Vocabulary 6 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Vocabulary 6 Deck (100):
1

v. wrap (someone, esp. a baby) in garments or cloth

His assistant, a silent young woman whose face was swaddled in a double scarf, like a nun with a wimple, took notes.

Q image thumb

swaddle
/ˈswädl/

2

n. headdress of cloth; worn over the head and around the neck and ears by medieval women

His assistant, a silent young woman whose face was swaddled in a double scarf, like a nun with a wimple, took notes.

Q image thumb

wimple1
/ˈwimpəl/

3

v.  to ripple or cause to ripple or undulate

You could see them standing in the amber current where the white edges of their fins wimpled softly in the flow.

wimple2
/ˈwimpəl/

4

adj. 1.bearing wavy, wormlike lines. 2. having a wormlike motion; twisting or wriggling. 3. sinuous; tortuous (full of twists, turns, bends)

On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming.

vermiculate
/vərˈmɪk yəˌleɪt/ 

A image thumb
5

adj. in abundance

One of the state's classiest lodges, offering fine dining and activities galore.

galore
/gəˈlôr/

6

pv. back away from the line of scrimmage; take position in the rear

Mara and I drop back to give Fincher some privacy—though we can still hear snippets of his conversation.

drop back

7

adj. deliberately impassive or expressionless
v. say something amusing while affecting a serious manner

I think they are talking about my boobs right now,” she says with deadpan resignation.  

deadpan
/ˈdedˌpan/

8

n. the acceptance of something undesirable but inevitable

The activists from Africa shrugged with resignation and sank back down on the benches. 

 

resignation
/ˌrezigˈnāSHən/

9

adj. denoting something happening quickly or ucontrollably;  done easily; out of control or rampant (unrestrained; unchecked)

1. Swedish writer Stieg Larsson's novel of the same title, published posthumously in 2005, may well be the unlikeliest runaway best-seller in publishing history. 2. a runaway victory. 3. runaway inflation

runaway
/ˈrənəˌwā/

10

1. biting, sharp and forthright, as in character or expression:  2.tasting sour or bitter

Few of the cabinet were immune from Margaret Thatcher's acerbic handwritten notes.

acerbic
/əˈsərbik/

11

adj. 1. extremely fast, forceful, or impressive. 2. intensely hot. 3. (of criticism) harsh; severe.

The Social Network opens with five minutes and 22 seconds of blistering dialogue. 2. blistering heat. 3. blistering criticism.

blistering
/ˈblistəriNG/

12

n. 1. an evil spirit said to rob graves and feed on dead bodies. 2. a person morbidly interested in death and disaster (macabre things)

Although she stands out among the sea of blond giants like a tiny chic ghoul, no one gives her a second glance.

ghoul
/go͞ol/

13

n.  a person who opposes or rejects popular opinion, esp. in stock exchange dealing

I am a contrarian by nature, so all it does is make me want to take real risks. 

contrarian
/kənˈtre(ə)rēən/ 

14

v. assign to a particular category or class, esp. in a manner that is too rigid or exclusive

it seems more accurate to pigeonhole her as a director who combines thoroughgoing, even steely, self-confidence with a reticent, no-frills conversational style.

pigeonhole
/ˈpijənˌhōl/

15

adj. tending to talk a great deal; talkative

Unlike loquacious cineastes such as Orson Welles or her own illustrious father (Francis Ford), Coppola is nearly as laconic as Johnny Marco, the actor protagonist of Somewhere.

loquacious
/lōˈkwāSHəs/

16

n. 1. a filmmaker. 2. an enthusiast for or devotee of movies or filmmaking

Unlike loquacious cineastes such as Orson Welles or her own illustrious father (Francis Ford), Coppola is nearly as laconic as Johnny Marco, the actor protagonist of Somewhere.

cineast
/ˈsinēˌast/

17

v. 1.provide someone with (food or drink) in a continuous or insistent way. 2. direct (numerous questions) at someone

John Ford, who were known to chew out admiring interviewers when plied with overly intellectual questions.

ply
/plī/

18

v. raise objections or show reluctance

When asked if these personal attacks upset her, Coppola demurred and claimed, "No, I'm just glad we won the Golden Lion.

demur
/diˈmər/

19

n. 老麵糰
v. 1.to add leaven to (dough or batter) and cause to rise. 2.to pervade with a lightening, enlivening, or modifying influence

If the downbeat premise appeared somewhat uncommercial by Hollywood standards, Coppola leavened the gloom with a bit of welcome slapstick and muted romance.

leaven
/ˈlevən/

20

n. 1. a range of food, esp. of a particular type. 2. performance or entertainment of a particular style

Do you feel like there’s a dearth of quality fare focused on teenage characters?

 

fare
/fer/

 

21

v.  to float (or cause to go) gently through the air or over water
n. a light breeze; something (a scent or odor), such as a perfume, that is carried through the air

The burlesque superstar wafted down the red carpet in New York City wearing a champagne-colored, silk Maria Lucia Hohan gown complete with gold piping and seksi illusion back.

waft
/wäft/

22

idiom. to include everything within a group or type.

His other projects run the gamut from 2D and 3D poster design, to video, photography and even typography design

run the gamut

23

adj. lacking distinctive or interesting features or characteristics

The nondescript rolls tasted commercial, as did a so-so dessert called chocolate rhapsody.

nondescript
/ˌnändəˈskript/

24

n. 1. a remark that is not directly related to the main topic of discussion. 2. a remark that someone makes in a quiet voice because they do not want everyone to hear it

The papers are not bereft of whimsy, but it is confined to footnotes and asides.離題話/悄悄話,私語

aside
/əˈsīd/

25

adj. of or relating to dreams or dreaming

She is as out of time and place as she ought to be, perfectly expressing the oneiric atmosphere of Carroll's stories.

oneiric
/ōˈnīrik/

26

v. prevent (something considered wrong or undesirable) from succeeding

Many things that seem predictable over the long run foil our best-laid plans in the meanwhile.

foil
/foil/

27

v. subject (a place, text, etc.) to a thorough search in order to locate something

drop his family off on a nearby aircraft carrier so he can scour multiple countries in the hopes of finding a cure.

scour
/skou(ə)r/

28

v. expend or use less time, money, or material on something than is necessary in an attempt to economize

Lots of otherwise talented artists tend to skimp on research, especially when on a deadline. 偷工減料

skimp
/skimp/

29

v. search through something in a hurried way in order to find or steal something

Almost every day, on my lunch hour, I'd rifle through their shelves "reading" the pictures panel bu panel.

rifle
/ˈrīfəl/

30

v. gratify or indulge (an immoral or distasteful desire, need, or habit or a person with such a desire, etc.)

The determination to hold up a mirror to life's face and resist pandering or selling out.

 

pander
/ˈpandər/

31

n. money obtained from an event or activity

A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Galatia food brigade, helping us feed our hungry neighbors.

proceeds
/ˈprōˌsēdz/

32

adj. 1. [from latin, to burn] able to burn or corrode organic tissue by chemical action. 2. sarcastic in a scathing and bitter way

Dean Baker, a caustic economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research”

 

caustic
/ˈkôstik/

33

a. calm, dignified, and unhurried.
b. sedate, respectable, and unadventurous

An Economist reporter known for its staid prose.

 

staid /stād/
sedate /siˈdāt/

34

(usu plural) n. 1. a divine token; a favorable sign or propitious circumstance. 2. (under the auspices) patronage, support, protection

But how did the ratings agencies' models, which had all the auspices of scientific precision, do such a poor job of describing reality?

auspice
/ˈôspis/

35

v. 1. pour a liquid over; drench. 2. immerse briefly into a liquid so as to wet, coat, or saturate. 3. put out (a fire or light)

Wet the loofah with warm water and douse it with the soap product of your choice.

douse
/dous/

36

n. stopper for closing a hole in a container
v.  close with a stopper; (bung up) block (something), typically by overfilling it

A sow (adult female pig, esp a farrowed one) is seen knocking the bung from a barrel so that the ale runs to waste.

bung
/bəNG/

37

n. a litter of pigs
v. (of a sow) give birth to (piglets)

A sow  is an adult female pig, esp a farrowed one.

farrow
/ˈfarō/

38

v. to hold off; to keep something away; to avert or prevent sth undesirable from happening

They simply could not think of any other way to stave off a speculative crisis. 

stave sb/sth off

39

n. 1. vertical wooden planks (or posts), attached side by side to make a barrel or in a building or other structure.

Q image thumb

stave
/stāv/

A image thumb
40

v. 1. attach a draft animal to (something) by a harness. 2. control and make use of (natural resources), esp. to produce energy

1. the American painter recorded the nocturnal excavations for Pennsylvania Station using a bravura painting technique harnessed to an intelligence. 2. harnessing the creativity of graduates

harness
/ˈhärnis/

41

n. great technical skill and brilliance shown in a performance or activity

the American painter recorded the nocturnal excavations for Pennsylvania Station using a bravura painting technique harnessed to an intelligence.

bravura
/brəˈv(y)o͞orə/

42

v. walk slowly and with heavy steps, typically because of exhaustion or harsh conditions

Wouldn't a crowd at a football match be a more raucous and energised than the miserable procession of sad people trudging into the stadium he shows here?

Q image thumb

trudge
/trəj/

43

v. (esp. of a chimney) send (smoke or flames) out or up;大聲打嗝

a certain urban landscape will be evoked: factory walls, belching chimneys, looming mills.

belch
/belCH/

44

n. 1. a block of row houses; a rowhouse. 2. each of a series of flat areas made on a slope, used for cultivation

all trace of the red-brick terraces, the mills, the soot-blackened gothic churches seems to have been erased.

Q image thumb

terrace
/ˈteris/

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45

n. one who abstains completely from alcoholic beverages

a rent-collector by day and an artist by night, a lifelong Tory voter and teetotaller.

teetotaller

46

v. 1. (vt) make narrower, esp. by encircling pressure; (vi) become narrower. 2. restrict

1. constricted air passages; the chemicals constrict the blood vessel. 2. a naive outsider, whose relentlessly repetitive work hints at an intellectual and emotional constriction, an Asperger's-like precocity.

constrict
/kənˈstrikt/

47

1. v. impossible to stop or prevent. 2. (of a person) impossible to persuade by request or entreaty

1. Instead, housing prices continued their inexorable decline, falling a further 20 percent during 2008. 2. the doctors were inexorable.

inexorable
/inˈeksərəbəl/

48

v. to assert that you know from experience that something is true or good, or that someone is honest and has a good character

now imagine that the stranger selling you the car has someone else to vouch for him. 替..背書

vouch for sth/sb
/vouCH/

49

n. A device that automatically regulates temperature, or that activates a device when the temperature reaches a certain point 自動調溫

negative feedbacks behaves as a sort of thermostat that prevents the economy from going into recession or becoming overheated.

thermostat
/ˈTHərməˌstat/

50

n. 1. a concentrated artillery bombardment over a wide area. 2. a concentrated outpouring, as of questions or blows

The barrage of terminology and minutiae in this hour meeting is mind-boggling. 

barrage
/bəˈräZH/

51

swaddle
/ˈswädl/

v. wrap (someone, esp. a baby) in garments or cloth

His assistant, a silent young woman whose face was swaddled in a double scarf, like a nun with a wimple, took notes.

A image thumb
52

wimple1
/ˈwimpəl/

n. headdress of cloth; worn over the head and around the neck and ears by medieval women

His assistant, a silent young woman whose face was swaddled in a double scarf, like a nun with a wimple, took notes.

A image thumb
53

wimple2
/ˈwimpəl/

v.  to ripple or cause to ripple or undulate

You could see them standing in the amber current where the white edges of their fins wimpled softly in the flow.

54

vermiculate
/vərˈmɪk yəˌleɪt/ 

Q image thumb

adj. 1.bearing wavy, wormlike lines. 2. having a wormlike motion; twisting or wriggling. 3. sinuous; tortuous (full of twists, turns, bends)

On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming.

55

galore
/gəˈlôr/

adj. in abundance

One of the state's classiest lodges, offering fine dining and activities galore.

56

drop back

pv. back away from the line of scrimmage; take position in the rear

Mara and I drop back to give Fincher some privacy—though we can still hear snippets of his conversation.

57

deadpan
/ˈdedˌpan/

adj. deliberately impassive or expressionless
v. say something amusing while affecting a serious manner

I think they are talking about my boobs right now,” she says with deadpan resignation.  

58

resignation
/ˌrezigˈnāSHən/

n. the acceptance of something undesirable but inevitable

The activists from Africa shrugged with resignation and sank back down on the benches. 

 

59

runaway
/ˈrənəˌwā/

adj. denoting something happening quickly or ucontrollably;  done easily; out of control or rampant (unrestrained; unchecked)

1. Swedish writer Stieg Larsson's novel of the same title, published posthumously in 2005, may well be the unlikeliest runaway best-seller in publishing history. 2. a runaway victory. 3. runaway inflation

60

acerbic
/əˈsərbik/

1. biting, sharp and forthright, as in character or expression:  2.tasting sour or bitter

Few of the cabinet were immune from Margaret Thatcher's acerbic handwritten notes.

61

blistering
/ˈblistəriNG/

adj. 1. extremely fast, forceful, or impressive. 2. intensely hot. 3. (of criticism) harsh; severe.

The Social Network opens with five minutes and 22 seconds of blistering dialogue. 2. blistering heat. 3. blistering criticism.

62

ghoul
/go͞ol/

n. 1. an evil spirit said to rob graves and feed on dead bodies. 2. a person morbidly interested in death and disaster (macabre things)

Although she stands out among the sea of blond giants like a tiny chic ghoul, no one gives her a second glance.

63

contrarian
/kənˈtre(ə)rēən/ 

n.  a person who opposes or rejects popular opinion, esp. in stock exchange dealing

I am a contrarian by nature, so all it does is make me want to take real risks. 

64

pigeonhole
/ˈpijənˌhōl/

v. assign to a particular category or class, esp. in a manner that is too rigid or exclusive

it seems more accurate to pigeonhole her as a director who combines thoroughgoing, even steely, self-confidence with a reticent, no-frills conversational style.

65

loquacious
/lōˈkwāSHəs/

adj. tending to talk a great deal; talkative

Unlike loquacious cineastes such as Orson Welles or her own illustrious father (Francis Ford), Coppola is nearly as laconic as Johnny Marco, the actor protagonist of Somewhere.

66

cineast
/ˈsinēˌast/

n. 1. a filmmaker. 2. an enthusiast for or devotee of movies or filmmaking

Unlike loquacious cineastes such as Orson Welles or her own illustrious father (Francis Ford), Coppola is nearly as laconic as Johnny Marco, the actor protagonist of Somewhere.

67

ply
/plī/

v. 1.provide someone with (food or drink) in a continuous or insistent way. 2. direct (numerous questions) at someone

John Ford, who were known to chew out admiring interviewers when plied with overly intellectual questions.

68

demur
/diˈmər/

v. raise objections or show reluctance

When asked if these personal attacks upset her, Coppola demurred and claimed, "No, I'm just glad we won the Golden Lion.

69

leaven
/ˈlevən/

n. 老麵糰
v. 1.to add leaven to (dough or batter) and cause to rise. 2.to pervade with a lightening, enlivening, or modifying influence

If the downbeat premise appeared somewhat uncommercial by Hollywood standards, Coppola leavened the gloom with a bit of welcome slapstick and muted romance.

70

fare
/fer/

 

n. 1. a range of food, esp. of a particular type. 2. performance or entertainment of a particular style

Do you feel like there’s a dearth of quality fare focused on teenage characters?

 

71

waft
/wäft/

v.  to float (or cause to go) gently through the air or over water
n. a light breeze; something (a scent or odor), such as a perfume, that is carried through the air

The burlesque superstar wafted down the red carpet in New York City wearing a champagne-colored, silk Maria Lucia Hohan gown complete with gold piping and seksi illusion back.

72

run the gamut

idiom. to include everything within a group or type.

His other projects run the gamut from 2D and 3D poster design, to video, photography and even typography design

73

nondescript
/ˌnändəˈskript/

adj. lacking distinctive or interesting features or characteristics

The nondescript rolls tasted commercial, as did a so-so dessert called chocolate rhapsody.

74

aside
/əˈsīd/

n. 1. a remark that is not directly related to the main topic of discussion. 2. a remark that someone makes in a quiet voice because they do not want everyone to hear it

The papers are not bereft of whimsy, but it is confined to footnotes and asides.離題話/悄悄話,私語

75

oneiric
/ōˈnīrik/

adj. of or relating to dreams or dreaming

She is as out of time and place as she ought to be, perfectly expressing the oneiric atmosphere of Carroll's stories.

76

foil
/foil/

v. prevent (something considered wrong or undesirable) from succeeding

Many things that seem predictable over the long run foil our best-laid plans in the meanwhile.

77

scour
/skou(ə)r/

v. subject (a place, text, etc.) to a thorough search in order to locate something

drop his family off on a nearby aircraft carrier so he can scour multiple countries in the hopes of finding a cure.

78

skimp
/skimp/

v. expend or use less time, money, or material on something than is necessary in an attempt to economize

Lots of otherwise talented artists tend to skimp on research, especially when on a deadline. 偷工減料

79

rifle
/ˈrīfəl/

v. search through something in a hurried way in order to find or steal something

Almost every day, on my lunch hour, I'd rifle through their shelves "reading" the pictures panel bu panel.

80

pander
/ˈpandər/

v. gratify or indulge (an immoral or distasteful desire, need, or habit or a person with such a desire, etc.)

The determination to hold up a mirror to life's face and resist pandering or selling out.

 

81

proceeds
/ˈprōˌsēdz/

n. money obtained from an event or activity

A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Galatia food brigade, helping us feed our hungry neighbors.

82

caustic
/ˈkôstik/

adj. 1. [from latin, to burn] able to burn or corrode organic tissue by chemical action. 2. sarcastic in a scathing and bitter way

Dean Baker, a caustic economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research”

 

83

staid /stād/
sedate /siˈdāt/

a. calm, dignified, and unhurried.
b. sedate, respectable, and unadventurous

An Economist reporter known for its staid prose.

 

84

auspice
/ˈôspis/

(usu plural) n. 1. a divine token; a favorable sign or propitious circumstance. 2. (under the auspices) patronage, support, protection

But how did the ratings agencies' models, which had all the auspices of scientific precision, do such a poor job of describing reality?

85

douse
/dous/

v. 1. pour a liquid over; drench. 2. immerse briefly into a liquid so as to wet, coat, or saturate. 3. put out (a fire or light)

Wet the loofah with warm water and douse it with the soap product of your choice.

86

bung
/bəNG/

n. stopper for closing a hole in a container
v.  close with a stopper; (bung up) block (something), typically by overfilling it

A sow (adult female pig, esp a farrowed one) is seen knocking the bung from a barrel so that the ale runs to waste.

87

farrow
/ˈfarō/

n. a litter of pigs
v. (of a sow) give birth to (piglets)

A sow  is an adult female pig, esp a farrowed one.

88

stave sb/sth off

v. to hold off; to keep something away; to avert or prevent sth undesirable from happening

They simply could not think of any other way to stave off a speculative crisis. 

89

stave
/stāv/

Q image thumb

n. 1. vertical wooden planks (or posts), attached side by side to make a barrel or in a building or other structure.

A image thumb
90

harness
/ˈhärnis/

v. 1. attach a draft animal to (something) by a harness. 2. control and make use of (natural resources), esp. to produce energy

1. the American painter recorded the nocturnal excavations for Pennsylvania Station using a bravura painting technique harnessed to an intelligence. 2. harnessing the creativity of graduates

91

bravura
/brəˈv(y)o͞orə/

n. great technical skill and brilliance shown in a performance or activity

the American painter recorded the nocturnal excavations for Pennsylvania Station using a bravura painting technique harnessed to an intelligence.

92

trudge
/trəj/

v. walk slowly and with heavy steps, typically because of exhaustion or harsh conditions

Wouldn't a crowd at a football match be a more raucous and energised than the miserable procession of sad people trudging into the stadium he shows here?

A image thumb
93

belch
/belCH/

v. (esp. of a chimney) send (smoke or flames) out or up;大聲打嗝

a certain urban landscape will be evoked: factory walls, belching chimneys, looming mills.

94

terrace
/ˈteris/

Q image thumb

n. 1. a block of row houses; a rowhouse. 2. each of a series of flat areas made on a slope, used for cultivation

all trace of the red-brick terraces, the mills, the soot-blackened gothic churches seems to have been erased.

A image thumb
95

teetotaller

n. one who abstains completely from alcoholic beverages

a rent-collector by day and an artist by night, a lifelong Tory voter and teetotaller.

96

constrict
/kənˈstrikt/

v. 1. (vt) make narrower, esp. by encircling pressure; (vi) become narrower. 2. restrict

1. constricted air passages; the chemicals constrict the blood vessel. 2. a naive outsider, whose relentlessly repetitive work hints at an intellectual and emotional constriction, an Asperger's-like precocity.

97

inexorable
/inˈeksərəbəl/

1. v. impossible to stop or prevent. 2. (of a person) impossible to persuade by request or entreaty

1. Instead, housing prices continued their inexorable decline, falling a further 20 percent during 2008. 2. the doctors were inexorable.

98

vouch for sth/sb
/vouCH/

v. to assert that you know from experience that something is true or good, or that someone is honest and has a good character

now imagine that the stranger selling you the car has someone else to vouch for him. 替..背書

99

thermostat
/ˈTHərməˌstat/

n. A device that automatically regulates temperature, or that activates a device when the temperature reaches a certain point 自動調溫

negative feedbacks behaves as a sort of thermostat that prevents the economy from going into recession or becoming overheated.

100

barrage
/bəˈräZH/

n. 1. a concentrated artillery bombardment over a wide area. 2. a concentrated outpouring, as of questions or blows

The barrage of terminology and minutiae in this hour meeting is mind-boggling.