Section 1C Latin to English Flashcards Preview

Reading Latin: Text (Jones and Sidwell, 2nd edition) > Section 1C Latin to English > Flashcards

Flashcards in Section 1C Latin to English Deck (64):
1

(Eucliō ex aedibus in scaenam intrat clāmatque)

(Euclio (coming) out of the house enters [onto] the stage and shouts.)

2

EVC.: “exī ex aedibus! exī statim!

EUCLIO: “Come out of the house! Come out at once!

3

“cūr nōn exīs, serua mea?”

“Why do you not come out of the house, my slave woman?

4

STAPH. (ex aedibus exit et in scaenam intrat)

STAPHYLA (She comes out of the house and enters [onto] the stage.)

5

“quid est, mī domine?

“What is it, my master?

6

“quid facis?

“What are you doing?

7

“quārē mē ex aedibus expellis?

“Why do you drive me out of the house?

8

“serua tua sum.

“I am your slave (woman).

9

“quārē mē uerberās, domine?”

“Why are you beating me, master?”

10

EVC. “tacē! tē uerberō quod mala es, Staphyla.”

EUCLIO.: “Be silent! I am beating you because your are bad, Staphyla.”

11

STAPH. “egone mala?

STAPHYLA: Am I bad, master?”

12

“cūr mala sum?

“Why am I bad?

13

“misera sum, sed nōn mala, domine.

“I am unhappy, but not bad, master.

14

(sēcum cōgitat) sed tū īnsānus es!”

(she thinks to [with] herself) “But you are crazy.

15

EVC. “tacē! exī statim!

EUCLIO: “Be silent! Come out at once!

16

“abī etiam nunc . . . etiam nunc . . . ohē!

“Go away further still ... further still ... stop!

17

“stā! manē!”

“Stand (there)! Wait!”

18

(Eucliō sēcum cōgitat)

(Euclio thinks to [with] himself.)

19

“periī! occidī!

“I’m lost! I’m done for!

20

“ut mala mea serua est!

“How bad is my slave!

21

“nam oculōs in occipitiō habet.

“For she has eyes in the back of (her) head.

22

“ut thēsaurus meus mē miserum semper uexat!

“How the treasure always trouble me, wretched (as I am).

23

“ut thēsaurus multās cūrās dat!”

“How the gives many worries!”

24

(clāmat iterum)

(He shouts again.)

25

“manē istīc!

“Wait there!

26

“tē moneō, Staphyla!

“I’m warning you, Staphyla!”

27

STAPH. “hīc maneō ego, mī domine.

STAPH.: “I (myself) am staying here, my master.

28

“tū tamen quō īs?”

“You, however, where are you going?”

29

EVC. “ego in aedīs meās redeō (sēcum cōgitat) et thēsaurum meum clam uideō.

EUC. “I (myself) am returning [in]to my house (he thinks to [with] himself) and I look at my my treasure secretly.

30

“nam fūrēs semper in aedīs hominum dīuitum ineunt. . .”

“For thieves always enter into the houses of rich people ...”

31

(Eucliō ē scaenā abit et in aedīs redit.)

(Euclio leaves [from] the stage and returns [in]to (his) house.)

32

STAPH. “ō mē miseram! dominus meus īnsānus est.

STAPH. “O wretched me! My master is crazy.

33

“per noctem numquam dormit, sed peruigilat.

“He never sleeps by night, but stays awake.

34

“per diem mē ex aedibus semper expellit.

“By day he always drives me out of the house.

35

“quid in animō habet?

“What does he have in mind?

36

“quārē senex tam īnsānus est?”

“Why is the old man so crazy?”

37

(Eucliō tandem ex aedibus exit et in scaenam redit.)

(At length Euclio leaves [from] (his) house and returns to the stage.)

38

EVC. (sēcum cōgitat) “dī mē seruant!

EUC. (He thinks to [with] himself) “The gods preserve me!

39

“thēsaurus meus saluus est!

“My treasure is safe!

40

(clāmat) “nunc, Staphyla, audī et operam dā!

(he shouts) “Now, Staphyla, hear (me) and pay attention!

41

“ego tē moneō.

“I am warning you.

42

“abī intrō et iānuam occlūde.

“Go [away] inside and shut the door.

43

“nam ego nunc ad praetōrem abeō – pauper enim sum.

“For I am going [away] now to the praetor—for I am a poor man.

44

“sī uidēs arāneam, arāneam seruā.

“If you see a cobweb, look after the cobweb.

45

“mea enim arānea est.

“For the cobweb is mine.

46

“sī uīcīnus adit et ignem rogat, ignem statim exstingue.

“If a neighbor approaches and asks (for) fire, immediately extinguish the fire.

47

“sī uīcīnī adeunt et aquam rogant, respondē ‘aquam numquam in aedibus habeō.’

“If the neighbors approach and ask (for) water, answer ‘I never have water in the house.’

48

“sī uīcīnus adit et cultrum rogat, statim respondē ‘cultrum fūrēs habent.’

“If a neighbor approaches and asks (for) a knife, immediately answer ‘thieves have the knife.’

49

“sī Bona Fortūna ad aedīs it, prohibē!”

“If Good Luck comes to the house, stop (her)!”

50

STAPH. “Bona Fortūna numquam ad tuās aedīs adit, domine.”

STAPH. “Good Luck never comes to your house, master.”

51

EVC. “tacē, serua, et abī statim intrō.”

EUC. “Be quiet, slave (woman), and go [away] inside at once.”

52

STAPH. “taceō et statim abeō.”

STAPH. “I am silent and I am leaving at once.”

53

(Staphyla abit et sēcum murmurat)

(Staphyla departs and mutters to [with] herself.)

54

“ō mē miseram! ut Phaedra, fīlia Eucliōnis, mē sollicitat!

“O wretched me!s How Phaedra, Euclio’s daughter, worries me!

55

“nam grauida est Phaedra ē Lycōnidē, uīcīnō Eucliōnis.

“For she is pregnant by [from] Lyconides, Euclio’s neighbor.

56

“senex tamen ignōrat, et ego taceō, neque cōnsilium habeō.”

“The old man, however, does not know, and I am silent, and I also do not [neither do I] have a plan.”

57

(exit ē scaenā Staphyla)

(Staphyla goes [out] from the stage.)

58

(Euclio now describes how, albeit reluctantly, he is going to the forum to collect his praetor’ s free hand-out – to allay suspicions that he is wealthy)



 



EVC. “nunc ad praetōrem abeō, nimis hercle inuītus.


 



 



 EUC. “Now I am going [away] to the praetor, (all) too unwilling, by Hercules.


59

“nam praetor hodiē pecūniam in uirōs dīuidit.

“For today the praetor is dividing money among the men.

60

“sī ad forum nōn eō, uīcīnī meī ‘hem!’ inquiunt, ‘nōs ad forum īmus, Eucliō ad forum nōn it, sed domī manet.

“If I do not go to forum, my neighbors say ‘Well, we [ourselves] are going to the forum, (but) Euclio doesn’t go to forum, but remains home.

61

“‘aurum igitur domī senex habet!’

“‘Therefore the old man has gold at home!’

62

“nam nunc cēlō thēsaurum sēdulō, sed uīcīnī meī semper adeunt, cōnsistunt, ...

“For now I am carefully hiding the treasure, but my neighbors are always approaching, (and) they stand around, ...

63

... ‘ut ualēs, Eucliō ?’ inquiunt, ‘quid agis ?’

“... (and) ‘How are you, Euclio,’ they say, ‘what are you up to?’

64

“mē miserum! ut cūrās thēsaurus meus dat multās!”

“Wretched me! How my treasure gives cares in great number [many cares]!”

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