Week 4 - Dance Musicals+Auteurs: The 50’s & 60’s - part 1. Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Week 4 - Dance Musicals+Auteurs: The 50’s & 60’s - part 1. Deck (105):
1

Dance has been w/ us since

The beginning of film

2

Fred Astaire dancing since

Youth as a vaudeville star

3

TOP HAT was made during

Mid-depression (35)

4

When TOP HAT came out why were people going to films?

To escape/be transported

5

Astaire movies plots always

romance stories b/w Fred & Ginger Rogers

6

Bus Stop Song

Isn't it a lovely Day? Raining

7

Astaire & choreo/filmmaking

Did his own choreo, was a stickler for long/uncut dances & full bodies shown

8

Fred Astaire's career in film was

loooong

9

West Side Story reception

SUCCESS, won 10 Oscars

10

50's/60's ________ the ______ was most in charge

auteurs, director was most in charge

11

Auteur model different from

Hollywood models

12

50's & 60's saw the return of

European Cinema

13

Cinema Verite is shooting ________

live "as it happens"

14

French New Wave staples

-Cinema Verite
-Jump Cuts

15

The 7th Seal Takes place during

Black Plague Europe

16

7th Seal Director

Ingmar Bergman

17

Scene in 7th seal similar to joan

young witch burning, except opposite of god b/c it is satanic

18

witch in 7th seal is ______ of death

pitiful/terrified, not brave like joan

19

Throughout movie ______ follows as ______ plays a member of each community

Death follows as plague plays a member of each community

20

Throne of Blood by

Kurosawa

21

Kurosawa was a __________

MAJOR auteur

22

Throne of Blood is interpretation of

Macbeth

23

Throne of Blood took place in

Futule Japan

24

Not Japanese translation of Macbeth but

rendition w/ it's own culture

25

Kurosawa lenses

telephoto/zooming lenses

26

what effect did lenses have on film?

flattened space like compressed Japanese prints, everything in focus

27

Throne of Blood metaphorical setting

Forest Maze symbolic w/ mind and dream space

28

Kurosawa non-human characters

Mystical beings and witches

29

Throne of Blood put more power in ____ than in ____

visuals than in words

30

Kurosawa borrows from _______

Noh theater, relying heavily on stylized symbolic gestures & mask like faces

31

Ex. of Kurosawa sound

Bird cry to tell story

32

Lady MacBeth asks & Kurosawa sound

How did you interpret that bird's cry? Uses it to convince husband

33

Evil deed in Throne of Blood, how is it filmed?

It is done off camera, and we see Lady Macbeth waiting

34

Sound also musically used to express

murder

35

Last scene of throne of blood

Trees of the forest come to attack

36

Breathless by

Godard

37

Breathless about

Charming petty criminal

38

You could only see EuroCin like Breathless in

Arthouses/special theaters

39

Breathless almost all _____ w/ lots of ______

handheld, lots of jump cuts

40

Godard wants to _______ audience _____

wants to remind audience it is a movie/unsuture you

41

Who turns in main character of Breathless?

American love interest in France, for $$

42

Last Year at Mareinbad a portrait of...

Portrait of Hell? Limbo? Dreamspace?

43

We know LY@M certainly is ______

not real

44

There is a lot of ______ in LY@M, ex.

Repetition, guy playing the game who always wins

45

LY@M themes

circular themes

46

LY@M main man & <3 triangle

Man continuously trying to convince wife of other man that he knows her and is in relationship with her, at end of the film he doesn't even seem convinced

47



The Black Death, or the Black Plague, was

one of the deadliest pandemics in human history
total number of deaths worldwide is estimated at 75 million people

48

Title of 7th Seal

The Seventh Seal: quote used for the title

"And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour." [Bible, New Testament]

49

main character in 7th seal

Antonius, a knight in search of the meaning of life is set in 14th-century Sweden

50

Knight in 7th Seal

A knight (Max von Sydow), tormented and doubting, returns from 10 wasted years in the Crusades, and Death (Bengt Ekerot) comes to claim him.

51

Knight & death

Hoping to gain some revelation or obtain some knowledge before he dies, the knight challenges Death to a game of chess.

52

End of 7th Seal

knight tricks Death in order to save a family of strolling players—a visionary, innocent, natural man, Joseph (Nils Poppe), his wife (Bibi Andersson), and their infant son.

53

The knight and his squire

The knight, a sane modern man, asking to believe despite all the evidence of his senses, is childlike compared with his carnal atheist squire (Gunnar Björnstrand).

54

Antonius & Squire after crusades, come to find

returning home from the Crusades to find a world crumbling under the grip of the Plague

55

The chess game & God

As the game is played out the grim reality of a disease-ridden world, where religious fervor is rife whilst God seems clearly absent becomes apparent.

56

What does the 7th Seal question?

questions the absence of God during a time when Christianity’s stronghold on a continent waned.

57

Filmmaking in 7th Seal

Cinematographical masterpiece

58

What's ironic about this period and biblical references in 7th seal?

As the Biblical-reference title suggests, the film takes place in a situation where the day of judgement seems to be at hand

59

Parallels of 7th Seal & Modern Times

for cold-war parallels with the late 1950s when the world was facing up to the prospect of nuclear annihilation

60

Bergman's direction is incredibly powerful, with many memorable moments - the opening light in the sky; the parade of flagellants; and, of course, the dance of the dead over the hill, shot on the spur of the moment in a truly inspired piece of film-making. 

"Contains some of the most extraordinary images ever committed to celluloid"
*********

n/a

61

What did SS do for audiences?

greatly enlarged potential audiences for films from other foreign directors.

62

SS compared to Hollywood movies

content far more intellectual and less dependent on plot than the standard Hollywood movies.



63

SS & hypocrisy of the crusades

returning soldiers disillusionment with a crusade which does not seem to have fulfilled its Holy purpose

64

Blok meets a young happy couple with their baby. Jof and Mia (the names mean Joseph and Mary) and, as he is so swayed by their cheerfulness and simple innocence, he diverts death from taking them so they can escape and thus he can die without regrets
*************

conclusion/end of SS

65

Symbolism in SS

Religion, Death, Metaphysics, juxtaposing frivolity and terror to confuse moments of jest and threat, 20th century existentialist themes - these are all fair game for Bergman.

66

Most symbolic image of SS

of six figures led a dance by Death silhouetted against a dark stormy sky

67

After WWII, America worked to assure that European film industries reconstituted themselves based on free-market principles rather than on the protectionism that had predominated during the 1930s. Hollywood had a big backlog of films and was eager to export to Europe. And European audiences were anxious to have Hollywood films available once again.

Film relations after WWII

68

why did America fight hard to shape the development of post WWII European film industries

from a desire to purge former axis countries of any cultural remnants of fascism. For this reason, as well as a desire to limit competition

69

Which continent won battle of film distribution?

In the end, America prevailed and films were freely traded like other commodities.



70

How did American producers respond to booming EuroCin?

American producers and investors began to invest in European films where production costs were lower and profit margins higher.

71

Who eventually mastered funding?

Italian directors became especially adept at searching out American investors to finance their films.

72

Who began to produce super subversive films?

the late 50s and early 60s, Swedish and Danish film companies exported “sexually liberated films” to sophisticated international audiences.

73

How much did British filmmaking succeed? Who was it geared towards?

The British film industry in this period concentrated on producing English language films, which they hoped they would be able to market to American audiences. They rarely succeeded.



74

The British film industry in this period concentrated on producing English language films, which they hoped they would be able to market to American audiences. They rarely succeeded.


*********************

n/a

75

Who became successful in spreading intn. film culture? example?

Film festivals also became increasingly important in shaping an international film culture . The Cannes Film Festival was started in 1946 and became an important international showcase for culturally important films,

76

Kurosawa and Ray brought Indian/Japanese films to

VENICE FILM FEST, showing japanese and indian films in front of large international audiences for the first time

77

The term auteur (French for author) is used to describe film directors (or, more rarely, producers or writers) who are considered to have a distinctive, recognizable style, because they:

a) repeatedly return to the same subject matter, 

(b) habitually address a particular psychological or moral theme, 

(c) employ a recurring style, or 


78

Autuers should be ________ despite __________

identifiable despite their genre

79

French Wave influenced by

Italian Neorealism

80

During this same period young film-makers in many countries were creating their own "new waves", for example the working-class cinema of the "angry young men" (Kitchen Sink Cinema) in Britain, but

the new wave movement in France turned out to be the most influential.

81

French New Wave filmmakers linked by

linked by their self-conscious rejection of classical cinematic form and their spirit of youthful iconoclasm

82

French New Waves involvement in politics?

Many also engaged in their work with the social and political upheavals of the era, making their radical experiments with editing, visual style, and narrative part of a general break with the conservative paradigm.



83

2 examples of French New Wave Directors that began as

Critics,

84

By means of criticism and editorialization, they laid the groundwork for a surge of concepts which was later coined as the auteur theory (or, more correctly, "La politique des auteurs" ("The policy of authors").


*********

French New Wavers Truffaut & Godard

85

The beginning of the New Wave was to some extent an exercise by the

 ______ applying _______________

Cahiers writers in applying this philosophy to the world by directing movies themselves.

86

How did French New Wavers address old filmmaking

rebellion against the reliance on past form & criticism

87

French New Wave budget

low budget,

88

What did having low budgets do for french new wavers?

helped film-makers get at the essential art form and find what, to them, was a much more comfortable and honest form of production.

89

Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, Howard Hawks, John Ford, and many B-film directors were held up in admiration while standard Hollywood films bound by traditional narrative flow were strongly criticized.

 By who?

French New Wavers

90

French New Wave's distinct philosophy

existentialism

91

Existentialism stressed _____________

stressed the individual, the experience of free choice, the absence of any rational understanding of the universe and a sense of the absurdity in human life.

92

an existentialist seeks to act authentically, using free will and taking responsibility for all their actions, instead of playing pre-ordained roles dictated by society. The characters in French New Wave films are

often marginalized, young anti-heroes and loners, with no family ties, who behave spontaneously, often act immorally and are frequently seen as anti-authoritarian. There is a general cynicism concerning politics

93

The French New Wave directors took advantage of _________________ which enabled them to ________________

of the new technology that was available to them in the late 1950s enabled them to work on location rather than in the studio.

94

FNW film equiptment

used lightweight hand-held cameras,
developed for use in documentaries,
faster film stocks, which required less light
and light-weight sound and lighting equipment.

95

B/c of equiptment used , how could FNW films be shot?

quickly and cheaply

96

. The cost of film was a major concern; thus, efforts to save film turned into stylistic innovations: for example, in Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless Example of outcome

JUMP CUTS: several scenes feature jump cuts, as they were filmed in one long take: parts that didn't work were simply cut right from the middle of the take, a purposeful stylistic decision.



97

Light & sound preferences of French New Wavers

. Available light was preferred to studio-style lighting and available sound was preferred to extensive studio dubbing.

98

Common setting of FNW films

mise-en-scène of Parisian streets and coffee bars became a defining feature of the films

99

behavior of the camera in FNW films

camera was often very mobile, with a great deal of fluid panning and tracking

100

Often only one camera was used, in highly inventive ways; following characters down streets, into cafes and bars, or looking over their shoulders to watch life go by.
****************** FNW ********************

n/a

101

The way the films were made reflected ____________ by drawing attention to the conventions used in film-making.

an interest in questioning cinema itself,

102

the French New Wave directors strove to present an alternative to Hollywood, by consciously breaking its conventions, while at the same time paying homage to what they regarded as good in Hollywood cinema.
**********************

n/a

103

Jump Cut, 2 definitions

(1) A cut between two shots - that are so similar that the cut appears to be an interruption in a single shot. 


(2) A disjunctive, disorienting cut; a sudden transition that may be illogical or mismatched in relation to normal continuity.

104

Cinema Verité: 

The literal meaning of Cinema Verité is “cinema truth.” Cinema Verité is a documentary style in which no directorial control is exerted.
**************

n/a

105

Direct Cinema

Cinema Verite term is frequently substituted for, or confused with, the term describing the New-Wave’s "handheld" camera techniques in narrative film called “direct cinema”. 


But Godard still used Verite.