold?

corona viruses

2

corona virus are responsible for these 2 disease?

1) SARS

2) MERS

3

what is the clinical presentation of coronavirus?

upper respiratory tract infection 

*no fever, cough, sore throat

4

what cells does coronavirus infect primarily?

epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract 

5

SARS is usually limited to a travel history of what?

toronto and far eash china

6

what is the clinical presentation of SARS?

atypical pneumonia

fever

dyspnea and progressive hypoxia

diarrhea

Chest X ray shows patchy distribution of focal interstitial infiltrates

7

what is another name for rubella?

3 day measles

8

what is the biology of rubella?

envelped ss+RNA

9

what cells will rubella infect?

respiratory cells

10

what is the progression of infection?

1) it infects upper respiratory tract and spreads to lymph nodes

2) viremia and spread to whole body 

11

why does the rubella virus spread?

because of unvaccination

12

13

what is the clinical presentation for rubella?

fever

coryza (runny nose)

conjunctiva (red eyes)

cough

erythematous maculo-papular rash

14

when does the rubella rash disappear?

72 hours

15

how does the erythematous maculo papular rash in rubella appear?

first on face and spreads to trunk

16

how is rubella prevented?

through vaccine = MMR

17

what causes this? what is this?

Q image thumb

rubella, erythematous maculo papular rash

18

what can be a complication that can happen with rubella?

congenita rubella syndrome

19

what is congenital rubella syndrome?

rubella virus crosses placenta when “sero-negative”mother has primary infection.

20

what determines the seriousness of congenital rubella syndrome?

the time period of infection

21

what are some of the symptoms seen in congenital rubella syndrome?

thrombocytopenic purpura (blu-berry muffin baby)

microcephaly

mental retardation

cataracts

22

what confirms a diagnosis of rubella?

presense of anti-rubella IgM or IgG

23

what is the biology of Togavirus?

enveloped ss+RNA

24

what are the 2 families of togavirus?

1) Arbovirus

2) Rubivirus

25

how are togavirus transmitted?

mosquitoes

26

what are the 3 viruses in togavirus?

1) EEE, WEE, VEE

2) Chikagunya

3) West Nile

27

what symptom will EEE, WEE, VEE cause?

encephalitis

28

what symptom will chikugunya cause?

joint pain and rash

29

what symptom is seen in west nile virus?

encephalitis

30

what mosquito causes EEE, WEE, VEE?

culex

31

what mosquito causes chikugunya?

aedes

32

what mosquito causes west nile?

culex

33

what is the biology of flavivirus?

it is enveloped single stranded +RNA

34

how is flavivirus transmitted?

mosquitoes (arthropod borne) and if transfusion of infected blood or transplantation 

35

what is the treatment for yellow fever?

vaccine

36

when is arbovirus mostly affecting patients? (when are patients mostly going to be seen with this?)

summer

37

what is the host for arbovirus? what is important about this?

humans, they are dead end host (once infect human it cannot further spread)

38

what is the incubation period for EEE (eastern equine encephilitis), WEE (western equine encephilitis), VEE (venezuelan equine encephilitis)?

 

4-10 days

39

what is the clinical presentation for EEE, WEE, VEE?

fever

headache

vomiting

Tremors

convulsions

disorientation

40

how is EEE, WEE, VEE different from herpes simplex virus?

there are no flu-like symptom preceding the symptoms

41

how is the recovery for EEE, WEE, VEE?

complete when there is no central nervous system involvement.

42

what is the clinical presentation for flavivirus?

tremor

convulsions

spastic paralysis

 

43

what is the clinical presentation for dengue 1st time infection?

fever

severe joint pain (1 week duration)

 

44

what is the clinical presentatin for dengue haemorragic fever?

fever

hemorrhagic manifestations

 thrombocytopenia

leaky capillaries 

muscle and bone pain

45

what is the clinical presentation for Dengue Haemorrhagic Shock Syndrome?

fever

hemorrhagic manifestations

 thrombocytopenia

leaky capillaries 

muscle and bone pain

shock

46

what is the clinical presentation of yellow fever?

Severe high fever,

jaundice,

GI bleeding (GI) “Black vomit”,

shock

failure of multiple organs.

47

how is yellow fever prevented?

 Attenuated Live-virus vaccine