Section 1F English to Latin Flashcards Preview

Reading Latin: Text (Jones and Sidwell, 2nd edition) > Section 1F English to Latin > Flashcards

Flashcards in Section 1F English to Latin Deck (80):
1

(All the cooks enter.)

(omnēs coquī intrant.)

2

(The names of the cooks are Pythodicus, Anthrax, (and) Congrio.)

(nōmina coquōrum Pȳthodicus, Anthrax, Congriō sunt.)

3

(Pythodicus is the cooks’ leader.)

(Pȳthodicus dux coquōrum est)

4

PYTHODICUS: “Come, cooks! Enter [onto] the stage, criminals!

PYTHODICVS: “īte, coquī! intrāte in scaenam, scelera!

5

“Listen! My master wants to make the wedding-rites today.

“audīte! dominus meus nūptiās hodiē facere uult.

6

“Therefore your task is to cook a huge dinner.”

“uestrum igitur opus est cēnam ingentem coquere.”

7

CONGRIO: “Whose daughter does he want to marry?”

CONGRIŌ: “cuius fīliam dūcere uult?”

8

PYTH.: “The daughter of (his) neighbor Euclio, Phaedra.”

PYTH.: “fīliam uīcīnī Eucliōnis, Phaedram.”

9

ANTHRAX: “Immortal gods, do you [plural] know the man?

ANTHRAX: “dī immortālēs, cognōuistisne hominem?

10

“A stone is not so dry as Euclio (is).”

lapis nōn ita est āridus ut Eucliō.”

11

PYTH.: “What are you saying?”

PYTH.: “quid dīcis?”

12

ANTH.: “If from a fire smoke comes outside, he shouts ‘My money has disappeared! Lead me to the praetor (for a lawsuit)!’

ANTH.: “dē igne sī fūmus forās exit, clāmat ‘mea pecūnia periit! dūc mē ad praetōrem!’

13

“When he wants to sleep, he places a huge bag onto (his) mouth, while he sleeps.”

“ubi dormīre uult, follem ingentem in ōs impōnit, dum dormit.”

14

PYTH.; “Why?”

PYTH.: “quārē?”

15

ANTH.: “He doesn’t want to lose (his) breath.

ANTH.: “animam āmittere nōn uult.

16

“If he washes, he doesn’t want to pour out water.

“sī lauat, aquam profundere nōn uult.

17

“And at the barber’s he doesn’t want to lose (his) nail-clippings, but collects (them) all and carries them home.”

“et apud tōnsōrem praesegmina āmittere nōn uult, sed omnia colligit et domum portat.”

18

PYTH.: “Now be silent and listen, all (you) cooks.

PYTH.: “nunc tacēte et audīte, coquī omnēs.

19

“What do you yourselves want to do?

“quid uōs facere uultis?

20

“Whose home do you want to enter, (you) criminals?

“cuius domum īre uultis, scelera?

21

“What do you yourself want, Congrio?”

“quid tū uīs, Congriō?

22

CON.: “I want to enter the home of a rich man...”

CON. “uolō ego domum uirī dīuitis inīre . . .”

23

ALL THE COOKS: “We all want to enter the home of Megadorus, a rich man, not the home of Euclio, a a poor man and a sad (one).”

OMNĒS COQVĪ: “nōs omnēs domum Megadōrī, uirī dīuitis, inīre uolumus, nōn domum Eucliōnis, uirī pauperis et trīstis.”

24

PYTH.: “How Euclio troubles us!.

PYTH.: “ut Eucliō uōs uexat!

25

“Now be silent, all of you.”

“nunc tacēte uōs omnēs.

26

(to Anthrax) “You, go [away] to the home of Megadorus;

(to Anthrax) “tū abī domum Megadōrī;

27

(to Congrio) “You, to the home of Euclio.”

(to Congrio) “tū, domum Eucliōnis.”

28

CON.: “How the poverty of Euclio troubles me!

CON.: “ut uexat mē Eucliōnis paupertās!

29

“For Euclio, we know, is miserly and sad.

“nam Eucliō, scīmus, auārus et trīstis est.

30

“In (his) house there is [are] nothing except emptinesses and cobwebs.

“in aedibus nīl nisi ināniae et arāneae ingentēs sunt.

31

“Euclio has nothing, he gives nothing.

“nihil habet Eucliō, nihil dat.

32

“Therefore it is difficult to cook a dinner at Euclio’s.”

“difficile est igitur apud Eucliōnem cēnam coquere.”

33

PYTH.: “Are you stupid, Congrio?

PYTH.: “stultusne es, Congriō?

34

“For it is easy to cook a dinner at Euclio’s.

“facile enim est apud Eucliōnem cēnam coquere.

35

“For there is no crowd.

“nam nūlla turba est.

36

“If you want anything, carry it with you from your house; for Euclio has nothing!

“sī quid uīs, ex aedibus tuīs tēcum portā: nam nihil habet Eucliō!

37

“But Megadorus is rich.

“sed Megadōrus dīues est.

38

“At Megadorus’ there is a huge crowd, enormous silver vases, many clothes, much gold.

“apud Megadōrum est ingēns turba, ingentia uāsa argentea, multae uestēs, multum aurum.

39

“If the slaves lose anything, they cry immediately:

“sī quid seruī āmittunt, clāmant statim:

40

“‘The cooks are carrying away all the goods!

‘coquī auferunt omnia bona!

41

“‘All cooks are thieves!

‘fūrēs sunt coquī omnēs!

42

“‘Seize the outrageous cooks!

‘comprehendite coquōs audācīs!

43

“‘Flog the criminals!’

‘uerberāte scelera!’

44

“But at Euclio’s it is easy to take away nothing: for he has nothing!

“sed apud Eucliōnem facile est nihil auferre: nihil enim habet!

45

“Come with me, source of (all) wickenesses!”

“ī mēcum, scelerum caput!”

46

CON.: “I’m going.”

CON.: “eō.”

47

CON.: “eō.”

CON.: “attatae! cīuēs omnēs, date uiam!

48

“I’m done for, I’m dead, miserable me!”

“periī, occidī ego miser!”

49

EUC. “O evil criminal! Come back, cook!

EVC. (calling to him from the house) “ō scelus malum! redī, coque!

50

“Where are you yourself fleeing, head of criminals? Why?

“quō fugis tū, scelerum caput? quārē?”

51

CON.: “I am fleeing because you want to beat me.

CON.: “fugiō ego quod mē uerberāre uīs.

52

“Why are you shouting?”

“cūr clāmās?”

53

EUC.: “Because you have a huge knife, criminal!”

EVC.: “quod cultrum ingentem habēs, scelus!”

54

CON.: “But I am a cook.

CON.: “sed ego coquus sum.

55

“We are all cooks.

“nōs omnēs coquī sumus.

56

Therefore we all have huge knives.”

“omnēs igitur cultrōs ingentīs habēmus.”

57

EUC.: “You are all criminals.

EVC.: “uōs omnēs scelera estis.

58

“What [of] business is there in my house?

“quid negōtī est in aedibus meīs?

59

“I want to know everything [all things].”

“uolō scīre omnia.”

60

CON.: “Be quiet, therefore.

CON.: “tacē ergō.

61

“We are cooking a huge dinner.

“ingentem coquimus cēnam.

62

“For today are the wedding-rites of your daughter.”

“nūptiae enim hodiē fīliae tuae sunt.”

63

EUC. (Thinks to himself) “O outrageous crime!

EVC. (sēcum cōgitat) “ō facinus audāx!

64

“The man is a liar: he wants to find all my gold.”

“mendāx homo est: omne meum aurum inuenīre uult.

65

(out loud) “Stay, all (you) cooks.

(out loud) “manēte, coquī omnēs.

66

“Stand there.”

“stāte istīc.”

67

(Euclo enters (his) home.)

(Eucliō domum intrat.)

68

(At length he comes out of (his) home and enters onto the stage.)

(tandem domō exit et in scaenam intrat.)

69

(He carries the pot in his hands.)

(aulam in manibus fert)

70

EUC. (Thinks to himself.) “Now I am carring the whole treasure in this pot.”

EVC.: (sēcum cōgitat) “nunc omnem thēsaurum in hāc aulā fero.

71

“By Hercules now I will always carry all the gold with me.”

“omne hercle aurum nunc mēcum semper portābō.

72

(out loud) “Come inside, everyone.

(out loud) “īte omnēs intrō.

73

“Cook, or leave the house, criminals!”

“coquite, aut abīte ab aedibus, scelera!”

74

(The cooks leave. Euclio thinks to himself.)

(abeunt coquī. Eucliō sēcum cōgitat)

75

“The deed is outrageous, when a poor person wants to do business with a rich man.

“facinus audāx est, ubi homo pauper cum dīuite negōtium habēre uult.

76

“Megadorus wants to find my gold and carry it off.

“Megadōrus aurum meum inuenīre et auferre uult.

77

“Therefore he is sending cooks into my house.

“mittit igitur coquōs in meās aedīs.

78

“I say ‘cooks,’ but they are all thieves.

“‘coquōs’ dīcō, sed fūrēs sunt omnēs.

79

“Now what [of] plan is the best?

“nunc quid cōnsilī optimum est?

80

“Miserable me!”

“mē miserum!”

Decks in Reading Latin: Text (Jones and Sidwell, 2nd edition) Class (80):