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Year 12 P.E revision > energy systems > Flashcards

Flashcards in energy systems Deck (29):
1

fuels required for resynthesis of ATP

Chemical Fuel:
Creatine Phosphate

Food Fuels:
carbs
fats
protein

2

food fuels: carbs

body's preferred fuel source usually during exercise
sugars and starches found in cereal, fruit, bread, pasta

3

food fuels: fats

acts as concentrated fuel storage in muscles and body's adipose tissue.
main source of fuel during rest and submaximal exercise

4

food fuels: protein

used mainly for growth and repair
acts as a last resort fuel source
building blocks of tissue
breaks carbs to glucose, stored in liver and muscles as glycogen
minimal contribution during exercise
found in meat, fish, eggs, grains

5

chemical fuel: Creatine Phosphate

• contains a high-energy phosphate bond for the rapid
release of energy
• Limited storage of CP within the muscle.

6

ATP

ATP is the energy source for all muscular movements

7

ATP-CP: characteristics

Fuel Source:
Creatine Phosphate

Intensity of activity:
Maximal Intensity, 95+% MHR

fatigue factor: depletion of atp and cp

Amount of energy produced:
Limited yield, 0.7-1 ATP

Duration of activity: 0-10 seconds

8

ATP-CP

produces energy by breaking down CP
Energy produced at explosive rate due to simple anaerobic chemical reactions that take place.

9

Anaerobic glycolysis

produces energy by partially breaking down Glucose
anaerobically (no oxygen).
Energy produced at a fast rate due to simple anaerobic chemical reactions that take place.

10

Anaerobic glycolysis; characteristics

Exercise:
Predominant system for high intensity exercise up to 75 seconds in duration.

Fuel source:
Glycogen

Intensity of activity High intensity exercise:
85 − 95% MHR

Duration of activity:
10-75 seconds

fatigue factor: H+ ions

Amount of energy produced:
Small yield, 2-3 ATP

11

aerobic glycolysis

energy by breaking down glycogen or free fatty acids. Energy is produced at a slow rate due to complex chemical reactions
can continue to supply energy for many hours.

12

aerobic glycolysis: characteristics

Exercise:
Predominant system for long duration, low/submaximal intensity exercise.

Fuel source:
rest; FFA
Submax; Carbs

Intensity of activity:
Submaximal intensity exercise
(70 − 85% MHR)
Resting/low intensity exercise
(> 70% MHR)

Duration of activity:
75+ seconds

fatigue factor: dehydration, fuel depletion

amount of energy produced;
Large yield- 38 ATP

13

oxygen uptake

VO2
represents the maximum volume of oxygen able to be
taken up by, transported to, and used by the body for energy production.

14

factors affecting oxygen uptake

body size
gender
training
age
genetics

15

oxygen uptake at rest

the demand for ATP energy is relatively small.
heart rate and oxygen uptake remain at low levels.

16

oxygen uptake beginning of exercise

oxygen uptake increases as the body attempts to meet the increased oxygen demand.
The increased oxygen demand results from the need to produce more energy for ATP resynthesis.

17

oxygen deficit

start of exercise where the oxygen demand exceeds the oxygen supply.
During o2 the body must obtain ATP from its anaerobic energy systems.

18

steady state

oxygen supply = oxygen demand.
almost all of the required energy for ATP resynthesis is supplied aerobically.

19

EPOC

after completion of exercise oxygen consumption remains elevated, despite a reduction in the demand for ATP energy.
also referred to as Oxygen Debt.

20

energy interplay

atp-cp to anaerobic, to aerobic

21

fuel depletion

Once CP has depleted, energy for ATP resynthesis must come via the breakdown of glucose, which is broken down at a slower rate.

22

accumulation of by-products

ATP-CP System: ADP and AMP
Anaerobic glycolysis: H+ ions
Aerobic system: H2o, Co2, Heat

23

passive recovery

Link to fatigue factor: Fuel Depletion (CP)
muscle’s fuel CP is rapidly restored when recovery involves total passive rest.

24

active recovery

Link to fatigue factor: (H+ ions)
low intensity speeds up the removal of H+ ions by:
• Maintaining higher blood flow, and therefore oxygen delivery to the muscles

25

rehydration

Link to fatigue factor: Dehydration

Recommendations:
• Include water (hydration), carbohydrates (refuel), and
electrolytes (salts)
• Consume fluids throughout the first two hours of post-exercise time

26

refuelling: dietary

Link to fatigue factor: Fuel Depletion (Glycogen)
pre and post training:
yoghurt
protein bar
cereal and milk

27

elevated body temperature

body redistributes higher percentage of cardiac output to the skins surface
body cools down via evaporation
increased rates of dehydration (increased blood pressure and nervous fatigue)

28

LIP

Lactic inflection point
exercise intensity beyond which lactate production exceeds removal
sometimes referred to as lactate threshold

29

the aerobic systems role in LIP and exercise recovery

oxygen supply meets demand the levels may go up to the LIP
any accumulated lactic acid/metabolic by products have opportunity to be removed or converted back into glycogen to be used as the energy source