+RNA naked virus (polio, coxsackie, echo, rhino) Flashcards Preview

Microbiology Block 1 > +RNA naked virus (polio, coxsackie, echo, rhino) > Flashcards

Flashcards in +RNA naked virus (polio, coxsackie, echo, rhino) Deck (50):
1

what is characteristic of the picornaviridae family of viruses?

they are all naked, icosahedral capsid and ss+RNA

2

what viruses compose the picornaviridae family of viruses?

1) rhinovirus

2) poliovirus

3) coxsackie A and B 

4) Echovirus

5) Hepatitis A virus

3

what is very important about rhinovirus?

it is the most common cause of the common cold

4

is there a vaccine for rhinovirus? why?

no, because there are 100 serotypes and they mutate very often (antigenic drift)

5

what is the biology of rhinovirus?

naked ss+RNA

6

how does rhinovirus trasmit?

aerosol

hand to nose transmission

7

what cells does rhinovirus target in primary infection?

targets respiratory epithelial cells

8

what cells and substances are important in order to get rid of rhinovirus?

interferon, CTL, and IgA

9

what is the treatment for rhinovirus?

no treatment

10

how infectious is rhinovirus?

highly infectious

11

when a cell is infected with rhinovirus, the cells will release what? these are responsible for what?

histamine and bradykinin, responsable for runny nose

12

what is the clinical presentation of rhinovirus?

sneezing, 

rhinorrhea (runny nose)

clear mucus secretion 

nasal obstruction

mild sore throat 

couch

headache

13

what are the 4 characteristics of enteroviruses?

1) are naked ss+RNA

2) acid stable

3) usually more common from summer to autumn

4) transmitted through fecal oral route or respiratory droplets

5) controlled by washing hands

14

what are the enteroviruses?

1) poliovirus

2) echovirus

3) coxsackie

4) enterovirus

15

what cells does enteroviruses primarily target?

respiratory and GI epithelial cells

16

what is the enterovirus course of infection?

1) virion inhaled or ingested

2) virus targets resp or GI epithelial cells

3) viremia (causes flu like symptoms)

4) virus crosses blood-brain barrier causing neuro. sympt.

17

what is asceptic meningitis?

swelling of the meninges not caused by bacteria 

18

how do you know asceptic meningitis is not caused by bacteria?

spinal tap reveals clear CSF

19

how is asceptic meningitis treated?

no treatment, self-resolving

20

what is the biology of the poliovirus?

naked ss+RNA

21

how is poliovirus transmitted?

fecal-oral route

fecal contaminated water (common source) 

22

how is polio prevented?

polio vaccine

23

most poliovirus infection are what?

asymptomatic

24

what are the 3 clinical presentations of poliovirus?

1) asymptomatic

2) abortive poliomyelitis - is a nonspecific febrile disease

3) nonparalytic poliomyelitis, paralitic poliomyelitis, asceptic meningitis - the virus goes to the CNS

 

25

what is the clinical presentation of paralytic poliovirus?

1st phase: flu-like symptoms

2nd phase: cytolytic infection of anterior horn of spinal cord and motor cortex of brain

26

how does paralytic poliovirus look?

- asymmetric flaccid paralysis without sensory loss

- can be one limb or all four

27

what does bulbar polio cause?

can involve muscles of pharynx, vocal cords, and respiration

28

most poliovirus patients that die, are due to which polio?

bulbar polio

29

what is post-polio syndrome?

deterioration of originally infected muscles

30

how is the atrophy that occurs in polio?

it is asymmetrical 

31

how is poliovirus prevented?

using salk vaccine and sabin vaccine

32

what type of vaccine is the salk vaccine? how is it taken?

killed, inactivated polio virus

 

taken as a shot

33

what type of vaccine is the sabin vaccine? how is it taken?

live attenuated 

 

taken orally 

34

what does the salk and sabin vaccine do?

causes a stornger or more efficient IgA response

35

what does Coxsakie type A cause?  how does the symptom look?

acute hemorrhagic conjunctivits

pain, edema, photophobia, foreign body sensation

36

what is another name for coxsackie type A?

hand-foot-mouth disease

37

what virus causes this?

Q image thumb

coxsackie type A

38

what is the clinical presentation of coxsackie type A?

First: lesion in mouth and tongue 

1-2 days later: lesions appear in hands and feet

39

what is very important about coxsakie type B?

most common cause of viral myocarditis and pericarditis in newborns

40

what 3 things can coxsackie type B cause?

1) pleurodynia: pleuritic chest pain

2) myocarditis and pleurocarditis: unexplained and sudden heart failure

3) pancreatitis

41

what is the clinical presentation of coxsackie type B?

fever

chest pain

arrhythmia (myocardial cell necrosis)

heart failure 

42

in coxsackie type B, when there is myocarditis, biopsy will reveal what?

lymphocytic infiltrate

43

what causes this? what is this?

Q image thumb

coxsackie type B, leukocyte infiltration of myocardium

44

what is very important about echovirus?

it is the most common cause of asceptic meningitis

45

how can echovirus spread?

transplacentally

46

how can coxsackie type B be transmitted?

transplacentally 

47

how is echovirus treated?

no treatment, self-resolving

48

what is the clinical presentation for echovirus?

fever

headache

vomiting

stiff neck

49

how do you confirm a diagnosis of any enterovirus?

CSF clear with leukocytes and slightly raised protein

50