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Flashcards in Vocab Deck (1557):
1

Pillory

attack or ridicule publicly

he found himself pilloried by members of his own party

2

Windfall

a large amount of money that is won or received unexpectedly

members are to get an average £520 cash windfall for voting ‘yes’ to the merger

3

Oligopoly

the market condition that exists when there are few sellers, as a result of which they can greatly influence price and other market factors.

It worked in broadcast TV, when we had three big networks and they operated an oligopoly.

4

Chimerical

existing only as the product of unchecked imagination

for the time being, interplanetary travel remains a chimerical feature of life in the 21st century

5

carte blance

complete freedom to act as one wishes

the architect given carte blanche to design the store

6

Gerrymandering

to divide (a territorial unit) into election districts to give one political party an electoral majority in a large number of districts while concentrating the voting strength of the opposition in as few districts as possible

gerrymandering urban districts to give rural voters a majority

7

Filibuster

to obstruct with delaying tactics

they engaged in a filibuster that lasted for over a week

8

Technocracy

a system in which people with a lot of knowledge about science or technology control a society

Technocracy became a popular movement in the United States during the Great Depression when it was believed that technical professionals, like engineers and scientists, would have a better understanding than politicians regarding the economy's inherent complexity.

9

Fatalism

the belief that all events are predetermined and therefore inevitable

fatalism can breed indifference to the human costs of war

Determinism should not be confused with fatalism

10

schadenfreude

pleasure derived by someone from another person's misfortune

Jeremy had a feeling of schadenfreude when his ex-wife's second marriage failed

11

Askance

with an attitude or look of suspicion or disapproval

the reformers looked askance at the mystical tradition

12

Tectonic

having a strong and widespread impact

9/11 had a tectonic impact on airline securities

13

pastiche

An artistic work in a style that imitates that of another work, artist, or period

The movie is a skilful, witty pastiche of "Jaws".

14

Hodgepodge

mixture

the exhibit was a hodgepodge of mediocre art, bad art, and really bad art

15

Parlance

a particular way of speaking or using words, especially a way common to those with a particular job or interest

In gun industry parlance, however, the MCX is a “modern sporting rifle.”

16

Plutocracy

government by the wealthy

corporate greed and America's growing plutocracy

17

vituperative

containing or characterized by verbal abuse

the type of provocative magazine article that is guaranteed to engender vituperative threats of subscription cancellations

18

Renege

to go back on a promise or commitment

They had promised to pay her tuition but later reneged

19

Piquant

Having a pleasantly sharp taste or appetizing flavour

The duck was very pleasant and the sauce piquant, as orange sauces should be.

20

Ignoramus

an ignorant or stupid person

assume that your examiner is an ignoramus and explain everything to him

21

Mangle

destroy or severely damage by tearing or crushing

the car was mangled almost beyond recognition

22

Join the fray

to join the fight or argument

After listening to the argument, Mary decided to jump into the fray. Tom joined the fray and immediately got knocked down.

23

Bigamy

the offence of marrying someone while already married to another person

Her bigamy may have been innocent, or at least, an unavoidable accident

24

Emendation

the process of making a revision or correction to a text

here are some suggested emendations

25

wont

one's customary behaviour

Constance, as was her wont, had paid her little attention

26

mirage

an unrealistic hope or wish that cannot be achieved. something illusory, without substance or reality.

A peaceful solution proved to be a mirage.

27

caddish

dishonorable; ungentlemanly:

How could a fellow, a manly, decent fellow like you, think up such a caddish trick?

28

quell

suppress (a feeling).

he managed to quell his initial misgivings

29

polyglot

a person who knows and is able to use several languages

Slovenians, being surrounded by many countries, are mostly polyglots

30

Prolixity

extended to great, unnecessary, or tedious length; long and wordy.

The speech was unnecessarily prolix.

31

Prehensile

capable of grasping

many monkeys have long, prehensile tails which they use in swinging through the trees

32

apologia

a formal written defence of one's opinions or conduct

the finest apologia or explanation of what drives a man to devote his life to pure mathematics

33

Supererogatory supererogation

greater than that required or needed; superfluous.

now that the dress code has been e-mailed to everyone and posted on our intranet site, a paper memo about it seems supererogatory

34

Misspent

spend (one's time or money) foolishly, wrongly, or wastefully

perhaps I am atoning for my misspent youth

35

Avocation

a hobby or minor occupation.

My favorite avocation is reading.

36

Morass

a complicated or confused situation

she would become lost in a morass of lies and explanations

37

vainglorious

excessively proud of oneself or one's achievements; overly vain

this vainglorious boast of personal infallibility

38

cavalier

showing a lack of proper concern; offhand

Anne was irritated by his cavalier attitude

39

bucolic

relating to the pleasant aspects of the countryside and country life.

the church is lovely for its bucolic setting

40

Armada

a fleet of warships

an armada of forty-five warships

41

Discursive

digressing from subject to subject

the speaker's discursive style made it difficult to understand his point

42

pique

a feeling of irritation or resentment resulting from a slight, especially to one's pride

he left in a fit of pique

43

polygraph

a machine designed to detect and record changes in physiological characteristics, such as a person's pulse and breathing rates, used especially as a lie detector

if he passed the polygraph, of course, it would authenticate his story

44

emeritus

having retired but allowed to retain their title as an honour

emeritus professor of microbiology

45

irrefragable

not able to be refuted or disproved; indisputable

That evolution is a fact is as irrefragable as the assertion that Earth is round.

46

Soiree

an evening party or gathering, typically in a private house, for conversation or music

After the interview she took me to a coffee-and-cake soiree at a wealthy student's house

47

supernumerary

exceeding the usual, stated, or prescribed number

a third, supernumerary witness to the signing of the will

48

humbug

deceptive or false talk or behaviour

I can see in their teachings nothing but humbug, untainted by any trace of truth

49

hare-brained

foolish

a harebrained idea to go for a hike in an area where grizzly bear attacks had recently been reported

50

idiot savant

a person who has a mental disability or learning difficulties but is extremely gifted in a particular way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation.

You are a freaking savant when it comes to that

51

sobriquet

a person's nickname

tagged her with the sobriquet “peanut” because of her diminutive size

52

Chafe

to feel irritation, discontent, or impatience

he was chafing at her suggestion that he stay at home while she went on a vacation

53

Desperado

a desperate or reckless person, especially a criminal.

the notorious desperados of the Wild West

54

wallow

To wallow is to roll about in something, as a pig wallows in mud or a billionaire wallows in money.

Wallowing in a morass of self pity

55

proximate

(especially of the cause of something) closest in relationship; immediate

the fact that a storm may show up the poor condition of a flat roof does not signify that storm was the proximate cause of damage to it

56

patrimony

property inherited from one's father or male ancestor.

her patrimony was the family's newspaper business

57

Ethnocide 

The deliberate and systematic destruction of the culture of an ethnic group.

58

haughty

arrogantly superior and disdainful

They have to rebut his lies, and they have to do it without sounding bitter or afraid or superior or haughty

59

landlubber

a person unfamiliar with the sea or sailing.

60

arbiter

a person or agency whose judgment or opinion is considered authoritative arbiters of taste

Facebook should not be "arbiter of truth" in fake news fight

61

rest on one's laurels

to stop trying because one is satisfied with one's past achievements

Despite our success, this is no time to rest on our laurels. We rested on our laurels too long.

62

nolens volens

Whether a person wants or likes something or not.

a defendant who has intercourse nolens volens will be liable for rape

63

rebuke

express sharp disapproval or criticism of (someone) because of their behaviour or actions

she had rebuked him for drinking too much

64

instantiate

to represent (an abstraction) by a concrete instance

his imposing mansion is intended to instantiate for visitors his staggering success as an entrepreneur

65

burnish

polish (something, especially metal) by rubbing

highly burnished armour

66

valleity

a wish or inclination not strong enough to lead to action

the notion intrigued me, but remained a velleity

67

idolatry

the worship of a physical object as a god

The first of the biblical Ten Commandments prohibits idolatry: “You shall have no other gods before me

68

pablum

worthless, empty ideas.

We reward them with the same mindlessness they serve to us, a daily exchange of pablum.

69

Espial

the action of watching or catching sight of something or someone

She did not intend an espial upon Anthony;

70

meagre

lacking in quantity or quality

they were forced to supplement their meagre earnings

71

faustian bargain

An agreement, bargain, or deal in which a person sacrifices or abandons his or her moral, ethical, or spiritual values in favor of wealth, power, or other benefits.

I fear we might have devised something of a Faustian bargain for ourselves with our overdependence on technology, having traded in every speck of our private lives for flashy gadgets and convenience.

72

raptorial

predatory

raptorial bird

73

fecundity

the ability to produce an abundance of offspring or new growth; fertility

age-related decline in female fecundity

74

conjugal

relating to marriage or the relationship between a married couple.

conjugal loyalty

75

pallid

(of a person's face) pale, typically because of poor health

his face, with its wrinkled, pallid complexion

76

macerate

(especially with reference to food) soften or become softened by soaking in a liquid

macerate the mustard seeds in vinegar

77

Mired

involve someone or something in a difficult situation

since his fall from grace he had been mired in lawsuits

78

Ennui

boredom

79

fetid

smelling extremely unpleasant

the fetid water of the marsh

80

Fray

a situation of intense competitive activity. A battle or fight

he charged into the thick of the fray and went down fighting

81

Fabulation Fabulate

to tell invented stories

The concept of "sustainable city" is a metaphysical ideal, a utopian fabulation.

82

Valour

great courage in the face of danger, especially in battle

the medals are awarded for acts of valour

83

Subaltern

lower in rank; subordinate

84

Sybarite sybaritic

a person who is self-indulgent in their fondness for sensuous luxury

We see him dwelling in a sybarite's dream world of constant sex but, clearly, not having a great time.

85

Avuncular

Kind and friendly towards a younger or less experienced person.

he was avuncular, reassuring, and trustworthy

86

Frenetic

fast and energetic in a rather wild and uncontrolled way

87

Supranational

having power or influence that transcends national boundaries or governments

Islam is supranational in its operation

88

Recapitulate

summarize and state again the main points of.

89

progenitor

an ancestor or parent

his children were the progenitors of many of Scotland's noble families

90

Mortuary

relating to burial or tombs

mortuary rituals

91

Ecumenical

worldwide or general in extent, influence, or application

You might refer to a wide assortment of ethnic foods served together as being ecumenical

92

Defenestrate

remove or dismiss (someone) from a position of power or authority
throw (someone) out of a window

the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election

93

Palaeolithic 

relating to the period when humans used tools and weapons made of stone:

The Palaeolithic Period is sometimes called the Old Stone Age

94

Infelicitous

unfortunate; inappropriate.

It would be infelicitous to complain about the broken air conditioning in your Mercedes while volunteering at a homeless shelter. In other words, it would be dreadfully inappropriate.

95

Entrails

a person's or animal's intestines or internal organs, especially when removed or exposed

a priest would find omens in the steaming entrails of a sacrificed animal

96

Innards

entrails

97

Farinaceous foods

consisting of or containing starch

98

Rueful

expressing sorrow or regret, especially in a wry or humorous way

99

Calamitous

involving calamity; catastrophic or disastrous

100

Disabuse

persuade (someone) that an idea or belief is mistaken

Let me disabuse you of your foolish notions about married

101

Menial 

(of work) not requiring much skill and lacking prestige.

menial factory jobs

102

locomotion

movement or the ability to move from one place to another

the muscles that are concerned with locomotion

103

Logjam

a situation that seems irresolvable

the president can use his power to break the logjam over this issue

104

Tenuous

very weak or slight

a tenuous argument

105

Accost

approach and address (someone) boldly or aggressively

reporters accosted him in the street

106

Sequestered

(of a place) isolated and hidden away.

a wild sequestered spot

107

Misnomer

a wrong or inaccurate name or designation.

"International Airport” is something of a misnomer, since almost all the arriving and departing flights are local.

108

Garish

obtrusively bright and showy; lurid.

garish shirts in all sorts of colours

109

Slacktivism

actions performed via the Internet in support of a political or social cause but regarded as requiring little time or involvement, e.g. signing an online petition or joining a campaign group on a social media website or application.


110

Finicky

(of a person) fussy about their needs or requirements

a finicky eater

111

Metronomic

Mechanically or unvaryingly regular in rhythm

112

Beleaguered

put in a very difficult situation

the board is supporting the beleaguered director

113

Svengali figure

a person who manipulates or exerts excessive control over another

114

Ipso facto

by that very fact or act.

the enemy of one's enemy may be ipso facto a friend

115

Gambit

an act or remark that is calculated to gain an advantage, especially at the outset of a situation

his resignation was a tactical gambit

116

Vitiate

spoil or impair the quality or efficiency of.

development programmes have been vitiated by the rise in population

117

Parlous

full of danger or uncertainty; precarious

the parlous state of the economy

118

Synecdoche

a figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole or vice versa, as in England lost by six wickets (meaning ‘ the English cricket team’).

119

Penury penurious

the state of being very poor; extreme poverty

a penurious old tramp

120

rapprochement

an establishment or resumption of harmonious relations

The administration of new president Moon Jae-in, a left-leaning politician who favors rapprochement with North Korea, suspended the deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense systems (THAAD)

121

Torpor torpidity Torpid

a state of physical or mental inactivity; lethargy.

a torpid sloth that refused to budge off its tree branch

122

Bilious

spiteful; bad-tempered

his bilious temperament

123

Hawkish

advocating an aggressive or warlike policy, especially in foreign affairs

administration's hawkish stance"

124

Irreverent

showing a lack of respect for people or things that are generally taken seriously.

she is irreverent about the whole business of politics

125

repertoire

a stock of skills or types of behaviour that a person habitually uses

126

Deportment 

the way a person stands and walks, particularly as an element of etiquette

His stiff deportment matched his strict demeanor

127

Clemency

mercy; lenience.

128

Imbue

inspire or permeate with (a feeling or quality)

his works are invariably imbued with a sense of calm and serenity

129

Wastrel

a wasteful or good-for-nothing person.

130

Imprimatur 

sanction, approval

could not begin the project without the boss's imprimatur

131

Epicurean

fond of or adapted to luxury or indulgence in sensual pleasures; having luxurious tastes or habits, especially in eating and drinking.

devoted to sensual pleasures, esp food and drink; hedonistic

132

Morganatic

relating to or denoting a marriage in which neither the spouse of lower rank, nor any children, have any claim to the possessions or title of the spouse of higher rank.


he contracted a morganatic marriage with a German-born actress

133

Jugular

of the neck or throat

134

Flummoxed

bewildered or perplexed

he became flummoxed and speechless

135

Jingoism

extreme patriotism, especially in the form of aggressive or warlike foreign policy

the popular jingoism that swept the lower–middle classes

136

Plaudit

praise

the network has received plaudits for its sports coverage

137

Expunged

obliterate or remove completely (something unwanted or unpleasant)

the kind of man that could expunge an unsatisfactory incident from his memory

138

Regale

entertain or amuse (someone) with talk.

he regaled her with a colourful account of that afternoon's meeting

139

Thespian

relating to drama and the theatre.
"thespian talents"

140

Psychosomatic

(of a physical illness or other condition) caused or aggravated by a mental factor such as internal conflict or stress.
"her doctor was convinced that most of Edith's problems were psychosomatic"

141

Tempestuous

very stormy.
"a tempestuous wind"

142

Firebrand

a person who is very passionate about a particular cause.

And then there were the perpetual allegations against the far-right firebrand Marine Le Pen, Macron’s principal rival in the final round of the election.

143

Epicaricacy

Rejoicing at or deriving pleasure from the misfortunes of others.

144

Lecherous

having or showing excessive or offensive sexual desire

she ignored his lecherous gaze

145

Heathen

(in historical contexts) an individual of a people that do not acknowledge the God of the Bible; a person who is neither a Jew, Christian, nor Muslim; a pagan.

146

Lowbrow

a person who is uninterested, uninvolved, or uneducated in intellectual activities or pursuits.

Will the next few hours be both didactic and entertaining, providing us with ample high and lowbrow cocktail party fodder?

147

Behoove

to be necessary, proper, or advantageous for

it behooves us to go

148

Polymorphous

having, assuming, or occurring in various forms, characters, or styles

intelligence is a polymorphous concept

149

Rejoinder

a reply, especially a sharp or witty one.

she would have made some cutting rejoinder but none came to mind

150

Ineffaceable 

unable to be erased or forgotten

the experience made an ineffaceable impression on his mind

151

Narcoleptic

a condition characterized by frequent and uncontrollable periods of deep sleep.

a narcoleptic bus driver could be dangerous

152

Deadpan

impassive or expressionless

she delivered her monologue in a deadpan voice

153

Semper fidelis

"always faithful" or "always loyal"

154

Dowdy

unfashionable and unstylish in appearance (typically used of a woman)

"she could achieve the kind of casual chic which made every other woman around her look dowdy"

155

Frumpy

(of a woman or her clothes) dowdy and old-fashioned.

"a frumpy housewife"

156

Simulacrum

an image or representation of someone or something

a small-scale simulacrum of a skyscraper

157

nihilistic

rejecting all religious and moral principles in the belief that life is meaningless.

an embittered, nihilistic teenager

158

Bastion

a thing or person regarded as upholding or defending an attitude, principle, etc: the last bastion of opposition.

159

Dunce

a person who is slow at learning; a stupid person.
"he was baffled by arithmetic and they called him a dunce at school"

160

Mewling

(especially of a baby) cry feebly or querulously; whimper.
dozens of mewling babies"

161

Nouveau

newly arrived or developed

the sudden success of the film Wonder Woman created a nouveau heroine 

162

Stonewalling

delay or obstruct (a request, process, or person) by refusing to answer questions or by being evasive.
"she has also stonewalled queries about her love life"

163

carcinogen

a substance capable of causing cancer in living tissue.

164

Beyond the pale

outside the bounds of acceptable behaviour.
"the language my father used was beyond the pale"

165

Foment

instigate or stir up (an undesirable or violent sentiment or course of action).
"they accused him of fomenting political unrest"

166

Lickspittle

a person who behaves obsequiously to those in power.
"he is a lickspittle for the Establishment"

167

Natter

talk casually, especially on unimportant matters; chat.
"they nattered away for hours"

168

Stowaway

a person who stows away on a passenger vehicle.

169

Rabid

having or proceeding from an extreme or fanatical support of or belief in something.
"the show's small but rabid fan base"

170

Amour propre

a sense of one's own worth; self-respect.
"Pablo's amour propre must have been tested by his short stature"

171

Agog

very eager or curious to hear or see something.
"I'm all agog"

172

Galling

causing annoyance or resentment; annoying.
"it would be galling to lose your job because of a dispute with a customer"

173

Misotheism

a hatred of gods or God.

Misotheism is a rather foolish term for an atheist as you can't hate something or someone that doesn't exist.

174

Precept

a general rule intended to regulate behaviour or thought.
"the legal precept of being innocent until proven guilty"

175

Unabbreviable

That cannot be abbreviated.

176

Provincialism 

Provincialism is an unsophisticated, small-town way of life. City dwellers commonly accuse those who live in the country of narrow-minded provincialism.

177

Expatriate

send (a person or money) abroad.
"we expatriated the prisoners of war immediately after the end of the war"

178

Terra firma

dry land; the ground as distinct from the sea or air.
"they needed to rest themselves on terra firma"

179

Dispensation

exemption from a rule or usual requirement.
"although she was too young, she was given special dispensation to play before her birthday"

180

Depraved

morally corrupt; wicked.
"he was a depraved lecher"

181

Crapulous 

given to or characterized by gross excess in drinking or eating. suffering from or due to such excess.

I feel absolutely crapulous this morning

182

Intemperance

lack of moderation or restraint.

I'm given to intemperance when it comes to alcohol

183

Indigent

poor; needy.
"a charity for the relief of indigent artists"

184

Donnish

resembling a college don, particularly because of having a pedantic, scholarly manner

185

Hornet's nest

a very difficult or unpleasant situation, especially in which a lot of people get very angry and complain:

His remarks about the lack of good women tennis players stirred up a (real) hornet's nest.

186

Manumission

is the act of a slave owner freeing his or her slaves

though he was an ouspoken defender of liberty, this son of Virginia did not amnumit his own slaves until he was on his deathbed.

187

Impermeable

not allowing fluid to pass through.

the offer of impermeable faith that can't give way is an offer of something not worth having

188

Modish

conforming to or following what is currently popular and fashionable.
"it seems sad that such a scholar should feel compelled to use this modish jargon"

189

Gloat over

dwell on one's own success or another's misfortune with smugness or malignant pleasure.
"his enemies gloated over his death"

190

Swindle

use deception to deprive (someone) of money or possessions.
"a businessman swindled investors out of millions of pounds"

191

Livid

furiously angry.
"he was livid that Garry had escaped"

192

Lex talionis

the law of retaliation, whereby a punishment resembles the offence committed in kind and degree.
"the lex talionis of feud violence and blood money"

193

Abattoir

a slaughterhouse.

194

Threadbare


meager, scanty, or poor:
a threadbare emotional life.

hackneyed; trite; ineffectively stale:
threadbare arguments. a pathetically threadbare justification for wrongdoing

195

Sadism

the tendency to derive pleasure, especially sexual gratification, from inflicting pain, suffering, or humiliation on others.
"beneath the apparent loving concern she had glimpsed spite and sadism"

196

Glean

obtain (information) from various sources, often with difficulty.
"the information is gleaned from press cuttings"

197

Baleful

threatening harm; menacing.
"Bill shot a baleful glance in her direction"

198

Lenity

the quality of being kind or gentle.
"a smile crossed her face, but this unexpected lenity was short-lived"

199

Unsullied

not spoiled or made impure.
"an unsullied reputation"

200

Newfangled

different from what one is used to; objectionably new.
"I've no time for such newfangled nonsense"

201

Dunning-Kruger effect

occurs where people fail to adequately assess their level of competence — or specifically, their incompetence — at a task and thus consider themselves much more competent than everyone else.

Trump's disability is Dunning-Kruger effect. 

202

Finitude

the state of having limits or bounds.
"one quickly senses the finitude of his patience"

203

Dim witted

stupid or silly.
"a dim-witted waiter"

204

Grifter

A grifter is a con artist: someone who swindles people out of money through fraud.

205

Forestall

prevent or obstruct (an anticipated event or action) by taking advance action.
"they will present their resignations to forestall a vote of no confidence"

206

Pedestrian

not interesting; showing very little imagination:

Her books, with few exceptions, are workmanlike but pedestrian.

207

Larceny

theft of personal property.

208

Mellow

(of a person's character) tempered by maturity or experience.
"a more mellow personality"

209

Stoush

a brawl or other fight.

the prospect of the game deteriorating into a stoush always kept me hooked

210

Straitened

characterized by poverty.
"they lived in straitened circumstances"

211

hoodwink

deceive or trick
staff were hoodwinked into thinking the cucumber was a sawn-off shotgun

212

Overbearing

unpleasantly overpowering.
"an overbearing, ill-tempered brute"

213

Bombastic

high-sounding but with little meaning; inflated.
"bombastic rhetoric"

214

Capacious

having a lot of space inside; roomy.
"she rummaged in her capacious handbag"

215

Cavernous

giving the impression of vast, dark depths.
"his cavernous eyes"

216

Besmirch

damage (someone's reputation).
"he had besmirched the good name of his family"

217

Sabotage

deliberately destroy, damage, or obstruct (something), especially for political or military advantage.
"power lines from South Africa were sabotaged by rebel forces"

218

Vertiginous

extremely high or steep.
"vertiginous drops to the valleys below"

219

sublimate

: to divert the expression of (an instinctual desire or impulse) from its unacceptable form to one that is considered more socially or culturally acceptable

I sublimated my grief at the death of my mother by throwing myself into my work.

220

Paraphernalia

miscellaneous articles, especially the equipment needed for a particular activity.
"drills, saws, and other paraphernalia necessary for home improvements"

221

Glib

(of words or a speaker) fluent but insincere and shallow.
"the glib phrases soon roll off the tongue"
Andrew is a glib talker; glib answers.

222

Humdrum

lacking excitement or variety; boringly monotonous.
"humdrum routine work"

223

Phenotypic

relating to the observable characteristics of an individual resulting from the interaction of its genotype with the environment.
"breeding animals were selected for phenotypic traits such as size"

224

Foundered

to become wrecked; fail utterly:
The project foundered because public support was lacking.

225

vacuity

lack of thought or intelligence; empty-headedness.
"he denounced what he considered the frivolity or vacuity of much contemporary painting"

226

Uproarious

characterized by or provoking loud noise or uproar.
"an uproarious party"

227

Deflagration

the action of heating a substance until it burns away rapidly.

228

Lopsided

with one side lower or smaller than the other.
"a lopsided grin"

229

Redouble

make or become much greater, more intense, or more numerous.
"we will redouble our efforts to reform agricultural policy"

230

On tenterhooks

In a state of uncomfortable suspense.

he was on tenterhooks waiting for the director's decision

231

Genealogical

relating to the study or tracing of lines of family descent.
"genealogical research"

232

Postprandial

during or relating to the period after dinner or lunch.
"we were jolted from our postprandial torpor"

233

Prissy

fussily and excessively respectable.
"a middle-class family with two prissy children"

234

Turgid

(of language or style) tediously pompous or bombastic.
"some turgid verses on the death of Prince Albert"

235

Accoutrements

an additional item of dress or equipment

236

Gadfly

A gadfly is a person who interferes with the status quo of a society or community by posing novel, potently upsetting questions, usually directed at authorities.

always a gadfly, he attacked intellectual orthodoxies

237

Conspectus

a summary or overview of a subject.
"new recordings containing five of his works give a rich conspectus of his art"

238

Highbrow

a person who possesses or has pretensions to superior learning or culture

Highbrow critics sniff that the programme was 'too sophisticated' to appeal to most viewers

239

Lodestar

a star that is used to guide the course of a ship, especially the pole star.
"she dominated his existence as chief muse and intellectual lodestar"

240

Epiphenomenon

a secondary effect or by-product,

could consciousness be an epiphenomenon of the brain?

241

Disjunctive

Lacking connection or consistency.
‘the novel's disjunctive detail’

242

Sacerdotal

relating to priests or the priesthood; priestly.

243

Adobe

a kind of clay used as a building material.
"adobe houses"

244

Allusive

using or containing suggestion rather than explicit mention.
"allusive references to the body"

245

Asymptotic

coming into consideration as a variable approaches a limit, usually infinity:
asymptotic property; asymptotic behavior.

246

Unslakable

not able to be quenched or satisfied.
"her unslakeable desire"

247

Metanoia

change in one's way of life resulting from penitence or spiritual conversion.
"what he demanded of people was metanoia, repentance, a complete change of heart"

248

Exequy

funeral rites.
"he attended the exequies for the Pope"

249

Delineate

describe or portray (something) precisely.
"the law should delineate and prohibit behaviour which is socially abhorrent"

250

Mortification

great embarrassment and shame.
"they mistook my mortification for an admission of guilt"

251

Dauntless

showing fearlessness and determination.
"dauntless bravery"

252

erotomania

excessive sexual desire

253

Nabob

a person of conspicuous wealth or high status.

254

Watershed

an event or period marking a turning point in a situation.
"these works were a watershed in the history of music"

255

Farrago 

a confused mixture.
"a farrago of fact and myth about Abraham Lincoln"

256

Stentorian

(of a person's voice) loud and powerful.
"a stentorian roar"

257

Rancor 

bitterness or resentfulness, especially when long standing.
"he spoke without rancour"

258

Saturation point

the stage beyond which no more of something can be absorbed or accepted.
"the market quickly reached saturation point"

259

Blinkered

having or showing a narrow or limited outlook.
"a blinkered attitude"

260

Nook and cranny

Everywhere, as in I've searched for it in every nook and cranny, and I still can't find it.

261

Adumbrate

foreshadow (a future event).
"tenors solemnly adumbrate the fate of the convicted sinner"

262

Jejune

naive, simplistic, and superficial

their entirely predictable and usually jejune opinions

263

Spruiker

someone who tries to persuade people to buy something, use a service, etc often in a dishonest or exaggerated way

The recent steady rise in property prices has heralded the return of the property spruiker.

264

Withering

intended to make someone feel humiliated; scornful.
"a withering look"

265

Germane

relevant to a subject under consideration.
"that is not germane to our theme"

266

Preening

congratulate or pride oneself.
"he's busy preening himself on acquiring such a pretty girlfriend"

267

Lapidary expression

characterized by an exactitude and extreme refinement that suggests gem cutting: a lapidary style; lapidary verse.

268

Redoubtable

(of a person) formidable, especially as an opponent.
"he was a redoubtable debater"

269

Skittish

nervous or excitable; easily scared.
"a skittish chestnut mare"

270

Disentrall

to free from bondage : liberate

we must disenthrall ourselves from time-honored ways of doing things, or we will never progress as a society

271

Fig leaf

something that hides something else, especially something that is dishonest or embarrassing:

The spokesperson said the information campaign was a fig leaf to hide the most regressive tax in history.

272

Mollycoddle

treat (someone) in an indulgent or overprotective way.


I found school very difficult, and realized I'd been mollycoddled at home

273

Coddle

to treat tenderly; nurse or tend indulgently; pamper:

to coddle children when they're sick.

274

Trenchant

vigorous or incisive in expression or style.

"the White Paper makes trenchant criticisms of health authorities"

275

Phallic 

relating to or resembling a phallus or erect penis.
"a phallic symbol"

276

Nostrums

a medicine prepared by an unqualified person, especially one that is not considered effective.
"a charlatan who sells nostrums"

277

Jibe

to be in accord : agree —usually used with with a story that doesn't jibe with the facts

278

Censure 

express severe disapproval of (someone or something), especially in a formal statement.
"the company was heavily censured by inspectors from the Department of Trade"

279

Groundswell

a rapid spontaneous growth (as of political opinion)

a groundswell of support

280

Musty

having a stale, mouldy, or damp smell.
"a dark musty library"

281

Dyke

a lesbian.

282

Canoodling

kiss and cuddle amorously.
"she was caught canoodling with her boyfriend"

283

Soporific

tending to induce drowsiness or sleep.
"the motion of the train had a somewhat soporific effect"

284

Ad libitum

at one's pleasure.

whereas drugs such as tobacco and alcohol, which have ruined countless lives, are enjoyed ad libitum in almost every society on earth.

285

Malarkey

meaningless talk; nonsense.
"don't give me that malarkey"

286

Trifling

unimportant or trivial.
"a trifling sum"

287

Depilation

to remove the hair from (hides, skin, etc.).

you may or may not be delighted to learn that I've been offered a free "Back, Sack and Crack" depilation session by a fancy salon

288

Snarky

snide and sharply critical.
"snarky remarks"

289

Mumpsimus

a traditional custom or idea adhered to although shown to be unreasonable.

he still holds to the old mumpsimus that a woman's place is in the kitchen

290

Curry favour

Ingratiate oneself with someone through obsequious behaviour.
‘a wimpish attempt to curry favour with the new bosses’

291

Perambulator

Pram

292

Heart rending

causing great sadness or distress.
"a heart-rending story"

293

Tryst

an appointment to meet at a certain time and place, especially one made somewhat secretly by lovers.

both lovers had to hurry to keep their noontime tryst in the park

294

Tabula rasa

a mind not yet affected by experiences, impressions, etc.

a child's mind is a tabula rasa

295

Hand wringing

the excessive display of concern or distress.
"this is no time for more hand-wringing about bias in the media"

296

Luciferous

bringing light or insight : illuminating a luciferous performance of the opera

297

Perineum 

the area between the anus and the scrotum or vulva.

298

Neophyte

a person who is new to a subject or activity.
"four-day cooking classes are offered to neophytes and experts"

299

Obstrusive

forward in manner or conduct obtrusive behavior The waiter was attentive without being obtrusive.

300

Ruse

An action intended to deceive someone; a trick.
‘Emma tried to think of a ruse to get Paul out of the house’

301

Etched

to fix permanently in or implant firmly on the mind; root in the memory:
Our last conversation is etched in my memory.

302

Inenarrable

incapable of being narrated : indescribable

the filmmaker's decision to depict the essentially inenarrable phenomenon called love by means of a series of lush metaphors

303

Disquiet

make (someone) worried or uneasy.
"she felt disquieted at the lack of interest the girl had shown"

304

Redress

remedy or set right (an undesirable or unfair situation).
"the question is how to redress the consequences of racist land policies"

305

Palpably

noticeably or clearly.
"palpably false claims"

306

Roister

enjoy oneself or celebrate in a noisy or boisterous way.
"workers from the refinery roistered in the bars"

307

Splenetic

bad-tempered; spiteful.
"a splenetic rant"

308

Spinmeister

a person (such as a political aide) responsible for ensuring that others interpret an event from a particular point of view

it is, according to spinmeister Kellyanne Conway, "alternative facts"

309

Carouse

drink alcohol and enjoy oneself with others in a noisy, lively way.
"they danced and caroused until the drink ran out"

310

Scapegrace

a mischievous or wayward person, especially a young person or child; a rascal.

311

Evince

reveal the presence of (a quality or feeling); indicate.
"the news stories evinced the usual mixture of sympathy and satisfaction"

312

Portmanteau

a word blending the sounds and combining the meanings of two others, for example motel or brunch.
"podcast is a portmanteau, a made-up word coined from a combination of the words iPod and broadcast"

313

Gaffe

an unintentional act or remark causing embarrassment to its originator; a blunder.

"in my first few months at work I made some real gaffes"

314

Chasm

a profound difference between people, viewpoints, feelings, etc.
"the chasm between rich and poor"

315

Subsume

include or absorb (something) in something else.
"most of these phenomena can be subsumed under two broad categories"

316

Poignant

evoking a keen sense of sadness or regret.
"a poignant reminder of the passing of time"

317

Behest

an authoritative order : command The meeting was called at the senator's behest.

318

Fillip to

something which acts as a stimulus or boost to an activity.

"the halving of car tax would provide a fillip to sales"

319

Chloroformed

make (someone) unconscious .

Mark Twain's imperishable remark that the Mormon Bible is chloroform in print

320

Urbane

(of a person, especially a man) courteous and refined in manner.
"he is charming and urbane"

321

To cut somebody some slack

to allow someone to do something that is not usually allowed, or to treat someone less severely than is usual

"Andrew's late again."
"Cut him some slack - his wife just had a baby."

322

To the hilt

completely.
"the estate was mortgaged up to the hilt"

323

Echelon

a level or rank in an organization, a profession, or society.
"the upper echelons of the business world"

324

Teetotal

choosing or characterized by abstinence from alcohol.
"a teetotal lifestyle"

325

Unadorned

not adorned; plain.
"it was very simple, its walls unadorned"

326

Priggish

self-righteously moralistic and superior.
"a priggish little pedant"

327

Annus horribilis

a year of disaster or misfortune.

328

Callow

(of a young person) inexperienced and immature.
"earnest and callow undergraduates"

329

Browbeat

intimidate (someone), typically into doing something, with stern or abusive words.
"a witness is being browbeaten under cross-examination"

330

Boosterism

the keen promotion of a person, organization, or cause.
"it would be easy to dismiss such hyperbole as blatant boosterism"

331

Oaf

a man who is rough or clumsy and unintelligent.
"they are just big, clumsy oafs"

332

Purvey

spread or promote (an idea, view, etc.).
"the majority of newspapers purvey a range of right-wing attitudes"

333

Verve

vigour and spirit or enthusiasm.

"Kollo sings with supreme verve and flexibility"

334

Upend

set or turn (something) on its end or upside down.
"she upended a can of soup over the portions"

335

Slapdash

done too hurriedly and carelessly.
"he gave a slapdash performance"

336

Yokel

an uneducated and unsophisticated person from the countryside.

337

Panache

a grand or flamboyant manner; verve; style; flair:
The actor who would play Cyrano must have panache.

338

Bring to bear

to concentrate on with a specific purpose:

pressure should be brought to bear on the illegal regime and support given to the resistance.

339

Consilience

agreement between the approaches to a topic of different academic subjects, especially science and the humanities.

340

Kernel

the central or most important part of something.
"this is the kernel of the argument"

341

Rabble rousing

an instance or the practice of stirring up the passions or prejudices of the public.

342

Swashbuckling

engage in daring and romantic adventures with bravado or flamboyance.
"a crew of swashbuckling buccaneers"

343

Dapper

(of a man) neat and trim in dress and appearance.
"he looked very dapper in a dark silk suit"

344

Mea culpa

a formal acknowledgment of personal fault or error

345

Overwrought

in a state of nervous excitement or anxiety.
"she was too overwrought to listen to reason"

346

Transubstantiation

the conversion of the substance of the Eucharistic elements into the body and blood of Christ at consecration, only the appearances of bread and wine still remaining.

347

Concatenation

a series of interconnected things.
"a concatenation of events which had finally led to the murder"

348

Penumbra

something that covers, surrounds, or obscures : shroud a penumbra of secrecy

a penumbra of somber dignity has descended over his reputation

349

Congeries

a disorderly collection; a jumble.
"a congeries of European states"

Classical atomists conceived the universe as nothing more than an eternal congeries of material particles of different shapes and sizes perpetually in motion and continually coalescing to form unstable natural bodies

350

Railroaded

rush or coerce (someone) into doing something.
"she hesitated, unwilling to be railroaded into a decision"

351

Benighted

in a state of pitiful or contemptible intellectual or moral ignorance.
"they saw themselves as bringers of culture to poor benighted peoples"

352

Louche

disreputable or sordid in a rakish or appealing way.

Trump's louche family portrait with golden carpet and ostentatious furniture

353

Retribution 

punishment inflicted on someone as vengeance for a wrong or criminal act.
"employees asked not to be named, saying they feared retribution"

354

Counterfactual

relating to or expressing what has not happened or is not the case.

psychologists call this awareness of what might have been counterfactual thinking.

355

Oblique

not expressed or done in a direct way.
"he issued an oblique attack on the President"

356

Effluvium

an unpleasant or harmful odour or discharge.
"smoke and effluvia from factory chimneys"

357

Balkanisation

to divide (a country, territory, etc.) into small, quarrelsome, ineffectual states.

358

Ethnocentrism

evaluation of other cultures according to preconceptions originating in the standards and customs of one's own culture.


don't let our history of racism, ethnocentrism and imperialism cast a blind spot on your moral scruples such that you don’t notice that some cultures do a terrible job of producing human lives worth living.

359

Enucleation

removal of the eye

360

Cognate

related; connected.
"cognate subjects such as physics and chemistry"

A C Grayling believes that heroin, cocaine, marijuana, ecstasy and cognates of these should be legal and available in exactly the same way as nicotine and alcohol.

361

Scarification

involves scratching, etching, burning / branding, or superficially cutting designs, pictures, or words into the skin as a permanent body modification.

362

Halitosis

technical term for bad breath.

363

Accede

agree to a demand, request, or treaty.
"the authorities did not accede to the strikers' demands"

364

Millennials 

a person reaching young adulthood in the early 21st century.
"the industry brims with theories on what makes millennials tick"

365

Millinery 

women's hats.
"her designer millinery"

366

Antsy

agitated, impatient, or restless.
"Dick got antsy the day he put to sea"

367

Ornery

bad-tempered or difficult to deal with.
"an ornery old military man"

368

Ensnare

catch in or as in a trap.
"they were ensnared in city centre traffic"

369

Miscegenation

the interbreeding of people considered to be of different racial types.
"they believe in miscegenation as the answer to world peace"

370

Hoodlum

a person who engages in crime and violence; a hooligan or gangster.
"they were the ‘professional’ gangsters of New York, hoodlums and racketeers"

371

Nictate

blink.
"the lid of her left eye began to nictate"

372

Vulcanised

harden

373

Indurate

harden.
"a bed of indurated clay"

374

Chintzy

cheap and of poor quality.
"a chintzy amateur lens"

375

Bounteous

generously given or giving; bountiful.
"the earth yields a bounteous harvest"

376

Pantheon

a small group of people who are the most famous, important, and admired in their particular area of activity:
Don't you agree that Malcolm X definitely has a place in the pantheon of black civil rights heroes?

377

Cede

give up (power or territory).
"in 1874, the islands were ceded to Britain"

378

Bloviate

talk at length, especially in an inflated or empty way.

I fail to see how this bloviating billionaire is championing anyone by himself.

379

Graft

the acquisition of money, gain, or advantage by dishonest, unfair, or illegal means, especially through the abuse of one's position or influence in politics, business, etc.

all efforts of sweeping measures to curb official graft under Trump's presidency may be rendered futile

380

Consecrate

dedicated to a sacred purpose

Richard Dawkins live a life consecrated to science

381

Antinomian

a person who believes that Christians are released by grace from the obligation of observing the moral law.

your vacuous antinomian view is precisely what I find most revolting about Christianity

382

Hiatus

a break or interruption in the continuity of a work, series, action, etc.

there was a brief hiatus in the war with France

383

Impassible

incapable of suffering or feeling pain.
"belief in an impassible God"

years of living behind bars had rendered him impassible

384

Seminal

strongly influencing later developments.
"his seminal work on chaos theory"

385

circumscribe

restrict (something) within limits.
"the minister's powers are circumscribed both by tradition and the organization of local government"

386

Cultural amnesia

a partial or total loss of memory.
"they were suffering from amnesia"

387

Lumbering

moving in a slow, heavy, awkward way.
"Bob was a big, lumbering, gentle sort"

388

Hanker

feel a strong desire for or to do something.
"he hankered after a lost golden age"

389

Concupiscence

strong sexual desire; lust.
"St Anthony's battle with concupiscence"

390

Dotty

eccentric or slightly mad.
"a dotty old lady"

391

Flailing

wave or swing wildly.
"his arms flailed as he sought to maintain his balance"

392

Surfeit

cause (someone) to desire no more of something as a result of having consumed or done it to excess.

having surfeited ourselves on raw oysters, we had to decline the rest of restaurant's offerings

393

Tempest

a violent windy storm.
"a raging tempest"

394

Despoil

steal or violently remove valuable possessions from; plunder.
"the church was despoiled of its marble wall covering"

395

Panoply

an extensive or impressive collection.
"a deliciously inventive panoply of insults"

396

Vogue

the prevailing fashion or style at a particular time.
"the vogue is to make realistic films"

397

Titrate

continuously measure and adjust the balance of (a physiological function or drug dosage).

If we see somebody losing their balance, we would suggest backing off a little bit as a way of titrating the speed of the material that may be coming up. 

398

Aplomb

self-confidence or assurance, especially when in a demanding situation.
"Diana passed the test with aplomb"

399

Estimable

worthy of great respect.

we abandoned that long and estimable tradition this year for one reason: Donald J Trump

400

Mope

feel dejected and apathetic.
"no use moping—things could be worse"
There's no point in sitting at home and moping - get out there and find yourself another job!

401

Parley

a conference between opposing sides in a dispute, especially a discussion of terms for an armistice.
"a parley is in progress and the invaders may withdraw"

402

Unimpassioned 

having or showing no emotion or intensity.
"a flat, unimpassioned voice"

403


Infirmity

physical or mental weakness.
"old age and infirmity come to men and women alike"

404

Intromission

the action or process of inserting the penis into the vagina in sexual intercourse.

405

Untethered 

release or free from a tether.
"I reached the horses and untethered them"

406

Extremophile

a microorganism, especially an archaean, that lives in conditions of extreme temperature, acidity, alkalinity, or chemical concentration.

407

Regardant

looking backwards.

408

Equipoise

balance of forces or interests.
"this temporary equipoise of power"

409

Dirigible

capable of being steered, guided, or directed.
"a dirigible spotlight"

410

Gabby

excessively or annoyingly talkative.
"we scientists are an incurably gabby lot"

411

Amatory

relating to or induced by sexual love or desire.
"his amatory exploits"

412

Fink

an unpleasant or contemptible person

413

Sine nomine (abbreviated s.n.)

Anonymous

is a Latin expression, meaning "without a name". It is most commonly used in the contexts of publishing and bibliographical listings such as library catalogs, to signify that the publisher (or distributor, etc.) of a listed work is unknown, or not printed or specified on the work

414

Sexcapade

a sexual escapade; an illicit affair.
"the Star has exposed his sexcapades with various starlets"

415

Eon

an indefinitely long period of time; age.

416

Requite

make appropriate return for (a favour, service, or wrongdoing).
"they are quick to requite a kindness"

417

Beau

a male lover or sweetheart.

418

Coquettish

behaving in such a way as to suggest a playful sexual attraction; flirtatious.
"a coquettish grin"

419

Narcolepsy

a condition characterized by an extreme tendency to fall asleep whenever in relaxing surroundings.

420

Globus hystericus

the sensation of a lump in the throat, as a symptom of anxiety or hysteria.

421

Haecceity 

the property of being a unique and individual thing.
"he has a paramount concern with haecceity, the thisness of things"

422

Chasten

(of a reproof or misfortune) have a restraining or moderating effect on.
"the director was somewhat chastened by his recent flops"

423

Chronicity

State of being chronic.

What I would like to see more research on is the chronicity of these illnesses

424

Quiddity

a distinctive feature; a peculiarity.
"his quirks and quiddities"

425

Sashay

walk in an ostentatious yet casual manner, typically with exaggerated movements of the hips and shoulders.
"Louise was sashaying along in a long black satin dress"

426

Inveigle

persuade (someone) to do something by means of deception or flattery.
"he inveigled her back to his room"

427

Beau monde

fashionable society.
"London was the centre of this jet-hopping beau monde"

428

Brinkmanship

the art or practice of pursuing a dangerous policy to the limits of safety before stopping, especially in politics.
"in any game of brinkmanship, it is possible that one side will collapse suddenly"

429

Somnambulist 

sleepwalker

430

Legion

great in number.
"her fans are legion"

431

Esperance 

hope

432

Revanchism

a policy of seeking to retaliate, especially to recover lost territory.
"a recipe for deep future resentment, revanchism and renewed conflict"

433

Vie, vying

compete, contend

They are vying to win the championship for the third year in a row.

434

Balmy

characterized by pleasantly warm weather.
"the balmy days of late summer"

435

Entreat

ask someone earnestly or anxiously to do something.
"his friends entreated him not to go"

436

Neonatal

relating to newborn children (or other mammals).
"special attention is given to mortality in the neonatal period"

437

Laterigrade 

having a sideways manner of moving, as a crab.

438

Wallflower 

a shy or excluded person at a dance or party, especially a girl without a partner.
"I felt like a miserable wallflower at a boisterous party"

439

Gawk

to stare stupidly; gape:
The onlookers gawked at arriving celebrities.

440

Level headed

calm and sensible.
"she was glad to have the advice of someone so level-headed"

441

Misandry

dislike of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against men (i.e. the male sex).

442

Adjure

urge or request (someone) solemnly or earnestly to do something.
"I adjure you to tell me the truth"

443

Harried

feeling strained as a result of having demands persistently made on one; harassed.
"harried reporters are frequently forced to invent what they cannot find out"

444

Doyenne

the most respected or prominent woman in a particular field.
"she became a doyenne of the London Irish music scene"

445

Rookie

a new recruit, especially in the army or police.
"a rookie cop"

446

Pulpit

a raised enclosed platform in a church or chapel from which the preacher delivers a sermon.
"many ministers delivered political guidance from their pulpits"

447

Capstone

a stone fixed on top of something, typically a wall.
"our time might be merely the capstone to the age of humankind"

448

Bonanza

a situation which creates a sudden increase in wealth, good fortune, or profits.
"a natural gas bonanza for Britain"

449

Have work cut out for me

to have something very difficult to do:
She'll really have her work cut out to finish all those reports by the end of the week.

450

Patrician 

belonging to or characteristic of the aristocracy.
"a proud, patrician face"

451

Jettison

throw or drop (something) from an aircraft or ship.
"six aircraft jettisoned their loads in the sea"

452

Pygmy

Disparaging and Offensive. a small or dwarfish person.

453

Gripe

to complain naggingly or constantly; grumble.

my only gripe is the size of the font

454

Unflappable

having or showing calmness in a crisis.
"I prided myself on being unflappable even in the most chaotic circumstances"

455

Awry

away from the usual or expected course; amiss.
"many youthful romances go awry"

456

Rodomontade

boastful or inflated talk or behaviour.
"the corrupting effect the vogue for macho rodomontade may have even upon a civilized man"

457

Descant

talk tediously or at length.
"I have descanted on this subject before"

458

Myrmidon 

a follower or subordinate of a powerful person, typically one who is unscrupulous or carries out orders unquestioningly.
"one of Hitler's myrmidons"

459

Moratorium

a temporary prohibition of an activity.
"a moratorium on the use of drift nets"

460

Locution

a word or phrase, especially with regard to style or idiom.

461

Consigliere

a member of a Mafia family who serves as an adviser to the leader and resolves disputes within the family.

462

Flackery

publicity and promotion; press-agentry.

In short, keep it a newsletter and not thinly disguised flackery.

463

In Flagrante Delicto

in the very act of wrongdoing, especially in an act of sexual misconduct.
"he had been caught in flagrante with the wife of the Association's Treasurer"

464

Hamartia

a fatal flaw

If Islam comes up anyway, do draw false equivalencies and hobble yourselves, citing Western imperialism as a moral hamartia disqualifying you from taking critical stances about the faith of a beleaguered minority.

465

Burgeoning

begin to grow or increase rapidly; flourish.
"manufacturers are keen to cash in on the burgeoning demand"

466

Vagrant

a person without a settled home or regular work who wanders from place to place and lives by begging.

vagrants sleeping in cardboard boxes on the sidewalk

467

Nettlesome

causing annoyance or difficulty.
"nettlesome regional disputes"

468

Self effacing

not claiming attention for oneself; retiring and modest.
"his demeanour was self-effacing, gracious, and polite"

469

Lithe

(especially of a person's body) thin, supple, and graceful.
"she lay gazing up at his tall, lithe figure"

470

Cadence

rhythm -
Oars moved back and forth in smooth cadence

471

Scuttlebutt

rumour; gossip.
"the scuttlebutt had it that he was a government spy"

472

Repartee 

conversation or speech characterized by quick, witty comments or replies.
"he had a quick mind and a splendid gift of repartee"

473

Ribald

referring to sexual matters in an amusingly rude or irreverent way.
"a ribald comment"

474

Solar plexus

the pit of the stomach; specifically : the part of the abdomen including the stomach that is particularly vulnerable to the effects of a blow to the body wall in front of it

475

Spiel 

an elaborate or glib speech or story, typically one used by a salesperson.
"he delivers a breathless and effortless spiel in promotion of his new novel"

476

Nickel and dime

Put a financial strain on (someone) by charging small amounts for many minor services.
‘we don't nickel-and-dime our customers like some vendors that charge extra for every little utility’

477

Bridle

Curb, restrain
set a bridle on his power

478

Emir

a title of various Muslim (mainly Arab) rulers.
"HRH the Emir of Kuwait"

479

Emolument

a salary, fee, or profit from employment or office.
"the directors' emoluments"

480

Demimonde 

a class of women considered to be of doubtful social standing and morality.
a group of people on the fringes of respectable society.
"the demi-monde of arms deals"

481

Paragon 

a person or thing regarded as a perfect example of a particular quality.
"it would have taken a paragon of virtue not to feel viciously jealous"

482

Percolate

(of a liquid or gas) filter gradually through a porous surface or substance.
"the water percolating through the soil may leach out minerals"

483

Grapevine

used to refer to the circulation of rumours and unofficial information.
"I'd heard on the grapevine that the business was nearly settled"

484

Dandy 

a man unduly concerned with looking stylish and fashionable.
"his floppy handkerchiefs and antique cufflinks gave him the look of a dandy"

485

Pied piper

a person who induces others to follow or imitate him or her, especially by means of false or extravagant promises.

Clinton campaign's deliberate elevation of Donald Trump with its pied piper strategy backfired big time.

486

At wits end

at the limits of one's mental resources.

I'm at my wit's end with this problem. I cannot figure it out. Tom could do no more. He was at his wit's end.

487

Proffer

hold out or put forward (something) to someone for acceptance.
"she proffered a glass of wine"

488

Passé

no longer fashionable; out of date.
"minis are passé—the best skirts are knee-length"

489

Ensconced 

establish or settle (someone) in a comfortable, safe place.
"Agnes ensconced herself in their bedroom"

490

Senectitude

Old age; elderliness.

491

Gaunt

(of a person) lean and haggard, especially because of suffering, hunger, or age.
"a tall, gaunt woman in black"

492

Privation

a state in which food and other essentials for well-being are lacking.
"years of rationing and privation"

493

Egress

the action of going out of or leaving a place.
"direct means of access and egress for passengers"

494

Grovel

act obsequiously in order to obtain forgiveness or favour.
"they criticized leaders who grovelled to foreign patrons"

495

Kowtow

act in an excessively subservient manner.
"she didn't have to kowtow to a boss"

496

Hijinks

boisterous celebration or merrymaking; unrestrained fun:
The city is full of conventioneers indulging in their usual high jinks

497

Roly poly

(of a person) having a round, plump appearance.
"a roly-poly young boy"

498

Budding

(of a person) beginning and showing signs of promise in a particular sphere.
"budding young actors"

499

Double entendre

a word or phrase open to two interpretations, one of which is usually risqué or indecent.
"he was unable to get through two consecutive sentences without a smutty double entendre"

500

Veridical

truthful.
"Pilate's attitude to the veridical"

501

Stooge

a subordinate used by another to do unpleasant routine work.
"party stooges put there to do a job on behalf of central office"

502

Sired

(of a person) be the father of.
"his father had just that measure of talent which so often sires a genius"

503

Labile

liable to change; easily altered.
"persons whose blood pressure is more labile will carry an enhanced risk of heart attack"

504

Dragooned

coerce (someone) into doing something.
"she had been dragooned into helping with the housework"

505

Paramour 

a lover, especially the illicit partner of a married person.

506

Nubile 

(of a girl or woman) sexually attractive.
"he employed a procession of nubile young secretaries"

507

Minutiae

the small, precise, or trivial details of something.
"the minutiae of everyday life"

508

Matriculate

be enrolled at a college or university.
"they had recently matriculated as undergraduates at Jesus College"

509

Titular

holding or constituting a purely formal position or title without any real authority.
"the queen is titular head of the Church of England"

510

Peter out

to diminish gradually and stop; dwindle to nothing

511

Ingrate

an ungrateful person.

I told john not to be an ingrate

512

Mediocrity

the state or quality of being mediocre.

513

De rigueur

required by etiquette or current fashion.
"it was de rigueur for bands to grow their hair long"

514

Odium 

general or widespread hatred or disgust incurred by someone as a result of their actions.
"he incurred widespread odium for military failures and government corruption"

515

Perquisites

a benefit which one enjoys or is entitled to on account of one's job or position.
"the wife of a president has all the perquisites of stardom"

516

Flunkey

a person who performs relatively menial tasks for someone else, especially obsequiously.

517

Circuitous

(of a route or journey) longer than the most direct way.
"the canal followed a circuitous route"

518

Caliginous

dark, dim, or misty.
"the caliginous sky"

519

Tenebrous

dark; shadowy or obscure.
"the tenebrous spiral staircase of the self"

520

Crestfallen

sad and disappointed.
"he came back empty-handed and crestfallen"

521

Jocose

playful or humorous.
"a jocose allusion"

522

Enunciate

say or pronounce clearly.
"she enunciated each word slowly"

523

Inflection point

a time of significant change in a situation; a turning point.

the economy has crossed an inflection point and is poised for bigger things

524

Cherubic

having the innocence or plump prettiness of a young child.
"a round, cherubic face"

525

Foray

a sudden attack or incursion into enemy territory, especially to obtain something; a raid.
"the garrison made a foray against Richard's camp"

526

Concomitant

naturally accompanying or associated.
"she loved travel, with all its concomitant worries"

527

Portico

a structure consisting of a roof supported by columns at regular intervals, typically attached as a porch to a building.

528

Lofty

of imposing height.
"the elegant square was shaded by lofty palms"

529

Endearing

inspiring affection. Lovable
"an endearing little grin"

530

Betide

happen.
"I waited with beating heart, not knowing what would betide"

531

Victual

food or provisions.
"turkey and other savoury victuals were served"

532

Ruddy

(of a person's face) having a healthy red colour.
"a cheerful pipe-smoking man of ruddy complexion"

533

Rubicund

(especially of someone's face) having a ruddy complexion.
"he was more than a little rubicund"

534

Viperous

having the qualities attributed to a viper : malignant, venomous the backstabbing of a viperous family.

535

Limpid

clear and accessible, lucid

Standing out as a book writer today requires more than a bright idea and limpid prose. The limpid waters of the Caribbean

536

Sullen

bad-tempered and sulky.
"a sullen pout"

537

Garland

a wreath of flowers and leaves, worn on the head or hung as a decoration.

538

Stinting

be very economical or mean about spending or providing something.
"he doesn't stint on wining and dining"

539

Curtsy

a woman's or girl's formal greeting made by bending the knees with one foot in front of the other.
"she bobbed a curtsy to him"

540

Waspish

readily expressing anger or irritation.
"he had a waspish tongue"

541

Giddy

having a sensation of whirling and a tendency to fall or stagger; dizzy.
"Luke felt almost giddy with relief"

542

Distrait

distracted or absent-minded.
"he seemed oddly distrait"

543

Loutish

(of a man or boy) uncouth and aggressive; thuggish.
"youths responsible for awful, loutish behaviour"

544

Repatriate

send (someone) back to their own country.
"the last German POWs were repatriated in November 1948"

545

Thaumaturge

a worker of wonders and performer of miracles; a magician.

546

Funereal

having the mournful, sombre character appropriate to a funeral.
"Erika was moving at a funereal pace"

547

Nota bene

nota bene comes from the Latin roots notāre ("to note") and bene ("well")

548

Agape

(of a person's mouth) wide open in surprise or wonder.
"Downes listened, mouth agape with incredulity"

549

Decalogue

the Ten Commandments.

how hard would it be to improve the decalogue?

550

Conscientious

wishing to do one's work or duty well and thoroughly.
"a conscientious man, he took his duties very seriously"

551

Realpolitik 

a system of politics or principles based on practical rather than moral or ideological considerations

Many in both Riyadh and Jerusalem seemed inclined to view Trump as stronger that Obama, and to welcome a realpolitik devoid of pesky humanitarian concerns.

552

Teeming

be full of or swarming with.
"every garden is teeming with wildlife"

553

Atomise 

break up into small units.
"by disrupting our ties with our neighbours, crime atomizes society"

554

Niggardly

ungenerous with money, time, etc.; mean.
"he accused the Government of being unbelievably niggardly"

555

Stickler

a person who insists on a certain quality or type of behaviour.
"he's a stickler for accuracy"

556

Pleonexia

extreme greed for wealth or material possessions; avarice

‘Because we stand to lose more than we could gain from unbridled pleonexia we have entered into a compact neither to do nor to allow injustice.’

557

Thrasonical 

boastful; vainglorious.

His humour is lofty, his discourse peremptory, his tongue filed, his eye ambitious, his gait majestical, and his general behaviour vain, ridiculous, and thrasonical.

558

Physiognomy 

a person's facial features or expression, especially when regarded as indicative of character or ethnic origin.
"friends began to notice a change in his physiognomy"

559

Pussyfooting

To act or proceed cautiously or timidly to avoid committing oneself, like a cat circling carefuly around something it finds distasteful

560

plenitude

an abundance.
"an ancient Celtic god thought to bring a plenitude of wealth or food"

561

Tumefaction

an action or process of swelling or becoming tumorous. swelling.


I suffered a fall in London walking down the stairs which had caused a tumefaction of the ankle. 

562

Inquietudes

restlessness or uneasiness; disquietude

563

Reveille

a signal to arise.

Toward morning I fell into a drowse, and was awakened out of it by the reveille.

564

Sidereal

of, relating to, or expressed in relation to stars or constellations

The scientist’s calculations were based on sidereal time, which was related to the earth’s rotation around fixed planets.

565

Impish

inclined to do slightly naughty things for fun; mischievous.
"he had an impish look about him"

566

Distal

Situated away from the centre of the body or from the point of attachment.
‘the distal end of the tibia’
The opposite of proximal

567

Piddling

pathetically trivial; trifling.
"piddling little questions"

568

Expediency

the quality of being convenient and practical despite possibly being improper or immoral; convenience.
"an act of political expediency"

569

Upbraid

find fault with (someone); scold.
"he was upbraided for his slovenly appearance"

570

Gait

a person's manner of walking.
"the easy gait of an athlete"

571

Bamboozle

cheat or fool.
"he bamboozled Canada's largest banks in a massive counterfeit scam"

572

Amity

friendship; peaceful harmony.

573

Asomatous

having no material body; incorporeal.

574

Manseutude

meekness; gentleness.

throughout history, manseutude of Christianity is hard to come by

575

Putschist

A German word meaning push, used to mean an attempt to overthrow a government by force.

576

Guffaw

laugh loudly and heartily.
"both men guffawed at the remark"

577

Lustration

to purify by a propitiatory offering or other ceremonial method.


578

Quondam

that once was; former.
"quondam dissidents joined the establishment"

579

Reification

Reification is making something real, bringing something into being, or making something concrete.

to reify a concept

580

Incubus

a male demon believed to have sexual intercourse with sleeping women. A nightmare


I resolved to gather all my faculties together, and for ever rid me of this intolerable incubus.

581

Malefaction

an evil deed; crime; wrongdoing.

the town treasurer has been linked to the kickback scheme and other financial malefactions

582

Simonise

polish (a motor vehicle).
"you'll never know how beautiful you can make your car look until you Simonize it"

583

Harbinger

anything that foreshadows a future event; omen; sign:
Frost is a harbinger of winter.

584

Gerontocracy

a state, society, or group governed by old people.
government based on rule by old people.

585

Demean

to reduce to a lower standing in one's own eyes or in others' eyes we were demeaned by our shabby appearance at the funeral

586

Countervailing

offset the effect of (something) by countering it with something of equal force.
"the dominance of the party was mediated by a number of countervailing factors"

587

Riven asunder

tear apart,

If one bad leak will cause a shipwreck, how is the craft to mount the waves with every plank riven asunder?

588

Conurbation

an extended urban area, typically consisting of several towns merging with the suburbs of a central city.
"the major conurbations of London and Birmingham"

589

Envenom

put poison on or into; make poisonous.
"tribal rivalries envenom the bitter civil war"

590

Pneumatic 

having a well-proportioned feminine figure;

A pneumatic woman

591

Officious

intrusively enthusiastic in offering help or advice; interfering.
"an officious bystander"

592

Aseptic

free from contamination caused by harmful bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms; surgically sterile or sterilized

593

Decanted

gradually pour (wine, port, or another liquid) from one container into another, typically in order to separate out sediment.
"he decanted the rich red liquid into some glasses"

594

Reconnaisance

The act or an instance of exploring or investigating:

They had already made various reconnaisance trips to scout Mr Johnson's home as they planned the raid

595

Pituitary gland

the major endocrine gland, a pea-sized body attached to the base of the brain that is important in controlling growth and development and the functioning of the other endocrine glands

596

Immanent

existing or operating within; inherent.
"the protection of liberties is immanent in constitutional arrangements"

597

Flexuous

full of bends and curves.
"he put an arm around her flexuous waist"

598

Coprophagy

the eating of faeces or dung.

flies, being coprophagic insects, are considered dirty

599

Viviparous

(of an animal) bringing forth live young which have developed inside the body of the parent.

humans are viviparous animals

600

Discarnate

(of a person or being) not having a physical body.
"methods for communicating with the dead or with discarnate spirits"

601

Sibilant

making or characterized by a hissing sound.
"his sibilant whisper"

602

Egesta

waste matter discharged from the body, especially faeces and urine.
"his egesta were often tinged with blood"

603

Enjoin

instruct or urge (someone) to do something.
"the code enjoined members to trade fairly"

604

Cruciferous vegetables

vegetables relating to or denoting plants of the cabbage family

cauliflower, cabbage, garden cress, bok choy, broccoli, brussels sprouts and similar green leaf vegetables

605

Eructation

a belch.
"I heard what sounded like a half-stoppered eructation"

606

Purview

the scope of the influence or concerns of something.
"such a case might be within the purview of the legislation"

Only testable ideas are within the purview of science

607

distend

swell or cause to swell by pressure from inside.
"the abdomen distended rapidly"

608

Investiture

a ceremony in which someone is given an official rank, authority, power, etc.:

The investiture of the new president will take place this evening.

609

Savoir faire

the ability to act or speak appropriately in social situations.
"this is a gracious occasion, so try to behave with a bit of savoir faire"

610

Bulimic

serious eating disorder that occurs chiefly in females, is characterized by compulsive overeating usually followed by self-induced vomiting or laxative or diuretic abuse, and is often accompanied by guilt and depression

611

Ruminant 

an even-toed ungulate mammal that chews the cud regurgitated from its rumen. The ruminants comprise the cattle, sheep, antelopes, deer, giraffes, and their relatives.

612

Peristaltic

successive waves of involuntary contraction passing along the walls of a hollow muscular structure (such as the esophagus or intestine) and forcing the contents onward

The intestine performs peristaltic function

613

Equipoise

balance of forces or interests. Equilibrium
"this temporary equipoise of power"

614

Bolus

a small rounded mass of a substance, especially of chewed food at the moment of swallowing.
"mucin holds the particles of food together in a ball or bolus"

615

Desiccate

remove the moisture from (something), typically in order to preserve it. Dried up
"desiccated coconut"

616

Bedevil

(of something bad) cause great and continual trouble to.
"projects like this are bedevilled by a shortage of cash"

(of a person) torment or harass.
"he bedevilled them with petty practical jokes"

617

Ghoulish

morbidly interested in death or disaster.
"she told the story with ghoulish relish"

618

Putrescible

liable to decay; subject to putrefaction.
"putrescible domestic waste"

619

Cavalcade

a formal procession of people walking, on horseback, or riding in vehicles.
"the royal cavalcade proceeded through the city"

620

Gadabout

a habitual pleasure-seeker.
"Walter was a restless charmer and a gadabout"

621

Sanatorium

an establishment for the medical treatment of people who are convalescing or have a chronic illness.

622

Putrefaction

the process of decay or rotting in a body or other organic matter.
"the breeze shifted and we caught the stench of putrefaction"

623

Mastication

To chew

624

Extricate 

free (someone or something) from a constraint or difficulty.
"he was trying to extricate himself from official duties"

625

Flounder

struggle mentally; show or feel great confusion.
"she floundered, not knowing quite what to say"

626

Embargo

impose an official ban on (trade or a country or commodity).
"all of these countries have been embargoed by the US"

627

Embittered

make (someone) feel bitter or resentful.
"he died an embittered man"

628

Embolden

give (someone) the courage or confidence to do something.
"emboldened by the claret, he pressed his knee against hers

629

Pleonasm

the use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning (e.g. see with one's eyes ), either as a fault of style or for emphasis.

To the contrary, Robbins resorted to such pleonastic phraseology as a means of emphasizing the inscrutability of these data

630

Emetic

(of a substance) causing vomiting.

emetic social media reaction following Trump's victory.

631

Nativism 

the policy of protecting the interests of native-born or established inhabitants against those of immigrants.

632

Nativity

1. the occasion of a person's birth.
"the place of my nativity"

2. the birth of Jesus Christ.

633

Autarky

a country, state, or society which is economically independent.

A contemporary example of extreme autarky is North Korea’s system of juche

634

Repose

a state of rest, sleep, or tranquillity.
"in repose her face looked relaxed"

635

Immure

enclose or confine (someone) against their will.
"her brother was immured in a lunatic asylum"

636

Congeal

o change from a liquid or soft state to a thick or solid state:
The blood had congealed in thick black clots.

637

Cloudburst

a sudden violent rainstorm.

638

Braggadocio

boastful or arrogant behaviour.

639

Defray 

provide money to pay (a cost or expense).
"the proceeds from the raffle help to defray the expenses of the evening"

640

Toady

act in an obsequious way.
"she imagined him toadying to his rich clients"

641

Craven 

contemptibly lacking in courage; cowardly.
"a craven abdication of his moral duty"

642

Obstreperous

noisy and difficult to control.
"the boy is cocky and obstreperous"

643

Foraging

search (a place) so as to obtain food.
"units that were foraging a particular area"

644

Pittance

a very small or inadequate amount of money.
"he paid his workers a pittance"

645

Ham-fisted

clumsy; bungling.
"a ham-fisted attempt"

646

Saturnalia

the ancient Roman festival of Saturn in December, a period of general merrymaking and the predecessor of Christmas.


an unrestrained often licentious celebration : orgy

647

Derisive

expressing contempt or ridicule.
"he gave a harsh, derisive laugh"

648

Coterminous

having the same border or covering the same area.

The parishes in these counties were ordered to be coterminous with the bounds of the counties.

649

Natality

the ratio of the number of births to the size of the population; birth rate.
"in spite of falling natality, the population as a whole went up"

650

Suzerain

a sovereign or state having some control over another state that is internally autonomous.

‘Both the United States and Japan are deeply worried about the future trajectory of a nuclear-equipped North Korean state, and in the long run by a unified Korea strategically tied more to its historical suzerain - China - than to the West.’

651

Infra dig

beneath one; demeaning

"she regarded playing for the Pony Club as deeply infra dig"

652

Skylarking

pass time by playing tricks or practical jokes; indulge in horseplay.
"he was skylarking with a friend when he fell into a pile of boxes"

653

Effete

no longer capable of effective action.
"the authority of an effete aristocracy began to dwindle"

654

Sepulchral

gloomy; dismal.
"a speech delivered in sepulchral tones"

655

In extremis

in extreme circumstances; especially : at the point of death

656

incommodious

inconvenient, as not affording sufficient space or room; uncomfortable:

incommodious hotel accommodations.

657

Sui generis

unique.
"the sui generis nature of animals"

658

Time immemorial

a time in the past that was so long ago that people have no knowledge or memory of it.
"markets had been held there from time immemorial"

659

Promontory

a point of high land that juts out into the sea or a large lake; a headland.
"a rocky promontory"

660

Spruce

neat or smart in appearance

dress sprucely

661

Spurn

reject with disdain or contempt.
"he spoke gruffly, as if afraid that his invitation would be spurned"

662

Bridle at

to show that one is offended by someone or something.

She bridled at the suggestion that she should go. Tony bridled at Max. Max was going to have to be dealt with.

663

Cavil

make petty or unnecessary objections.
"they cavilled at the cost"

664

Assignation

Appointment, engagement, Tryst

665

Decorum

behaviour in keeping with good taste and propriety.
"he had acted with the utmost decorum"

666

Dint of

If you achieve a result by dint of something, you achieve it by means of that thing.

He succeeds by dint of sheer hard work.
He has acquired, by dint of threatening to resign, a directorate-general with about 150 officials.

667

Sentinel

a person or thing that watches or stands as if watching.

668

Zeitgeist

the defining spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time.
"the story captured the zeitgeist of the late 1960s"

669

Trammels

restrictions or impediments to freedom of action.
"we will forge our own future, free from the trammels of materialism"

670

Affront

to insult especially to the face by behavior or language He was affronted by her rudeness.

671

Gustatory

concerned with tasting or the sense of taste.
"gustatory delights"

672

Satiate

satisfied to the full; sated.
"satiate with power, of fame and wealth possess'd"

673

Satiety

the quality or state of being fed or gratified to or beyond capacity

eating beyond the point of satiety

674

Substratum

a foundation or basis of something.
"there is a broad substratum of truth in her story"

675

Lionise

give a lot of public attention and approval to (someone); treat as a celebrity.
"modern sportsmen are lionized and feted"

676

Doldrums

a state or period of stagnation or depression.
"the mortgage market has been in the doldrums for three years"

677

Machinations

a plot or scheme.

he was cheated by the political machinations of the legislature

678

Peradventure

Doubt,

a fact established beyond peradventure

679

Succour

give assistance or aid to.
"prisoners of war were liberated and succoured"

680

Bohemian

a socially unconventional person, especially one who is involved in the arts.

681

Abeyance 

a state of temporary disuse or suspension.
"matters were held in abeyance pending further enquiries"

682

Hauteur

proud haughtiness of manner.
"she swept into the room with formidable hauteur"

683

Adjutant

one who helps : assistant

684

Duumvirate

a coalition of two people having joint authority or influence.
"real power will devolve into the hands of a duumvirate"

685

Underhandedness 

secretive or dishonest behaviour.
"he rules with a combination of threats and underhandedness"

686

Divined

discover (something) by guesswork or intuition.
"mum had divined my state of mind"

687

Whitewash

a : to gloss over or cover up (such as vices or crimes) refused to whitewash the scandal
b : to exonerate by means of a perfunctory investigation or through biased presentation of data

688

Goaded

provoke or annoy (someone) so as to stimulate an action or reaction.
"he was trying to goad her into a fight"

689

Earshot

the range or distance over which one can hear or be heard.
"she waited until he was out of earshot before continuing"

690

Armistice

an agreement made by opposing sides in a war to stop fighting for a certain time; a truce.
"the Italian government signed an armistice with the Allies"

691

Chiliastic

The doctrine stating that Jesus will reign on earth for 1,000 years.

Pertaining to the religious doctrine of a thousand-year period of peace and prosperity; millenarian.

692

Primodium

the rudiment or commencement of a part

the primordium of feminism

693

Coruscating

flashing; sparkling.
"a coruscating kaleidoscope of colours"

694

Weathervane

a politician who has frequent changes of opinion.

Mitt Romney has become a weathervane since running for president.

695

Supplicant 

A supplicant is a person who prays to God or respectfully asks an important person to help them or to give them something that they want very much.
[formal]
He flung himself down in the flat submissive posture of a mere supplicant.

696

Gallivanting

go around from one place to another in the pursuit of pleasure or entertainment.
"she quit her job to go gallivanting around the globe"

697

Execrate

to curse; imprecate evil upon; damn; denounce:
He execrated all who opposed him.

698

Cabal

a secret political clique or faction.
"a cabal of dissidents"

699

Elide

to leave out of consideration : omit

Worst of all, they elide the obvious point that all revolts fluctuate between periods of progress and regression.

some unnecessary verbiage will need to be elided, but otherwise the article is publishable

700

Mutable

liable to change.
"the mutable nature of fashion"

701

Peripatetic 

travelling from place to place, in particular working or based in various places for relatively short periods.
"the peripatetic nature of military life"

702

Fib

a lie, typically an unimportant one.
"why did you tell him such a dreadful fib?"

703

Enfeebled

make weak or feeble.
"trade unions are in an enfeebled state"

704

Fissiparous

inclined to cause or undergo division into separate parts or groups.
"the fissiparous tendencies innate in tribalism"

705

Prestidigitation

conjuring tricks performed as entertainment.

It was, all in all, a wondrous feat of prestidigitation, worthy of a Las Vegas magician.

706

Imbroglio

an extremely confused, complicated, or embarrassing situation.

And then there's a general imbroglio, everyone standing up and the kid hollering and the dog barking

707

Hypertrophic

A nontumorous enlargement of an organ or a tissue as a result of an increase in the size rather than the number of constituent cells: muscle hypertrophy.

708

Throes

intense or violent pain and struggle, especially accompanying birth, death, or great change.
"he convulsed in his death throes"

709

Coniferous

Evergreen

coniferous term of a contract

710

postmortem lividity

a purple coloration of dependent parts, except in areas of contact pressure, appearing within 30 minutes to 2 hours after death, as a result of gravitational movement of blood within the vessels.


711

Lividity livid

. Extremely angry; furious.

712

Sotto voce

in a quiet voice.
"‘It won't be cheap,’ he added sotto voce"

713

Ocular 

of or connected with the eyes or vision.
"ocular trauma"

714

Coagulate

(of a fluid, especially blood) change to a solid or semi-solid state.
"blood had coagulated round the edges of the gash"

715

Rumbustious

noisy and lacking in restraint or discipline

“beneath the rumbustious surface of his paintings is sympathy for the vulnerability of ordinary human beings”

716

Revile

criticize in an abusive or angrily insulting manner.
"he was now reviled by the party that he had helped to lead"

717

Supplant

supersede and replace.
"domestic production has been supplanted by imports and jobs have been lost"

718

Debility

physical weakness, especially as a result of illness.

"most of the cases presented with general debility, muscle weakness, and weight loss"

719

Reconnoiter

make a military observation of (a region).
"they reconnoitred the beach some weeks before the landing"

720

Eristic

of or characterized by debate or argument.

Christopher Hitchens was an eristic contrarian 

721

Osculation

kiss, kissing

722

Bait-and-switch

the action (generally illegal) of advertising goods which are an apparent bargain, with the intention of substituting inferior or more expensive goods.

723

Bovine

relating to or affecting cattle.
"bovine tuberculosis"

724

Ambulatory

relating to or adapted for walking.

(of a patient) able to walk about; ambulant.

Ambulatory surgery

725

Temperate

showing moderation or self-restraint.
"Charles was temperate in his consumption of both food and drink"

726

Albatross

something or someone you want to be free from because that thing or person is causing you problems:

Fame has become an albatross that prevents her from leading a normal and happy life.

727

Cackleberry

egg

728

Remonstrate

make a forcefully reproachful protest.
"he turned angrily to remonstrate with Tommy"

729

Previable period, previable fetus

occurring before a fetus has developed enough to survive outside the uterus

730

Gourmandise

eat good food, especially to excess.

for more years than I care to remember, I would gourmandise my way around the world, caring little for fat or calories, soldium or sugar content

731

Gourmand

a person who enjoys eating and often eats too much.

the kind of gourmand who swallows food without even pausing to taste it

732

Propinquity

the state of being close to someone or something; proximity.

Don't let geographical propinquity determine your choice

733

Leitmotif 

a recurrent theme throughout a musical or literary composition, associated with a particular person, idea, or situation.

734

Impregnable 

(of a fortified position) unable to be captured or broken into.
"a massive and impregnable fortress"

735

Vouchsafe

reveal or disclose (information).
"you'd never vouchsafed that interesting titbit before"

736

Blandishments

a flattering or pleasing statement or action used as a means of gently persuading someone to do something.

At first he used his arts of blandishment and honeyed words in order to lure Savonarola to Rome

737

Plasticity 

The quality of being easily shaped or moulded.

‘fine clay, at the right degree of plasticity, is more useful’

738

Desiderata

something that is needed or wanted.
"integrity was a desideratum"

739

Piffle

nonsense.

"it's absolute piffle to say that violence is ok"

740

Antecedent 

a preceding event, condition, or cause events that were antecedents of the war

741

Noblesse oblige

privilege entails responsibility.
"the notion of noblesse oblige was part of the ethic of the country gentleman"

742

Riff raff

disreputable or undesirable people.
"I saw the sort of riff-raff that had been invited"

743

Obeisance

deferential respect.
"they paid obeisance to the Prince"

744

Gangrenous

pervasive decay or corruption : rot moral gangrene

This church body has been afflicted with a spiritual gangrene that is poisoning our relationship with the Lord,

745

Cretinous

Cretin - a stupid, obtuse, or mentally defective person.

746

Quiescent

in a state or period of inactivity or dormancy.
"strikes were headed by groups of workers who had previously been quiescent"

747

Agent Provocateur

a person employed to induce others to break the law so that they can be convicted.

748

Fusillade

a series of shots fired or missiles thrown all at the same time or in quick succession.
"marchers had to dodge a fusillade of missiles"

749

hermetic

(of a seal or closure) complete and airtight.
"a hermetic seal that ensures perfect waterproofing"

750

Adamantine

made of or having the quality of adamant

the adamantine opposition of his parents to his marriage to a girl from a poor family

751

Denouement

the outcome of a situation, when something is decided or made clear; outcome
"I waited by the eighteenth green to see the denouement"

752

Parlay

to use (one's money, talent, or other assets) to achieve a desired objective, as spectacular wealth or success:

He parlayed a modest inheritance into a fortune.

753

Satyriasis 

uncontrollable or excessive sexual desire in a man.

754

Eyewash

insincere talk; nonsense.
"all that stuff about blood being thicker than water was a lot of eyewash"

755

connive

conspire to do something immoral, illegal, or harmful.
"she connived with a senior official to rig the results of last year's election"

756

Tomfoolery

foolish or silly behaviour.
"the tomfoolery of MPs at question time"

757

Misgivings

a feeling of doubt or apprehension about the outcome or consequences of something.
"we have misgivings about the way the campaign is being run"

758

Francophone

French-speaking.
"a summit of francophone countries"

759

Necrocracy

A government that still operates under the rules of a former, dead leader.

North Korea is the world's only necrocracy. 

760

Exhumation

the action of digging up something buried, especially a corpse.
"the exhumation of bodies was ordered following protests by the villagers"

761

Interregnum

a period during which the normal functions of government or control are suspended

762

Oracular

relating to an oracle; prophetic
"the oracular shrine"

763

Longanimity

patient endurance of hardship, injuries, or offense; forbearance.

764

Trope 

figure of speech; cliche



765

Corpuscles

a minute or elementary particle of matter, as an electron, proton, or atom.

766

Latrine

a toilet, especially a communal one in a camp or barracks.

767

Clamorous

making a loud and confused noise.
"a jostling, clamorous mob"

768

Ravenous

extremely hungry.
"I'd been out all day and was ravenous"

769

Ululation

If someone ululates, they make quickly repeated loud sounds, often to express sorrow or happiness.

770

Nom de plume

an assumed name used by a writer instead of their real name; a pen-name.
"she is better known under her nom de plume of Daniel Stern"

771

Honorific

given as a mark of respect but having few or no duties.
"he was elevated to the honorific status of ‘Dom’"

772

In absentia

while not present at the event being referred to.

"two foreign suspects will be tried in absentia"

773

Rebuff

reject (someone or something) in an abrupt or ungracious manner.

"I asked her to be my wife, and was rebuffed in no uncertain terms"

774

Compos mentis

having full control of one's mind.
"are you sure he was totally compos mentis?"

775

Parturition

the action of giving birth to young; childbirth.
"the weeks following parturition"

776

Felix Culpa

An apparent error or disaster with happy consequences.

It was initially viewed as a disaster but in the end it ended up being a felix culpa

777

Brutum fulmen

an empty threat

Nothing but a brutum fulmen

778

Cui bono

who stands, or stood, to gain (from a crime, and so might have been responsible for it)?

applying the cui bono principle is a good start to solving a murder case

779

Lamebrained 

A stupid person; dope, knucklehead

780

Extant

still in existence; surviving.
"an extant letter"

781

Hermaphrodite

of or denoting a person, animal, or plant having both male and female sex organs or other sexual characteristics.
"hermaphrodite creatures in classical sculpture"

782

Opaque

not able to be seen through; not transparent.
"bottles filled with a pale opaque liquid"

783

Ramshackle

in a state of severe disrepair.
"a ramshackle cottage"

784

Dysentery

infection of the intestines resulting in severe diarrhoea with the presence of blood and mucus in the faeces.

785

Fulcrum

a thing that plays a central or essential role in an activity, event, or situation.
"research is the fulcrum of the academic community"

786

Sub specie aeternitatis

viewed in relation to the eternal; in a universal perspective.
"sub specie aeternitatis the authors have got it about right"

787

Filial

relating to or due from a son or daughter.
"a display of filial affection"

788

Querulous

complaining in a rather petulant or whining manner.
"she became querulous and demanding"

789

Vestibule

an antechamber, hall, or lobby next to the outer door of a building.

790

Beatitude

supreme blessedness.
"the expression of beatitude the religious sometimes adopt"

791

Prurient

having or encouraging an excessive interest in sexual matters, especially the sexual activity of others.
"she'd been the subject of much prurient curiosity"

792

Ursine

relating to or resembling bears.

ursine characteristics 

793

Truant 

a pupil who stays away from school without leave or explanation.

Absentee

794

Deus ex machina

an unexpected power or event saving a seemingly hopeless situation, especially as a contrived plot device in a play or novel.

any artificial or improbable device resolving the difficulties of a plot.

795

Bibulous

excessively fond of drinking alcohol

796

Tycoon

a wealthy, powerful person in business or industry.
"a newspaper tycoon"

797

Negritude

The quality or fact of being of black African origin.

Black Lives Matter seeks to blame their economic declension on negritude but this isn't enough to explain

798

Tete-a-tete

a private conversation between two people.

"it so happened that their tête-à-tête was in earshot"

799

Dipsomaniac 

a person with an irresistible craving for alcoholic drink.

800

Argot

the jargon or slang of a particular group or class.
"teenage argot"

801

Pudendum

a person's external genitals, especially a woman's.

802

Hinterland

the remote areas of a country away from the coast or the banks of major rivers.
"the hinterland of southern Italy"

803

Admixture

a mixture.
"he felt that his work was an admixture of aggression and creativity"

804

Analeptic

tending to restore a person's health or strength; restorative.

Chicken broth is said to have analeptic properties

805

Declension

deterioration; decline. a condition of decline or moral deterioration.

‘the declension of the new generation’

806

Philoprogenitive

having many offspring.
"a philoprogenitive ill-paid artisan"

807

Vagarious

erratic and unpredictable in behaviour or direction.
"the vagarious behaviour of some particles"

808

Panoptic

showing or seeing the whole at one view.
"a panoptic aerial view"

809

Variegated

marked by variety.
"his variegated and amusing observations"

810

Esurient

hungry or greedy.

811

Votaries

a devoted admirer; devotee

I am a votary of Christopher Hitchens

812

Ectoplasm

a supernatural viscous substance that supposedly exudes from the body of a medium during a spiritualistic trance and forms the material for the manifestation of spirits.

813

Laureate

a person who is honoured with an award for outstanding creative or intellectual achievement.
"a Nobel laureate"

814

Blighted

spoil, harm, or destroy.
"the scandal blighted the careers of several leading politicians"

815

Inebriate

make (someone) drunk; intoxicate.
"I got mildly inebriated"

816

Pearls before swines

to offer something valuable or good to someone who does not know its value:

I'm afraid you're casting pearls before swine with your good advice - he won't listen.

817

Debutante 

an upper-class young woman making her first appearance in fashionable society.

818

Elope

run away secretly in order to get married.
"later he eloped with one of the housemaids"

819

Iridescent

showing luminous colours that seem to change when seen from different angles.
"the drake's head has an iridescent purple sheen"

820

Senescent senescence

Growing old; aging.

The process of being senescent is better known as what?

821

Appurtenance 

an accessory or other item associated with a particular activity or style of living.
"the appurtenances of consumer culture"

822

Porcine

of, affecting, or resembling a pig or pigs.
"his flushed, porcine features"

823

venial

(of a fault or offence) slight and pardonable.

‘For a start, it's hard to imagine a more venial form of corruption than merely speeding along someone's visa application.’

824

Dawdle

waste time; be slow.
"she mustn't dawdle—she had to make the call now"

825

Insensate

without sense or reason; foolish; stupid

What is this insensate babble?

826

Luxuriate

enjoy (something) as a luxury; take self-indulgent delight in.
"she was luxuriating in a long bath"

827

Lacuna

an unfilled space; a gap.
"the journal has filled a lacuna in Middle Eastern studies"

828

Encomium

a speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly.

829

Lucubration

writing or study.
"after sixteen years' lucubration he produced this account"

830

Inamorata

a person's female lover.
"his new inamorata is a twenty-two-year-old mannequin named Jennifer"

831

Explicate

analyse and develop (an idea or principle) in detail.
"an attempt to explicate the relationship between crime and economic forces"

832

Protectorate

a state that is controlled and protected by another.
"Panama was juridically a protectorate of the United States"

833

Dramatis personae

the characters of a play, novel, or narrative.
"he has little gift for bringing his dramatis personae to life"

834

Cataclysmic 

(of a natural event) large-scale and violent.
"a cataclysmic earthquake"

835

Guileless 

devoid of guile; innocent and without deception.
"his face, once so open and guileless"

836

Epigram

a pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way.
"a Wildean epigram"

837

Contumely

insolent or insulting language or treatment.
"the Church should not be exposed to gossip and contumely"

838

Renascent

becoming active or popular again.
"renascent fascism"

839

Arraign

call or bring (someone) before a court to answer a criminal charge. Prosecute
"her sister was arraigned on charges of attempted murder"

840

Pander

gratify or indulge (an immoral or distasteful desire or taste or a person with such a desire or taste).
"newspapers are pandering to people's baser instincts"

841

Demotic

denoting or relating to the kind of language used by ordinary people; colloquial.
"a demotic idiom"

842

Hocus pocus

meaningless talk or activity, typically designed to trick someone or conceal the truth of a situation.
"some people still view psychology as a lot of hocus-pocus"

843

Puissant

having great power or influence.
"he would become a puissant man"

844

Germinal

Of, relating to, or occurring in the earliest stage of development: was active in the germinal stages of the space program.

845

Saturnine

(of a person or their manner) gloomy.
"a saturnine temperament"

846

Avow

assert or confess openly.
"he avowed that he had voted Labour in every election"

847

Legatee

one to whom a legacy is bequeathed

the couple had no children, so they declared their nephew their only legatee

848

Strictures

a restriction on a person or activity.
"the strictures imposed by the British Board of Film Censors"

849

Forsake

abandon or leave.
"he would never forsake Tara"

850

Liquefaction 

the state of being liquefied.

851

Rotundity

the condition or quality of roundness or plumpness, as of an object or person.

The theory of the rotundity of the earth was not born with Columbus.

852

Acuity

sharpness or keenness of thought, vision, or hearing.
"intellectual acuity"

853

Asperity

harshness of tone or manner.
"he pointed this out with some asperity"

854

Pyrotechnic

relating to fireworks.
"a pyrotechnic display"

855

Vapid 

offering nothing that is stimulating or challenging; bland.
"tuneful but vapid musical comedies"

856

Numinous

having a strong religious or spiritual quality; indicating or suggesting the presence of a divinity.
"the strange, numinous beauty of this ancient landmark"

857

Suppurate

to produce or discharge pus, as a wound; maturate.

858

Also-ran

a loser in a race or other contest, especially by a large margin.
"the line between champions and also-rans"

859

Verbiage

excessively lengthy or technical speech or writing.
"the basic idea here, despite all the verbiage, is simple"

860

Jauntiness

showing that you are happy and confident:
a jaunty grin/step.

861

Shirk

avoid or neglect (a duty or responsibility).
"I do not shirk any responsibility in this matter"

862

Disquisition

a long or elaborate essay or discussion on a particular subject.
"nothing can kill a radio show quicker than a disquisition on intertextual analysis"

863

Connubial

relating to marriage or the relationship between a married couple; conjugal.
"their connubial bed"

864

Indigence 

a state of extreme poverty; destitution.
"he did valuable work towards the relief of indigence"

865

Pusillanimous

showing a lack of courage or determination; timid.

866

Excursive

tending to deviate from a course or activity; digressive

an excursive story line that some readers of Melville's novel find very rewarding

867

Alimentary

of or relating to nourishment or nutrition

As an embryo develops, algae suffuses its body, but most becomes concentrated along its gut and alimentary canal.

868

Saunter

walk in a slow, relaxed manner.
"Adam sauntered into the room"

869

Flatulence

the accumulation of gas in the alimentary canal. Fart

"foods that may cause flatulence"

870

Scatology

an interest in or preoccupation with excrement and excretion.

Scatological humour

871

Panegyric

a public speech or published text in praise of someone or something.
"a panegyric on the pleasures of malt whisky"

872

Evanescence

Something that possesses qualities of evanescence, has a quality of disappearing or vanishing. The evanescence of a shooting star makes it hard to catch — it's there one moment and gone the next. Evanescence is a word typically used to describe an event that fades from sight or memory, or sometimes the fleeting quality of worldly success.

873

Truepenny 

an honest or trusty person

874

Lachrymose

tearful or given to weeping.
"she was pink-eyed and lachrymose"

875

Eugenics 

, the selection of desired heritable characteristics in order to improve future generations,

876

Minx

an impudent, cunning, or boldly flirtatious girl or young woman.
"you saucy little minx!"

877

Impassioned

filled with or showing great emotion.
"she made an impassioned plea for help"

878

Bereaved

(of a person) greatly saddened at being deprived by death of a loved one.

bereaved families of the victims

879

Temporal

relating to worldly as opposed to spiritual affairs; secular.
"the Church did not imitate the secular rulers who thought only of temporal gain"

880

Fealty

fidelity; faithfulness. Loyalty

It is our Islamic obligation to pledge allegiance to the Islamic State and give it our Islamic fealty,

881

Lucubrate

write or study, especially by night.

I was willing to work all day and lucubrate till dawn to get it

882

Rigmarole

a lengthy and complicated procedure.
"he went through the rigmarole of securing the front door"

883

Umpteenth

used to emphasize that something has happened on many other occasions.
"she checked her watch for the umpteenth time"

884

Motley crew

informal expression for a roughly organized assembly of individuals of various backgrounds, appearance, and character. Typical examples of motley crews are pirates, college fraternities, Western posses, rag-tag mercenary bands, freedom fighters, and IT support teams.


885

Tergiversation

evasion of straightforward action or clear-cut statement : equivocation.

the more she tergiversated, the greater grew the ardency of the reporters for an interview. Like most politicians, he has the gift for tergiversation

886

Cronyism

the appointment of friends and associates to positions of authority, without proper regard to their qualifications.
"it looked like an end to the cronyism with which many of the government's appointments had been tainted"

887

Theodicy

the vindication of divine providence in view of the existence of evil.

This is the religious exercise known as theodicy : explaining why God allows bad things to happen to good people.

888

Persnickety

overparticular; fussy.

she's very persnickety about her food

889

Miserly

of, like, or befitting a miser; penurious; stingy; niggardly.

I decided not to be miserly for once and bought first-class tickets to be sure of a seat.

890

Surefooted

able easily to walk on rough ground, without falling:

she climbed gingerly on a surefooted donkey

891

Malaise

a general feeling of discomfort, illness, or unease whose exact cause is difficult to identify.
"a general air of malaise"

892

Hirsute

hairy.
"their hirsute chests"

893

A fly in the ointment

a minor irritation that spoils the success or enjoyment of something.

894

Gingerly

in a careful or cautious manner.
"Jackson sat down very gingerly"

895

Habeas corpus 

A writ of habeas corpus is used to bring a prisoner or other detainee (e.g. institutionalized mental patient) before the court to determine if the person's imprisonment or detention is lawful.

896

Countermand

revoke or cancel (an order).
"an order to arrest the strike leaders had been countermanded"

897

Shibboleth

a custom, principle, or belief distinguishing a particular class or group of people, especially a long-standing one regarded as outmoded or no longer important.

Koreans must abandon outdated shibboleths

898

presentiment

an intuitive feeling about the future, especially one of foreboding.
"a presentiment of disaster"

899

Canon fodder

If you describe soldiers as cannon fodder, you mean that they are not considered important by their officers and are sent into war without their leaders worrying if they die.

Don't allow them to use you as cannon fodder.

900

Featherbedding

Featherbedding is the practice of hiring more workers than are needed to perform a given job, or to adopt work procedures which appear pointless, complex and time-consuming merely to employ additional workers.

Featherbedding by the state breeds complacency and soon performances begin to flag

901

Hidebound

unwilling or unable to change because of tradition or convention.
"they are working to change hidebound corporate cultures"

902

Agrarian

relating to cultivated land or the cultivation of land.
"Brazil is rapidly diversifying its agrarian economy"

903

Bumptious

irritatingly self-assertive.
"an impossibly bumptious and opinionated ass"

904

Scabrous

rough with small points or knobs, like a file; scaly or scabby

Others sang to themselves or with long fingernails picked pieces of flesh from scabrous hands.

905

Infernal

relating to or characteristic of hell or the underworld.
"the infernal regions"

906

Bedlamite

Madman, lunatic

Mr Roh has been reduced to a bedlamite

907

Supine

failing to act or protest as a result of moral weakness or indolence.
"the government was supine in the face of racial injustice"

908

Uppity

An uppity person behaves in an unpleasant way because they think that they are more important than they really are:

"an uppity MP and his lady wife"

909

Fiasco

a complete failure, especially a ludicrous or humiliating one.
"his plans turned into a fiasco"

910

Vanquished 

defeat thoroughly.
"he successfully vanquished his rival"

911

Harken back to

to remind one of something.

Seeing a horse and buggy in the park harks back to the time when horses drew milk wagons.

912

Supplication, supplicant

a person who asks a god or someone who is in a position of power for something in a humble way

the action of asking or begging for something earnestly or humbly.
"he fell to his knees in supplication"

913

Atrophy 

waste away, especially as a result of the degeneration of cells, or become vestigial during evolution.
"the calf muscles will atrophy"

914

Disgorge

to give up on request or under pressure

refused to disgorge his ill-gotten gains

915

Retroactive

(especially of legislation) taking effect from a date in the past.
"a big retroactive tax increase"

916

Pathogenic

causing or capable of causing disease

a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

917

Glacial

happening or moving extremely slowly:
The work proceeded at a glacial pace.

918

Simony

1. the making of profit out of sacred things.
2. the sin of buying or selling ecclesiastical preferments, benefices, etc.

919

Rearguard

designed to oppose or prevent in a defensive way:
a rearguard strategy.

920

Sumptuary law

Laws made for the purpose of restraining luxury or extravagance, particularly against inordinate expenditures in the matter of apparel, food, furniture, etc.

921

Annus mirabilis

a remarkable or auspicious year.

922

Recumbent

lying down; reclining; leaning.

recumbent bikes

923

Dyspeptic

having indigestion or a consequent air of irritable bad temper

924

Pointillist 

the theory or practice in art of applying small strokes or dots of color to a surface so that from a distance they blend together

925

Agglomeration

a mass or collection of things; an assemblage.
"the arts centre is an agglomeration of theatres, galleries, shops, restaurants and bars"

926

Confluence

a coming together of people or things

Happy confluence of weather and scenery

927

Dilatory

intended to cause delay.
"they resorted to dilatory tactics, forcing a postponement of peace talks"

928

Sluice

an act of rinsing or showering with water.
"a sluice with cold water"

929

Firmament

the heavens or sky.
"thunder shakes the firmament"

930

Obliquity

The quality or condition of being oblique, especially in deviating from a vertical or horizontal line, plane, position, or direction.

obliquity of earth 

931

Ovine

relating to or resembling sheep.
"the ovine immune system"

932

Filiation

the fact of being the child of a particular parent or parents.
"relationships based on ties of filiation as opposed to marriage"

933

Rigor mortis

stiffening of the joints and muscles of a body a few hours after death, usually lasting from one to four days.

934

Choleric

bad-tempered or irritable.
"he was a choleric, self-important little man"

935

Plangent

(of a sound) loud and resonant, with a mournful tone. Melancholy

"the plangent sound of a harpsichord"

936

Anodyne

not likely to cause offence or disagreement and somewhat dull.
"anodyne music"
she tried to keep the conversation as anodyne as possible

937

Limelight 

the focus of public attention.
"the shock win has thrust him into the limelight"

938

Valetudinarian

a person who is unduly anxious about their health.

939

Tortuous

full of twists and turns.
"the route is remote and tortuous"

940

Antipathy

a deep-seated feeling of aversion.
"his fundamental antipathy to capitalism"

941

Libidinous

showing excessive sexual drive; lustful.
"libidinous teenagers"

942

Acrid

unpleasantly bitter or pungent.
"acrid smoke"

943

Propound

put forward (an idea or theory) for consideration by others.
"he began to propound the idea of a ‘social monarchy’ as an alternative to Franco"

944

Vade mecum

a handbook or guide that is kept constantly at hand for consultation.
"his book is an excellent vade mecum for writers"

945

Hectoring

talk to (someone) in a bullying way.
"she doesn't hector us about giving up things"

946

Timorous 

showing or suffering from nervousness or a lack of confidence.
"a timorous voice"

947

Genuflection

bending at least one knee to the ground, was from early times a gesture of deep respect for a superior.

948

Joust 

(of a medieval knight) engage in a sporting contest in which two opponents on horseback fight with lances.
"to joust, a man must have an opponent to ride against"

949

Boorish

rough and bad-mannered; coarse.
"boorish behaviour"

950

Iniquitous

grossly unfair and morally wrong. Wickedness
"an iniquitous tax"

951

Moribund

(of a person) at the point of death. In a dying state
"on examination she was moribund and dehydrated"

in the moribund patient deepening stupor and coma are the usual preludes to death

952

Infamy 

the state of being well known for some bad quality or deed.
"a day that will live in infamy"

Disreputableness

953

Providential 

Whether you're talking about God or not, if something is providential, it feels a little miraculous.

the battle was won with the aid of a providential wind

954

Delectation

pleasure and delight.

"they had all manner of rock 'n' roll goodies for our delectation"
Here is some chocolate for your delectation.

955

Vestigial

having attained a simple structure and reduced size and function during the evolution of the species.

the vestigial wings of kiwis are entirely hidden

956

Beneficent

(of a person) generous or doing good. Charitable, generous

"a beneficent landowner"

957

Enamoured of

in love with, taken with, charmed by, fascinated by, entranced by, fond of, enchanted by,

When I was young I was totally enamoured of him.

958

Renegade

a deserter from one faith, cause, or allegiance to another

He was extremely critical of renegade priests

959

Subversive 

seeking or intended to subvert an established system or institution.
"subversive literature"

960

Dullard

a slow or stupid person.
"he was caricatured as a dupe and a dullard"

961

Commodious

roomy, spacious and comfortable.
"they moved to a more commodious dwelling"

962

Effrontery

insolent or impertinent behaviour.
"one juror had the effrontery to challenge the coroner's decision"

963

Lambasted

criticize (someone or something) harshly.
"they lambasted the report as a gross distortion of the truth"

964

Impolitic

Failing to possess or display prudence; unwise.


Of course it might be impolitic to antagonize these groups

965

In thrall to

the state of being in someone's power, or of having great power over someone.
"she was in thrall to her abusive husband"

966

Staunch

very loyal and committed in attitude.
"a staunch supporter of the anti-nuclear lobby"

967

Prima donna

a very temperamental person with an inflated view of their own talent or importance.

We are looking for team players, not prima donnas

968

Unalloyed

Pure, unmixed

the unalloyed happiness that marriage has brought them

969

Damsel

a young unmarried woman.

970

Kleptocracy

a government or state in which those in power exploit national resources and steal; rule by a thief or thieves.

971

Histrionic

excessively theatrical or dramatic in character or style.
"a histrionic outburst"

972

Bowdlerise

remove material that is considered improper or offensive from (a text or account), especially with the result that the text becomes weaker or less effective.
"a bowdlerized version of the story"

973

Impresario

a person who organize, organiser, manager

He is the impresario of our group

974

Sage

a profoundly wise person; a person famed for wisdom.

975

Traduce

speak badly of or tell lies about (someone) so as to damage their reputation.
"it was regarded as respectable political tactics to traduce him"

976

Recluse

a person who lives a solitary life and tends to avoid other people.
"she has turned into a virtual recluse"

977

Idyllic

like an idyll; extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque.
"an attractive hotel in an idyllic setting"

978

Ardour

great enthusiasm or passion.
"the rebuff did little to dampen his ardour"

979

Priapism

condition in which a penis remains erect for hours in the absence of stimulation or after stimulation has ended.

A priapic male

980

Potentate

a monarch or ruler, especially an autocratic one.

981

Somnolence

a state of strong desire for sleep, or sleeping for unusually long periods

he was sitting in a meeting visibly losing his fight against afternoon somnolence

982

Forbearance

patient self-control; restraint and tolerance.
"his unfailing courtesy and forbearance under great provocation"

983

Verve

vigour and spirit or enthusiasm.
"Kollo sings with supreme verve and flexibility"

984

Fisticuffs

fighting with the fists.
"the result was an outbreak of fisticuffs"

985

Dudgeon

a feeling of offence or deep resentment.
"the manager walked out in high dudgeon"

986

Apothecary

a person who prepared and sold medicines and drugs.

987

Brandishing

wave or flourish (something, especially a weapon) as a threat or in anger or excitement.
"a man leaped out brandishing a knife"

988

Embezzlement

theft or misappropriation of funds placed in one's trust or belonging to one's employer.
"charges of fraud and embezzlement"

989

Ectomorphic, mesomorph, endomorph 

Ecto - having a thin body build,

Meso- a person whose build is compact and muscular.

Endo - a person with a soft round build of body and a high proportion of fat tissue.

990

Adversary

one's opponent in a contest, conflict, or dispute.
"Davis beat his old adversary in the quarter-finals"

991

Pyrrhonian skepticism

extreme or absolute skepticism.

992

De novo

starting from the beginning; anew.
"in a pure meritocracy, everyone must begin de novo"

993

Ostracism 

exclusion from a society or group.
"the family suffered social ostracism"

994

Immiseration

the act of making miserable; especially : impoverishment

"rapid modernization had an impact on the level of urban immiseration"

995

indenture

a legal agreement, contract, or document, in particular

Indentured servitude

996

Sprightly

(especially of an old person) lively; full of energy.
"she was quite sprightly for her age"

997

Kick the bucket

die.
"when the old girl finally kicked the bucket there was no mention of yours truly in the will"

998

Ire

anger.
"the plans provoked the ire of conservationists"

999

Prefatory

serving as an introduction; introductory.
"in his prefatory remarks the author claims that …"

1000

Asinine

extremely stupid or foolish.
"Lydia ignored his asinine remark"

1001

Rent seeking

use of the resources of a company, an organization or an individual to obtain economic gain from others without reciprocating any benefits to society through wealth creation. An example of rent-seeking is when a company lobbies the government for loan subsidies, grants or tariff protection.

1002

Gumption

shrewd or spirited initiative and resourcefulness.
"the president would hire almost any young man who had the gumption to ask for a job".

1003

Wherewithal

the money or other means needed for a particular purpose.
"they lacked the wherewithal to pay"

1004

Recoil

to shrink back physically or emotionally

We recoiled in horror at the sight of his wounded arm.

1005

Doted

be extremely and uncritically fond of.
"she doted on her two young children"

1006

Usufruct

the legal right of using and enjoying the fruits or profits of something belonging to another

The Turks have no proprietary rights; they merely enjoy the usufruct of their possessions.

1007

Antiquated

old-fashioned or outdated.
"this antiquated central heating system"

1008

Chaperone

accompany and look after or supervise.
"she chaperoned the children at all times"

1009

Luminaries

a person who inspires or influences others, especially one prominent in a particular sphere.
"one of the luminaries of child psychiatry"

1010

Amorous

showing, feeling, or relating to sexual desire.
"she rejected his amorous advances"

1011

Strumpet

a female prostitute or a promiscuous woman.

1012

Ex gratia

(with reference to payment) done from a sense of moral obligation rather than because of any legal requirement.
"an ex gratia payment"

1013

Testicular fortitude

Balls

1014

Cohere

(of an argument or theory) be logically consistent.
"this view does not cohere with their other beliefs"

1015

Alliaceous 

relating to or denoting plants of a group that comprises the onions and other alliums.

1016

Elocution 

the skill of clear and expressive speech, especially of distinct pronunciation and articulation.
"lessons in singing and elocution"

1017

Neuralgic 

sharp and paroxysmal pain along the course of a nerve.

1018

Dearth

a scarcity or lack of something.
"there is a dearth of evidence"

1019

Salad days

the period when one is young and inexperienced.
"the war seemed to be ending and so were my salad days"

1020

Menagerie

a place where animals are kept and trained especially for exhibition

a menagerie of rare creatures

1021

Contemporaneous 

existing at or occurring in the same period of time.
"Pythagoras was contemporaneous with Buddha"

1022

Feline 

a cat or other member of the cat family.

1023

Extemporaneous

composed, performed, or uttered on the spur of the moment : impromptu an extemporaneous comment

1024

Levity

the treatment of a serious matter with humour or lack of due respect. Light-heartedness

"as an attempt to introduce a note of levity, the words were a disastrous flop"

1025

Unvarnished

(of a statement or manner) plain and straightforward.
"please tell me the unvarnished truth"

1026

Maelstrom 

a situation or state of confused movement or violent turmoil.
"the train station was a maelstrom of crowds"

1027

Pithy

(of language or style) terse and vigorously expressive.
"his characteristically pithy comments"

1028

Gaudy

extravagantly bright or showy, typically so as to be tasteless.
"silver bows and gaudy ribbons"

1029

Self referential

Making reference to itself or oneself.

self-referential elements in Donne's poems

1030

Dalliance

a casual romantic or sexual relationship.
"Jack was not averse to an occasional dalliance with a pretty girl"

1031

Doggerel

verse or words that are badly written or expressed.
"the last stanza deteriorates into doggerel"

1032

Litany

a usually lengthy recitation or enumeration a familiar litany of complaints

1033

Clamorous 

making a loud and confused noise.
"a jostling, clamorous mob"

1034

Irksome 

irritating; annoying.
"an irksome journey"

1035

Orotund

(of a person's voice) resonant and imposing.; deep, sonorous

When more emotion was needed, the volume was turned up, or the elocution became more orotund.

1036

Overslaugh

pass over (someone) in favour of another.
"during the war officers were often overslaughed"

1037

Assimilationist 

a person who advocates or participates in racial or cultural integration.
"the assimilationist policies of the right"

1038

Conflate

combine (two or more sets of information, texts, ideas, etc.) into one.
"the urban crisis conflates a number of different economic, political, and social issues"

1039

Alma mater

the university, school, or college that one formerly attended.
"he started teaching at his alma mater"

1040

Dignitary 

a person considered to be important because of high rank or office.
"the guests included former shareholders, local dignitaries, and many of the people directly involved with the project"

1041

Discordant

disagreeing or incongruous.
"the operative principle of democracy is a balance of discordant qualities"

1042

Surmise 

suppose that something is true without having evidence to confirm it.
"he surmised that something must be wrong"

1043

Askew

not in a straight or level position.
"her hat was slightly askew"

1044

Stolid

calm, dependable, and showing little emotion or animation.
"a stolid bourgeois gent"

1045

Cognoscenti 

people who are especially well informed about a particular subject.
"it's worth taking a tip from the fashion cognoscenti"

1046

Coterie 

a small group of people with shared interests or tastes, especially one that is exclusive of other people.
"a coterie of friends and advisers"

1047

Plaintive 

sounding sad and mournful.
"a plaintive cry"

1048

Bestial

of or like an animal or animals.
"Darwin's revelations about our bestial beginnings"

1049

Mutatis mutandis

(used when comparing two or more cases or situations) making necessary alterations while not affecting the main point at issue.
"what is true of undergraduate teaching in England is equally true, mutatis mutandis, of American graduate schools"

1050

De omnibus dubitandum

everything must be doubted

1051

Curmudgeon

a bad-tempered or surly person.

We were in Edinburgh visiting the in-laws. I was, as usual, being a grumpy old curmudgeon. My people don't travel well.

1052

Festoon

adorn (a place) with chains, garlands, or other decorations.
"the staffroom was festooned with balloons and streamers"

1053

Obtuse

annoyingly insensitive or slow to understand.
"he wondered if the doctor was being deliberately obtuse"

1054

Gluttony

habitual greed or excess in eating.
"she said plumpness was a sign of gluttony in most cases"

1055

Fractious

(of a group or organization) difficult to control; unruly.
"King Malcolm struggled to unite his fractious kingdom"

1056

Demure

(of a woman or her behaviour) reserved, modest, and shy.
"a demure little wife who sits at home minding the house"

1057

Debase

reduce (something) in quality or value; degrade.
"the love episodes debase the dignity of the drama"

1058

Ablution 

an act of washing oneself.
"the women performed their ablutions"

1059

Inured

accustom (someone) to something, especially something unpleasant.
"these children have been inured to violence"

1060

Comportment

behaviour; bearing.
"he displayed precisely the comportment expected of the rightful king"

1061

Slovenly 

(especially of a person or their appearance) untidy and dirty.
"a fat, slovenly ex-rock star"

1062

Sinecure

a position requiring little or no work but giving the holder status or financial benefit.
"political sinecures for the supporters of ministers"

1063

Teutonic 

of or relating to Germans, GErmanic

1064

Effusive

showing or expressing gratitude, pleasure, or approval in an unrestrained or heartfelt manner.
"an effusive welcome"

1065

Protégé 

a person who is guided and supported by an older and more experienced or influential person.
"Ruskin submitted his protégé's name for election"

1066

Philistine 

a person who is guided by materialism and is usually disdainful of intellectual or artistic values

1067

Larded with

to contain a lot of something that is not wanted or necessary
His autobiography is larded with gossip about famous people.

1068

Lagniappe

something given as a bonus or gratuity.

The waiter added a cup of lobster bisque as a lagniappe to the meal.

1069

Demur

raise objections or show reluctance.
"normally she would have accepted the challenge, but she demurred"

1070

Heuristic

enabling a person to discover or learn something for themselves.
"a ‘hands-on’ or interactive heuristic approach to learning"

1071

Dilettante

A dilettante is an amateur, often one who pretends to be very knowledgeable.

"I finally feel like I can call myself a writer now, rather than writing being just something I do on the side, as a dilettante."

1072

Segue

to make a transition without interruption from one activity, topic, scene, or part to another

segued smoothly into the next story

1073

Congenital

(of a disease or physical abnormality) present from birth.
"a congenital malformation of the heart"

1074

Magniloquent

speaking or expressed in a lofty or grandiose style; pompous; bombastic; boastful.

He has rather too magniloquent a style both of acting and singing, but is a very agreeable artist.

1075

Decry

publicly denounce.
"they decried human rights abuses"
In her article, she decries the pollution of the environment by manufacturers.

1076

Parthenogenesis

development of an egg without fertilization

Christian's claim that Mary somehow achieved human parthenogenesis

1077

Miscreant


a person who has done something wrong or unlawful.
"the police are straining every nerve to bring the miscreants to justice"

1078

Tawdry 

showy but cheap and of poor quality.
"tawdry jewellery"

1079

Nimble

quick and light in movement or action; agile.
"with a deft motion of her nimble fingers"

1080

Astroturfing

the deceptive practice of presenting an orchestrated marketing or public relations campaign in the guise of unsolicited comments from members of the public.

such claims of astroturfing, the practice of using money and outside support to create an illusion of grassroots enthusiasm, are not unheard of in the political sphere.

1081

Magnate

a wealthy and influential businessman or businesswoman.
"a property magnate"

1082

Peddler

a) one who offers merchandise (such as fresh produce) for sale along the street or from door to door
b) a person who tries to promote some cause, candidate, viewpoint, etc.

a peddler of New Age philosophies

1083

Rote

mechanical or habitual repetition of something to be learned.
"a poem learnt by rote in childhood"

1084

Scrofulous 

morally contaminated
scrofulous characters … so quick to smear

1085

Virility

(in a man) the quality of having strength, energy, and a strong sex drive; manliness.
"great importance is placed on a man's virility"

1086

Virility

(in a man) the quality of having strength, energy, and a strong sex drive; manliness.
"great importance is placed on a man's virility"

1087

Vivisection 

the practice of performing operations on live animals for the purpose of experimentation or scientific research (used only by opponents of such work).
"the abolition of vivisection"

1088

Prudish

having or revealing a tendency to be easily shocked by matters relating to sex or nudity; excessively concerned with sexual propriety.
"the prudish moral climate of the late 19th century"

1089

Tendrils 

a slender thread-like appendage of a climbing plant, often growing in a spiral form, which stretches out and twines round any suitable support.

1090

Frisson

a sudden strong feeling of excitement or fear; a thrill.
"a frisson of excitement"

The movie offers the viewer the occasional frisson of seeing a character in mortal danger

1091

Fawn over

to praise someone too much and give them a lot of attention that is not sincere, in order to get a positive reaction:
I hate waiters who fawn over you.

1092

Primordial soup

a solution rich in organic compounds in the primitive oceans of the earth, from which life is thought to have originated.

1093

Recuse

excuse oneself from a case because of a potential conflict of interest or lack of impartiality.
"it was the right of counsel to ask a judge to recuse himself from continuing to hear a case because of bias"

1094

Floridly 

very flowery in style : ornate florid prose

1095

Plebiscite

the direct vote of all the members of an electorate on an important public question such as a change in the constitution.
"the administration will hold a plebiscite for the approval of constitutional reforms"

1096

Wayward

difficult to control or predict because of wilful or perverse behaviour.
"a wayward adolescent"

1097

Profundities

great depth of insight or knowledge.
"the simplicity and profundity of the message"

1098

Canard

an unfounded rumour or story.
"the old canard that LA is a cultural wasteland"

1099

Risible

provoking laughter through being ludicrous.
the suggestion was downright risible

1100

Antediluvian-

Ridiculously old-fashioned.
‘they maintain antediluvian sex-role stereotypes’

1101

Alfresco

in the open air.
"an al fresco supper"

Alfresco bordello

1102

Delectable 

delicious:
a delectable dinner.

1103

discotheque

the full name of disco

1104

hermeneutics

the branch of knowledge that deals with interpretation, especially of the Bible or literary texts.

1105

Exegesis

critical explanation or interpretation of a text, especially of scripture.
"the task of biblical exegesis"

1106

Erstwhile

former.
"the erstwhile president of the company"

1107

Malodorous 

smelling very unpleasant.
"leaking taps and malodorous drains"

1108

valiant

possessing or showing courage or determination.
"she made a valiant effort to hold her anger in check"

1109

Sine qua non

something absolutely indispensable or essential reliability is a sine qua non for success

1110

Confabulation 

the replacement of a gap in a person's memory by a falsification that he or she believes to be true.

Critics later dissected her story, deeming her condition a mishmash of confabulations, or false memories.

1111

Ratiocination

the process of exact thinking : reasoning

nothing could be more antipathetic to