Unit 11: Testing And Individual Differences Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Unit 11: Testing And Individual Differences Deck (14):
1

Validity

The extent to which a test measures or predicts what it is supposed to

2

Intelligence quotient (IQ)

Defined originally as the ratio of mental to chronological age multiplied by 100. On contemporary intelligence tests, the average performance for a give age is assigned a score of 100, with scores assigned to relative performance above or below average

3

Intelligence

Mental quality consisting of the ability to learn from experience, solve problems, and use knowledge to adapt to new situations

4

Creativity

The ability to produce novel and valuable ideas

5

Crystallized intelligence

Our accumulated knowledge and verbal skills; tends to increase with age

6

Fluid intelligence

Our ability to reason speedily and abstractly; tends to decrease during late adulthood

7

General intelligence (g factor)

A general intelligence factor that accosting to Spearman and others, underlies specific mental abilities and is therefore measured by every task on an intelligence test

8

Standardization

Defining uniform testing procedures and meaningful scores by comparison with the performance of a pretested group

9

Divergent thinking

Expands the number of possible problem solutions

10

Emotional intelligence

The ability to perceive, understand, manage, and use emotions

11

Factor analysis

A statistical procedure that identifies clusters of related items on a test; used to identify different dimensions of performance that underlie a person's total score

12

Mental age

A measure of intelligence test performance devised by Binet; the chronological age that most typically corresponds to a given level of performance. Thus, a child who does as well as the average 8-year-old is said to have a mental age of 8

13

Norm

An understood rule for accepted and expected behavior; "proper" behavior

14

Reliability

The extent to which a test yields consisted results, as assessed by the consistency of scores on two halves of the test, on alternate forms of the test, or on retesting