SECTION 7 EMERGENCY SERVICES AND EMERGENCIES 2 Flashcards Preview

MATS PART 2 GIBRALTAR > SECTION 7 EMERGENCY SERVICES AND EMERGENCIES 2 > Flashcards

Flashcards in SECTION 7 EMERGENCY SERVICES AND EMERGENCIES 2 Deck (37):
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4.11 HELICOPTER EMERGENCIES

In the event of a Helicopter total electrical failure. The helicopter should make a direct approach to the threshold of the duty RW, keeping clear of other traffic and land on the shoulder and shut down.
In the event of an Aerodrome lighting failure during night helicopter operations then ATC will rig a T of LE58s at the threshold of the duty runway in order to assist the helicopter to land.

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4.12 HELICOPTER RADIO FAILURE PROCEDURES

The helicopter should over fly the duty RW at 500ft, flashing the landing lamp, carry out a circuit and obey ATC light signals.

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4.13 ACCIDENTS IN SPAIN

If an aircraft crashes in Spain within sight of ATC and close to the frontier fence, the crash crews are to be positioned at the nearest point on Gibraltar territory. If the crash is further inland, the RAF Duty Officer will decide on the course of action in consultation with the AFRS Crew Commander.

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CABLE ENGAGEMENTS

A cable engagement is normally an EMERGENCY STATE 2.
The pilot will pass the weight and speed at time of engagement to ATC, who should inform Arrestor.
No pressure is to be applied to personnel to expedite runway clearance after an engagement, as recovery of aircraft and arresting cables can be hazardous.
Medical cover should remain in the vicinity of the cable until the rewind procedure is completed

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AIRCRAFT UNDERCARRIAGE MALFUNCTION - VISUAL INSPECTION
In the event of an aircraft requiring a visual undercarriage inspection, ADC is to carry out the following procedure:

Aircraft Undercarriage Malfunction - Inspection Procedure
A. Request that the Watch Manager / RAF Duty Officer or spare ATC personnel
go onto the ATC balcony, with binoculars if available.
B. Instruct the aircraft to over fly the runway at 300ft
C. Pass details of the inspection to the pilot
As the unit is not equipped with specialist light units, pilots should be warned, at night or in conditions of poor visibility, that it may be impossible to provide any detailed information

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4.16 AIRCRAFT GROUND FIRES

AIRCRAFT GROUND FIRES
When an aircraft on the ground reports that it may be on fire, or when an aircraft on the ground is advised of signs of fire, the surface wind, taken from the most appropriate anemometer, must be passed to the aircraft, either with the acknowledgement of the pilot’s report or together with the transmitted observation.

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LOGBOOK ENTRIES

The Aerodrome ATCA is to maintain a diary of events that may be transferred to the Watch Log on completion of an incident.

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METEOROLOGICAL SPECIAL REPORTS

When a crash or major incident takes place on, or in the vicinity of, the aerodrome the Watch Manager is to inform the duty Met Officer, who will raise a special weather report without delay. The report is to be attached to the Watch Log.

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TAPE IMPOUND REQUIREMENTS

Immediately following an accident or incident GRF are to be instructed to impound the relevant R/T recordings.

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RUNWAY/AERODROME INSPECTIONS

Where a possibility exists that the surface conditions may have been a contributing factor in any accident/incident the Watch Manager is to arrange for a MU-Meter run and the readings are to be retained.

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STAND DOWN OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

In the event of a STATE 1 the responsibility for standing down the various agencies and the termination of the incident rests with the Crew Commander/Incident Commander.
A STATE 2 or STATE 3 may terminated by ATC by the following broadcast.
"Emergency State 2/3 is terminated."

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ACCESS TO THE MANOUEVRING AREA

Following an emergency it is very important that access to the manoeuvring area is restricted to the essential emergency service vehicles and RAF personnel directly involved with the incident. Other agencies, including the ground handling staff and Terminal Management, may only be permitted access with the approval of the RAF Duty Officer.

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4.23 SUSPECTED COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

ICAO Annex 9, Chapter 8 requires that a Pilot in Command must promptly report a suspected communicable disease to ATC in order to facilitate provision for the presence of special medical personnel and equipment to manage the risks to public health.
In order to satisfy this requirement Watch Managers will advise the Terminal Manager of any report of suspected communicable disease from inbound aircraft. The Terminal Manager is then responsible for notifying the Gibraltar Health Authority, who will take appropriate action.

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Search and Rescue is defined as

the use of aircraft, surface craft, submarines, specialised rescue teams and equipment to search for and rescue personnel in distress on land or at sea.

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The responsibility for co-ordinating SAR operations within the Southern part of the Madrid FIR lies with

the Rescue Co-ordination Centre (RCC) at Seville ACC. Telephone communication between Gibraltar and Seville RCC is available using the Seville line to contact the Seville ACC Supervisor.

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The Gibraltar Maritime (Search and Rescue) Act 2005 has established a Maritime Search and Rescue Unit for Gibraltar under the responsibility of the Captain of the Port.

This unit will act as the Rescue Co-ordination Centre for incidents occurring within Gibraltar Territorial Waters.

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SAR - Assets available at Gibraltar

A. Vessels of the Gibraltar Squadron may be called out to assist with SAR duties by the GDP following their receipt of a crash message from ATC. They will normally only operate within 25 nm of Gibraltar. The vessel notice for sea response time will vary, between 10 minutes and 1 hour, depending on the Security Threat Level and time of day.
B. The Gibraltar Maritime Search and Rescue Unit
C. Aircraft at, or operating within the vicinity of, Gibraltar may be requested to give the SAR operation assistance.
D. Military ships visiting Gibraltar may be available in consultation with the RAF Duty Officer.

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Callout of the local SAR agencies should be by the use of the crash phone to GDP control or through the RAF Duty Officer. When the units are at sea they will be in contact with GDP control via TETRA or other radio communication.
The following are authorised to call out vessels of the Sqn for specific tasks:

A. ATC for Aircraft Emergency States
B. The RAF Duty Officer for other SAR tasks

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SAR Incidents – Watch Manager Actions

1. Ensure that ADC requests SAR assistance using the crash phone to GDP control, and passing all known details of the incident.
2. Pass all known details to Seville ACC supervisor.
3. Ensure that ATC and AMR services are fully manned as appropriate.
4. Inform RAF Ops of the incident or if RAF Ops are not available inform the RAF Duty Officer of the incident.
5. Maintain a full log of events.

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USE OF EMERGENCY FREQUENCIES

Frequencies available to both Seville ACC and Gibraltar ATC are:
VHF 121.5MHz
UHF 243.0MHz

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Frequencies 121.5 and 243.0 are automatically monitored on the approach room Mascot Talkdown position. Whenever ATC hears an emergency message they are to

pass information to Seville of the calls overheard, including DF bearings or position information.
If it appears that calls from aircraft requesting the Assistance are not being answered, or the aircraft are specifically requesting the Assistance from Gibraltar, then Approach Control should answer the call, provide as much the Assistance as possible, and co-ordinate any action taken with Seville ACC.

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6.1.2 UNVERIFIED HIJACK STATUS/POTENTIAL RENEGADE AIRCRAFT
Suspected hijacks or airborne security situations, where selection of A7500 code has not been made nor a definitive RTF call received by ATC, may be indicated by various means. Due to the infinite variety of possible situations, a complete and comprehensive list of suspicious aircraft/pilot activities cannot be prescribed.
The following examples represent situations that may represent an unusual event.

A. Unauthorised deviation from cleared flight profile.
B. Refusal or inability to comply with ATC instructions (including vectoring) with no good reason.
C. Loss of RTF contact particularly associated with flight profile deviation.
D. Unauthorised SSR code changes or extended use of IDENT.
E. Use of non-standard phraseology by the crew, or other covert attempt to highlight the situation (marked change in voice characteristics, etc).
F. Selection of A7600 (RTF) or A7700 (emergency) particularly associated with flight profile deviation.
G. Notification from non-official sources (e.g. news agencies, etc).
H. Open RTF transmitter from the cockpit.
I. Non – ATC related RTF transmission (e.g. political statement).
J. Non-specific threat passed via a third party.

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In the event that the General Manager/Watch Manager is made aware of a hijack or airborne security situation, the following details should be ascertained and passed to the watch supervisor at Seville ACC:

1. Aircraft callsign, type, operator and last assigned SSR code.
2. Point of departure and notified/intended destination.
3. Current position (bearing/distance from aeronautical reference point),
4. Level.
5. Expected route (either as per FPL or as notified via RTF).
6. Indicative factors of the aircraft’s hijack status (e.g. A7500 code selection/declaration on RTF/unusual event).
7. Current RTF frequency and controlling agency.

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In the event of pre-notification or free-call of an aircraft with the callsign DOUGHNUT,

the General Manager/Watch Manager is to be advised immediately. Such aircraft should be afforded Category “A” flight priority, and the purposes of the flight not discussed over the RTF. Further guidance may be sought from the RAF Duty Officer.

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Command of any operation against a hijacked aircraft will be

retained by HE the Governor and vested in the Central Decision Group.
Control is vested in the Commissioner of Police through the Incident Control Group.

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Hijack Notification – Aircraft inbound to Gibraltar

A. STN CDR 3522 / Published Callout List
B. GDP Control 2222 / 5026 / 3598 / 5674
C. CONVENT
(CLO TO HE) 5566 / 3500
D. RGP 5199 / 5004
E. ATE 3354

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The decision whether to accept a hijacked aircraft will be made by HE the Governor.
If shortage of time requires that the Watch Manager make this decision then if the aircraft is British owned and lacking fuel to reach the UK all assistance should be given.
All other aircraft should be discouraged from landing citing the following points:

A. Short runway.
B. Limited landing aids.
C. Off the rock communications problems.
D. Probable delay in getting clearance for Civilian aircraft to land at a Military aerodrome.
E. Difficult or hazardous landing conditions.
F. Work in progress on the aerodrome.
G. Shortage of suitable fuel.
H. Weakness of load bearing surfaces.
I. Availability of nearby and better equipped aerodromes.

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If the aircraft is intending to land at Gibraltar:

1. Log all details.
2. Obtain by RT aircraft callsign, type, POB, departure aerodrome, endurance, nationality and ETA.
3. Recall or divert all short endurance aircraft as authorised by the Stn Cdr/RAF Duty Officer.

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Hijacked Aircraft – Parking Priorities

1. North Side of the Runway at the 27 Threshold
2. North Side of the Runway - just West of the old AWES building
3. South Dispersal
4. Runway 27 Threshold.

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Aircraft Movements – Evacuation Procedure - Aerodrome Control

1. Co-ordinate actions with Approach Control and the Watch Manager.
2. Advise all aircraft on frequency of the situation by transmitting a general broadcast.
3. Deploy AFRS to aprons to provide fire cover for passengers and crew by the use of normal land line facilities to either the Fire Control Room or the Crew Room on 3411.
4. Refuse any further requests for push and start.
5. Instruct any aircraft that have pushed back or started engines, but not taxied, to return to stand and shut down.
6. If possible depart aircraft which have taxied.
7. If aircraft have taxied but it is not possible to depart them, then they should be held at a holding point, if on the runway they should be issued with instructions to vacate and hold on a taxiway.
8. Aircraft lined up should be departed and sent to the Approach frequency once airborne and established in the climb.
9. Aircraft in the take-off roll should be sent to the Approach frequency once airborne and established in the climb.
10. Aircraft departing should be advised that the airfield will be temporarily closed after their departure and will therefore not be available in the event of an emergency after take-off.
11. If possible, aircraft in the visual circuit should be landed and taxied to an apron.
12. Once Aircraft Safety Is Assured Evacuate The Building

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Building Evacuation – Resumption of Watch

A. Carry out Equipment Serviceability Checks
B. Carry out an Aerodrome Inspection
C. Check Frequencies to ascertain if any aircraft are on frequency.
D. Enter details of the evacuation and subsequent return in the ATC Watch Log.

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8.1 REPORTING ACTION – GENERAL GUIDANCE

ATCOs are to make reports of all details of any incident or accident that has occurred during the period of their watch in accordance with the GIB/MAN/001. Reports are normally to be completed before the ATCO departs the ATC tower at the end of that watch keeping duty and processed in accordance with the procedures laid down.
Watch Manager are to enter appropriate details in the ATC watch log, inform the Stn Cdr/RAF Duty Officer, and carry out his responsibilities in accordance with the manual.

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8.2 REPORTING ACTION – LOCAL PROCEDURES

Any local incidents which are not considered serious enough for formal action, or which require immediate local corrective action are to be brought to the attention of the GM / Stn Cdr / RAF Duty Officer.

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REPORTING ACTION – AAIB

Accident investigation in Gibraltar is carried out by the UK AAIB. All Aircraft Accidents and Serious Incidents occurring in the Overseas Territories should be reported to the AAIB on their 24 hour reporting number: (0044) 1252 512299
The definition of Aircraft Accidents and Serious Incidents are contained in the AAIB – Aircraft Accident Investigation in the Overseas Territories Document which is held in the approach room.
If the Watch Manager has any doubts concerning their responsibility for reporting any incident or accident they should seek advice from the AAIB.

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8.5 REPORTING ACTION – OIL SLICKS

The Spanish authorities have the responsibility for pollution surveillance and fisheries protection in the Straits. Aircraft operating under the callsign ORCA or LIMER are often used for this purpose. Reports from Pilots of Oil Slicks in the vicinity of Gibraltar should be passed to the Gibraltar Harbour Authorities and the Seville ACC Supervisor.

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8.6 REPORTING ACTION – AIRCRAFT LASER ATTACKS

Laser attacks on aircraft or ATC should be reported as MORs and details immediately passed on to the Royal Gibraltar Police for action In addition if it appears that such attacks have originated from Spain the Seville ACC Supervisor should also be advised of the details.

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REPORTING ACTION – DISRUPTIVE PASSENGERS
Four levels of disruptive passenger behaviour have been defined to give a common reference for characterizing an ongoing incident. Based on the degree of seriousness, ATC may be advised of a disruptive passenger’s behaviour utilising the following levels.

Level 1 – disruptive (suspicious or verbally threatening) behaviour;
Level 2 – physically abusive behaviour;
Level 3 – life-threatening behaviour; and
Level 4 – attempted or actual breach of the flight crew compartment.
This information should be relayed to the Supervisor at Seville ACC.
If the report is from an aircraft on the ground at Gibraltar, or intending to land at Gibraltar, the Royal Gibraltar Police should also be notified. The phraseology is directed by ICAO and distinct between Pilot and ATC (not ATC and police). When informing the RGP the threat level must be decoded.